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We have opportunities to practice literacy skills in big and small ways daily.

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Presentation on theme: "We have opportunities to practice literacy skills in big and small ways daily."— Presentation transcript:

1 We have opportunities to practice literacy skills in big and small ways daily.

2 We give students

3 Southern Regional Education Board, 2009 Policy Statement, page 5 “Asking a teacher to become a reading teacher is distinctly different from asking a teacher to help students master texts within the teacher’s own field... In fact, subject-area teachers are best qualified to help their students master texts in each course. Subject-area teachers should not be expected to teach basic reading skills, but they can help students develop critical strategies & skills for reading texts in each subject.” “Asking a teacher to become a reading teacher is distinctly different from asking a teacher to help students master texts within the teacher’s own field... In fact, subject-area teachers are best qualified to help their students master texts in each course. Subject-area teachers should not be expected to teach basic reading skills, but they can help students develop critical strategies & skills for reading texts in each subject.”

4 Types of Reading Part One Part One

5 Types of Reading Required Disciplinary /Content Literacy Intermediate Literacy Streamlining & Multitasking Phase Basic Literacy Doug Buehl (2011) taken from Shanahan & Shanahan (2008)

6 Types of Reading Required Disciplinary /Content Literacy Intermediate Literacy Streamlining & Multitasking Phase Basic Literacy Doug Buehl (2011) taken from Shanahan & Shanahan (2008) Move from “all participate & get a trophy” to “try out & earn one of the spots on the team” Reading should become a fluent, streamlined process with the brain multi-tasking in the background, not thinking about reading. This frees the frontal lobe for critical thinking. Move from “all participate & get a trophy” to “try out & earn one of the spots on the team” Reading should become a fluent, streamlined process with the brain multi-tasking in the background, not thinking about reading. This frees the frontal lobe for critical thinking.

7 Types of Reading Required Disciplinary /Content Literacy ** Intermediate Literacy Streamlining & Multitasking Phase Basic Literacy Doug Buehl (2011) taken from Shanahan & Shanahan (2008) Predominates middle and high school where students must… -navigate texts from unrelated & distinct disciplines -read and write within a specific discipline -think like a scientist, mathematician, historian, etc. This requires -understanding domain-specific words & phrases -appreciation of norms & conventions of each discipline -attention to details -capacity to evaluate arguments, synthesize complex information & follow detailed instructions and descriptions Predominates middle and high school where students must… -navigate texts from unrelated & distinct disciplines -read and write within a specific discipline -think like a scientist, mathematician, historian, etc. This requires -understanding domain-specific words & phrases -appreciation of norms & conventions of each discipline -attention to details -capacity to evaluate arguments, synthesize complex information & follow detailed instructions and descriptions

8 Types of Reading Required Disciplinary /Content Literacy Intermediate Literacy Streamlining & Multitasking Phase Basic Literacy Doug Buehl (2011) taken from Shanahan & Shanahan (2008)

9 Levels of Competence Part Two Part Two

10 Four Stages of Competence 1. Unconscious Incompetence (I don’t know what I don’t know.) I am unaware that I don’t understand or know how to do something, because I have never needed this skill or been aware of it. I may deny the usefulness of the skill. 1. Unconscious Incompetence (I don’t know what I don’t know.) I am unaware that I don’t understand or know how to do something, because I have never needed this skill or been aware of it. I may deny the usefulness of the skill. 2. Conscious Incompetence (I know what I don’t know.) I become aware that I don’t know or understand or know. I also begin to realize that I want or need this skill and it would be valuable to learn. 2. Conscious Incompetence (I know what I don’t know.) I become aware that I don’t know or understand or know. I also begin to realize that I want or need this skill and it would be valuable to learn. 3. Conscious Competence (I know what it is but have to think about it to do it.) I understand or know how to do something. I can show you, but it requires concentration and effort. It may need to be broken down into steps. 3. Conscious Competence (I know what it is but have to think about it to do it.) I understand or know how to do something. I can show you, but it requires concentration and effort. It may need to be broken down into steps. 4. Unconscious Competence (Piece of cake.) I have had so much practice with a skill that I don’t really need to think about what to do. It has become "second nature" and can be performed with few errors. Because it is not occupying my conscious thoughts, I can do this while I’m doing another task and I am able to teach it to others. 4. Unconscious Competence (Piece of cake.) I have had so much practice with a skill that I don’t really need to think about what to do. It has become "second nature" and can be performed with few errors. Because it is not occupying my conscious thoughts, I can do this while I’m doing another task and I am able to teach it to others.

