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5 - m i n u t e S t r a t e g i c T r a i n i n g f o r E m e r g e n c y P r e p a r e d n e s s COPYRIGHT 2005 Authorization to Copy: No Part of this.

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Presentation on theme: "5 - m i n u t e S t r a t e g i c T r a i n i n g f o r E m e r g e n c y P r e p a r e d n e s s COPYRIGHT 2005 Authorization to Copy: No Part of this."— Presentation transcript:

1 5 - m i n u t e S t r a t e g i c T r a i n i n g f o r E m e r g e n c y P r e p a r e d n e s s COPYRIGHT 2005 Authorization to Copy: No Part of this publications may be reproduced, stored in retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, photocopying, or otherwise, without permission in writing from the copyright holder, the Center for Public Health Preparedness and Research. All rights reserved. Emergency Communication: Making the Initial Statement to the Media 5 - m i n u t e S t r a t e g i c T r a i n i n g f o r E m e r g e n c y P r e p a r e d n e s s Emergency Communication: Making the Initial Statement to the Media

2 5 - m i n u t e S t r a t e g i c T r a i n i n g f o r E m e r g e n c y P r e p a r e d n e s s COPYRIGHT 2005 Authorization to Copy: No Part of this publications may be reproduced, stored in retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, photocopying, or otherwise, without permission in writing from the copyright holder, the Center for Public Health Preparedness and Research. All rights reserved. MAIN MENU Goal and Learning Objectives Questions Course Assessment 5-Minute Training: Making the Initial Statement to the Media

3 5 - m i n u t e S t r a t e g i c T r a i n i n g f o r E m e r g e n c y P r e p a r e d n e s s COPYRIGHT 2005 Authorization to Copy: No Part of this publications may be reproduced, stored in retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, photocopying, or otherwise, without permission in writing from the copyright holder, the Center for Public Health Preparedness and Research. All rights reserved. QUESTIONS If you have any questions or comments, please contact Sean Kaufman at or

4 5 - m i n u t e S t r a t e g i c T r a i n i n g f o r E m e r g e n c y P r e p a r e d n e s s COPYRIGHT 2005 Authorization to Copy: No Part of this publications may be reproduced, stored in retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, photocopying, or otherwise, without permission in writing from the copyright holder, the Center for Public Health Preparedness and Research. All rights reserved. GOAL AND LEARNING OBJECTIVES Goal: The goal of the training is to provide public health professionals with tips when making the initial statement to the media during an emergency. Learning Objectives: 1. List the five steps of communication when making an initial statement to the media during an emergency. 2. Utilize training information to develop initial statements to media during emergency situations.

5 5 - m i n u t e S t r a t e g i c T r a i n i n g f o r E m e r g e n c y P r e p a r e d n e s s COPYRIGHT 2005 Authorization to Copy: No Part of this publications may be reproduced, stored in retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, photocopying, or otherwise, without permission in writing from the copyright holder, the Center for Public Health Preparedness and Research. All rights reserved. PREPAREDNESS TRAINING Emergency Communication: Making the Initial Statement to the Media Sean G. Kaufman, MPH, CHES Director of Programs Center for Public Health Preparedness and Research Rollins School of Public Health Emory University REFERENCES

6 5 - m i n u t e S t r a t e g i c T r a i n i n g f o r E m e r g e n c y P r e p a r e d n e s s COPYRIGHT 2005 Authorization to Copy: No Part of this publications may be reproduced, stored in retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, photocopying, or otherwise, without permission in writing from the copyright holder, the Center for Public Health Preparedness and Research. All rights reserved. INTRODUCTION It’s 9:05 am and you hear that several individuals who received the flu vaccine are reportedly hospitalized with serious illness. Apparently, this is only happening in your district and the media wants a statement. The Director has asked you, based on your expertise, to make the initial statement to the media. Your office calls for a press conference at 10:30 am. What do you do?

7 5 - m i n u t e S t r a t e g i c T r a i n i n g f o r E m e r g e n c y P r e p a r e d n e s s COPYRIGHT 2005 Authorization to Copy: No Part of this publications may be reproduced, stored in retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, photocopying, or otherwise, without permission in writing from the copyright holder, the Center for Public Health Preparedness and Research. All rights reserved. STEP ONE: MAKE A STATEMENT OF EMPATHY The first step you should take is to think about what people are feeling now. Remember to use statements that include “we” and that don’t separate you from the situation. How would you feel if your loved one received a vaccine that made them seriously ill? How would you feel if you received a vaccine that was making other’s seriously ill? Start with a statement acknowledging that this is a serious issue. One that has an impact on people and their lives. Begin your statement with something like: “Our communities and families have been shaken by this terrible situation.”

8 5 - m i n u t e S t r a t e g i c T r a i n i n g f o r E m e r g e n c y P r e p a r e d n e s s COPYRIGHT 2005 Authorization to Copy: No Part of this publications may be reproduced, stored in retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, photocopying, or otherwise, without permission in writing from the copyright holder, the Center for Public Health Preparedness and Research. All rights reserved. STEP TWO: STATE THE FACTS After acknowledging what people are going through, state what you know and what has been confirmed. This may include: Who has been affected? What has caused this? Where has this happened? When did it happen? Why has this happened? How has this happened? Begin with something like: “Individuals receiving vaccines on Friday at the office of Dr. Snow have become ill.”