11 Four Stages of Competence 1. Unconscious Incompetence (I don’t know what I don’t know.) I am unaware that I don’t understand or know how to do something, because I have never needed this skill or been aware of it. I may deny the usefulness of the skill. 1. Unconscious Incompetence (I don’t know what I don’t know.) I am unaware that I don’t understand or know how to do something, because I have never needed this skill or been aware of it. I may deny the usefulness of the skill.

12 Four Stages of Competence 1. Unconscious Incompetence (I don’t know what I don’t know.) I am unaware that I don’t understand or know how to do something, because I have never needed this skill or been aware of it. I may deny the usefulness of the skill. 1. Unconscious Incompetence (I don’t know what I don’t know.) I am unaware that I don’t understand or know how to do something, because I have never needed this skill or been aware of it. I may deny the usefulness of the skill. 2. Conscious Incompetence (I know what I don’t know.) I become aware that I don’t know or understand or know. I also begin to realize that I want or need this skill and it would be valuable to learn. 2. Conscious Incompetence (I know what I don’t know.) I become aware that I don’t know or understand or know. I also begin to realize that I want or need this skill and it would be valuable to learn.

13 Four Stages of Competence 1. Unconscious Incompetence (I don’t know what I don’t know.) I am unaware that I don’t understand or know how to do something, because I have never needed this skill or been aware of it. I may deny the usefulness of the skill. 1. Unconscious Incompetence (I don’t know what I don’t know.) I am unaware that I don’t understand or know how to do something, because I have never needed this skill or been aware of it. I may deny the usefulness of the skill. 2. Conscious Incompetence (I know what I don’t know.) I become aware that I don’t know or understand or know. I also begin to realize that I want or need this skill and it would be valuable to learn. 2. Conscious Incompetence (I know what I don’t know.) I become aware that I don’t know or understand or know. I also begin to realize that I want or need this skill and it would be valuable to learn. 3. Conscious Competence (I know what it is but have to think about it to do it.) I understand or know how to do something. I can show you, but it requires concentration and effort. It may need to be broken down into steps. 3. Conscious Competence (I know what it is but have to think about it to do it.) I understand or know how to do something. I can show you, but it requires concentration and effort. It may need to be broken down into steps.

14 Four Stages of Competence 1. Unconscious Incompetence (I don’t know what I don’t know.) I am unaware that I don’t understand or know how to do something, because I have never needed this skill or been aware of it. I may deny the usefulness of the skill. 1. Unconscious Incompetence (I don’t know what I don’t know.) I am unaware that I don’t understand or know how to do something, because I have never needed this skill or been aware of it. I may deny the usefulness of the skill. 2. Conscious Incompetence (I know what I don’t know.) I become aware that I don’t know or understand or know. I also begin to realize that I want or need this skill and it would be valuable to learn. 2. Conscious Incompetence (I know what I don’t know.) I become aware that I don’t know or understand or know. I also begin to realize that I want or need this skill and it would be valuable to learn. 3. Conscious Competence (I know what it is but have to think about it to do it.) I understand or know how to do something. I can show you, but it requires concentration and effort. It may need to be broken down into steps. 3. Conscious Competence (I know what it is but have to think about it to do it.) I understand or know how to do something. I can show you, but it requires concentration and effort. It may need to be broken down into steps. 4. Unconscious Competence (Piece of cake.) I have had so much practice with a skill that I don’t really need to think about what to do. It has become "second nature" and can be performed with few errors. Because it is not occupying my conscious thoughts, I can do this while I’m doing another task and I am able to teach it to others. 4. Unconscious Competence (Piece of cake.) I have had so much practice with a skill that I don’t really need to think about what to do. It has become "second nature" and can be performed with few errors. Because it is not occupying my conscious thoughts, I can do this while I’m doing another task and I am able to teach it to others.

15 Doug Buehl (2011) taken from Shanahan & Shanahan (2008) Disciplinary /Content Literacy Intermediate Literacy ** Streamlining & Multitasking Phase Basic Literacy 1. Unconscious Incompetence (I don’t know what I don’t know.) I am unaware that I don’t understand or know how to do something, because I have never needed this skill or been aware of it. I may deny the usefulness of the skill. 1. Unconscious Incompetence (I don’t know what I don’t know.) I am unaware that I don’t understand or know how to do something, because I have never needed this skill or been aware of it. I may deny the usefulness of the skill. 2. Conscious Incompetence (I know what I don’t know.) I become aware that I don’t know or understand or know. I also begin to realize that I want or need this skill and it would be valuable to learn. 2. Conscious Incompetence (I know what I don’t know.) I become aware that I don’t know or understand or know. I also begin to realize that I want or need this skill and it would be valuable to learn. 3. Conscious Competence (I know what it is but have to think about it to do it.) I understand or know how to do something. I can show you, but it requires concentration and effort. It may need to be broken down into steps. 3. Conscious Competence (I know what it is but have to think about it to do it.) I understand or know how to do something. I can show you, but it requires concentration and effort. It may need to be broken down into steps. 4. Unconscious Competence (Piece of cake.) I have had so much practice with a skill that I don’t really need to think about what to do. It has become "second nature" and can be performed with few errors. Because it is not occupying my conscious thoughts, I can do this while I’m doing another task and I am able to teach it to others. 4. Unconscious Competence (Piece of cake.) I have had so much practice with a skill that I don’t really need to think about what to do. It has become "second nature" and can be performed with few errors. Because it is not occupying my conscious thoughts, I can do this while I’m doing another task and I am able to teach it to others.