9 5 - m i n u t e S t r a t e g i c T r a i n i n g f o r E m e r g e n c y P r e p a r e d n e s s COPYRIGHT 2005 Authorization to Copy: No Part of this publications may be reproduced, stored in retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, photocopying, or otherwise, without permission in writing from the copyright holder, the Center for Public Health Preparedness and Research. All rights reserved. STEP THREE: STATE WHAT YOU DON’T KNOW After telling people what you know, tell them what you don’t know. You don’t know if it is just isolated to one doctor’s office. You don’t why or how this happened. Remember, you are not expected to know everything. You should not hide what you do not know. Be as transparent as possible and tell people what they need to know to make decisions about their personal risks. Your statement may begin with something like: “We do not know how this has happened. We also don’t know why it did.”

10 5 - m i n u t e S t r a t e g i c T r a i n i n g f o r E m e r g e n c y P r e p a r e d n e s s COPYRIGHT 2005 Authorization to Copy: No Part of this publications may be reproduced, stored in retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, photocopying, or otherwise, without permission in writing from the copyright holder, the Center for Public Health Preparedness and Research. All rights reserved. STEP FOUR: MAKE A STATEMENT OF COMMITTMENT At this point you should state your commitment to the situation. State that you are committed to the health of people within the community, forging partnerships to deal with this issue, and describe how you plan on answering the questions that you don’t know. The more detailed you are about the process for answering unknown questions, the better. Your statement may begin with something like: “We are committed to this effort and will continue to be. We have formed partnerships with local doctors, vaccine experts, and the CDC to address this issue.”

11 5 - m i n u t e S t r a t e g i c T r a i n i n g f o r E m e r g e n c y P r e p a r e d n e s s COPYRIGHT 2005 Authorization to Copy: No Part of this publications may be reproduced, stored in retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, photocopying, or otherwise, without permission in writing from the copyright holder, the Center for Public Health Preparedness and Research. All rights reserved. STEP FIVE: MORE INFORMATION Wrap your statement up with where people can get more information. It is also important that you let the media know when and where the next press conference will be held. This allows the media to prepare and plan for future communication surrounding this issue. Your statement may begin with something like: “For more information about this issue you can contact our hotline at ”

12 5 - m i n u t e S t r a t e g i c T r a i n i n g f o r E m e r g e n c y P r e p a r e d n e s s COPYRIGHT 2005 Authorization to Copy: No Part of this publications may be reproduced, stored in retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, photocopying, or otherwise, without permission in writing from the copyright holder, the Center for Public Health Preparedness and Research. All rights reserved. SUMMARY During an emergency, when making the initial statement to the media, you should: Make a statement of empathy. State the facts – what you know. State what you don’t know. Make a statement of commitment. State where people can find more information. Course AssessmentStatement Example

13 5 - m i n u t e S t r a t e g i c T r a i n i n g f o r E m e r g e n c y P r e p a r e d n e s s COPYRIGHT 2005 Authorization to Copy: No Part of this publications may be reproduced, stored in retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, photocopying, or otherwise, without permission in writing from the copyright holder, the Center for Public Health Preparedness and Research. All rights reserved. INITIAL STATEMENT EXAMPLE Hello. My name is Anne Smith and I am the Director of Patient Services for the White County. During the past couple of days, we have been affected by a very troubling situation – shaking our community and the lives of loved ones. Currently, we know that several individuals who received flu shots at Dr. Snow’s office on Friday, December 2 have been hospitalized due to serious side-effects. All together, 35 people, 15 men and 20 women have been hospitalized. At this time, we don’t know how or why this has occurred. We are working together with leading experts, vaccine specialists, doctors, and investigators to address this issue. We will remain committed to this effort until we answer the questions that need to be answered and address the issues affecting our community. We will continue to hold press conferences twice a day (morning and afternoon) to keep you updated on any new information. If you have additional questions, please contact the hotline at or visit We know that this is a rough time for many and are working as hard and as fast as possible. Please stay tuned for more information as we will share it as we get it in. Thank you for your patience. Course Assessment

14 5 - m i n u t e S t r a t e g i c T r a i n i n g f o r E m e r g e n c y P r e p a r e d n e s s COPYRIGHT 2005 Authorization to Copy: No Part of this publications may be reproduced, stored in retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, photocopying, or otherwise, without permission in writing from the copyright holder, the Center for Public Health Preparedness and Research. All rights reserved. COURSE ASSESSMENT After submitting the course assessment, we will send an with a receipt listing the participant’s score. If you have any questions, please contact Sean Kaufman at or Thank you! Course AssessmentReferences

15 5 - m i n u t e S t r a t e g i c T r a i n i n g f o r E m e r g e n c y P r e p a r e d n e s s COPYRIGHT 2005 Authorization to Copy: No Part of this publications may be reproduced, stored in retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, photocopying, or otherwise, without permission in writing from the copyright holder, the Center for Public Health Preparedness and Research. All rights reserved. REFERENCES Lum, Max R.; Tinker, Tim L. (1994). A Primer on Health Risk Communication Principles and Practices. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (ATSDR). Reynolds, Barbara (2002). Crisis Emergency Risk Communication. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Reynolds, Barbara (2004). Crisis Emergency Risk Communication by Leaders for Leaders. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Rodman, George (1981). Mass Media Issues: Analysis and Debate. Science Research Associates. Sandman, Peter M. (1993). Responding to Community Outrage: Strategies for Effective Risk Communication. American Industrial Hygiene Association.


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