16 Literacy = Communication Part Three Part Three

17 Going in cold… A Video Clip The only “foundational information” you get is… #1 It is from Modern Family #2 Think about the term “disciplinary/content literacy” as you watch this. A Video Clip The only “foundational information” you get is… #1 It is from Modern Family #2 Think about the term “disciplinary/content literacy” as you watch this.

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21 Disciplinary /Content Literacy Intermediate Literacy ** Streamlining & Multitasking Phase Basic Literacy 1. Unconscious Incompetence (I don’t know what I don’t know.) I am unaware that I don’t understand or know how to do something, because I have never needed this skill or been aware of it. I may deny the usefulness of the skill. 1. Unconscious Incompetence (I don’t know what I don’t know.) I am unaware that I don’t understand or know how to do something, because I have never needed this skill or been aware of it. I may deny the usefulness of the skill. 2. Conscious Incompetence (I know what I don’t know.) I become aware that I don’t know or understand or know. I also begin to realize that I want or need this skill and it would be valuable to learn. 2. Conscious Incompetence (I know what I don’t know.) I become aware that I don’t know or understand or know. I also begin to realize that I want or need this skill and it would be valuable to learn. 3. Conscious Competence (I know what it is but have to think about it to do it.) I understand or know how to do something. I can show you, but it requires concentration and effort. It may need to be broken down into steps. 3. Conscious Competence (I know what it is but have to think about it to do it.) I understand or know how to do something. I can show you, but it requires concentration and effort. It may need to be broken down into steps. 4. Unconscious Competence (Piece of cake.) I have had so much practice with a skill that I don’t really need to think about what to do. It has become "second nature" and can be performed with few errors. Because it is not occupying my conscious thoughts, I can do this while I’m doing another task and I am able to teach it to others. 4. Unconscious Competence (Piece of cake.) I have had so much practice with a skill that I don’t really need to think about what to do. It has become "second nature" and can be performed with few errors. Because it is not occupying my conscious thoughts, I can do this while I’m doing another task and I am able to teach it to others. Types of Reading Levels of Competency Literacy = Communication

22 Literacy = Communicate Part Three Part Three Types of Reading Levels of Competence Part Two Part Two Part One Part One What do these have to do with content literacy? What does this have to do with YOU? What do these have to do with content literacy? What does this have to do with YOU?

23 Transferring Skills Part Four Part Four Informational Text Multiple Text

24 Consider This Why Integrate Literacy and Social Studies? Schell, E. (2007) Let’s go to a movie… You scan the newspaper or computer for titles and times. I’ll check out theater show times, distances for travel and ticket prices. Let’s discuss our choices (text or talk)– comparing and contrasting our options and sharing opinions and thoughts about movies and casts Agree on one movie Get dressed and gather items needed to go – consider weather, time of day, location and travel Make travel plans – get money, decide transportation method, buy gas/pay taxi

25 Consider This Why Integrate Literacy and Social Studies? Schell, E. (2007) Let’s go to a movie… You scan the newspaper or computer for titles and times. I’ll check out theater show times, distances for travel and ticket prices. Let’s discuss our choices – comparing and contrasting our options and sharing opinions and thoughts about movies and casts Agree on one movie Get dressed and items needed to go – consider weather, time of day, location and travel Make travel plans – get money, decide transportation method, buy gas/pay taxi Listening ! Reading ! Speaking ! Math ! Science ! Social Studies ! Informational Text Multiple Text

26 Why Integrate Literacy and Social Studies? Schell, E. (2007) “… we do not divide our time to focus on various subject matter … in fact, we find that subject matters overlap easily and skills often transfer” Skills I taught in language arts that I use in social studies (work in progress) Sequencing Setting Character Analysis & Development Genre

27 What do you speak? Chapter Three Chapter Three Types of Reading Levels of Competence Chapter Two Chapter Two Chapter One Chapter One Transfer Skills Chapter Four Chapter Four


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