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Bell Ringer Subject-Verb Agreement Subject-verb agreement is a grammatical rule that states that the verb must agree in number with its subject. In English,

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Presentation on theme: "Bell Ringer Subject-Verb Agreement Subject-verb agreement is a grammatical rule that states that the verb must agree in number with its subject. In English,"— Presentation transcript:

1 Bell Ringer Subject-Verb Agreement Subject-verb agreement is a grammatical rule that states that the verb must agree in number with its subject. In English, present tense verbs change to show agreement in the third person singular form (subjects represented by the pronouns HE, SHE, IT) by adding an S or ES.

2 2/26 Bell Ringer: 1)Read each sentence. 2)Write the form of the verb that agrees with the sentence. 1.Two heads _______ better than one. 2.Tom and Jerry _______ the symphony orchestra. 3.His parents or Bart _______ out to the store every day.

3 2/22 Reflection List facts that you know about Martin Luther King, Jr., Rosa Parks and/or Civil Rights. Reading Intervention Chapter: Book Web

4 Review Sheet 18 Due Friday!

5 Found Poem You will need to create one Found Poem: 1.Pick a child from Ender’s Game AND one of the documentaries/videos we watched. 2.Include a clear moral judgment on the use of child soldiers in Ender’s Game and the videos. 3.Compare/contrast the lives of child soldiers with the children at Battle School. Use your Graphic Organizer from the Videos. Make a rough draft in your notebook first. It will change from rough to final draft because you are finding text. You need a starting point. You will turn Graphic Organizer in for a 25 point Completion Grade.

6 Collage You will need to create a Collage: 1.Find pictures and words that describe the events, characters and themes of Ender’s Game. 2.Compare/contrast the lives of child soldiers with the children at Battle School. Use your Graphic Organizer from the Videos. You will turn Graphic Organizer in for a 25 point Completion Grade.

7 Warriors Don’t Cry Millburn/Weisbrodt

8 Recycle Remove everything you have in your folder/binder. We are starting a new book/unit. The only paper you need is your Review Sheet.

9 Warriors Don’t Cry Reading Schedule DAYPAGESCHAPTERS Day Day Day Day Day Day Day Day Day Day Day Day Day end

10 Warriors Don’t Cry Intro Title: Warriors Don’t Cry Author: Melba Pattillo Beals Copyright: 1994 Genre: Non-fiction Sub-Genre: History, Civil Rights Characters: High School kids, adults/parents Protagonist: Melba and Little Rock Nine Antagonist: Classmates, society, laws, racism

11 Melba Pattillo Bio Melba Pattillo was born in Little Rock, Arkansas December 7, Her parents were divorced when she was seven, and she lived with her mother and grandmother. Melba's mother, Dr. Lois Pattillo, was an English teacher, and one of the first black students to integrate the University of Arkansas. Melba was 12 years old on May 17, 1954 the date the Supreme Court ruled in "Brown vs. Board of Education" that racial segregation in public schools was unconstitutional. Just over a year later, on May 24, 1955, the Little Rock school board adopted a plan to limit integration to Central High School, but claimed this would not occur for another two years. When the time came to sign up for Central High, Melba raised her hand and put her name on the sheet. She and eight other students became the “Little Rock Nine” and were the first black students to attend Central High.

12 Warriors Don’t Cry Little Rock Nine Separate But Not Equal

13 Civil Rights Plessy v. Ferguson – made separate but equal facilities for white and black students Brown v. Board of Education – ended legal segregation in public schools Jim Crow Laws – punishable by law for black to use white facilities

14 Separate But Equal?

15 Jim Crow Laws “All railroads carrying passengers in the state (other than street railroads) shall provide equal but separate accommodations for the white and colored races, by providing two or more passenger cars for each passenger train, or by dividing the cars by a partition, so as to secure separate accommodations.”—Tennessee, 1891 “Marriages are void when one party is a white person and the other is possessed of one- eighth or more negro, Japanese, or Chinese blood.”—Nebraska, 1911 “The Corporate Commission is hereby vested with power to require telephone companies in the State of Oklahoma to maintain separate booths for white and colored patrons when there is a demand for such separate booths.”—Oklahoma, 1915 “Any person... presenting for public acceptance or general information, arguments or suggestions in favor of social equality or of intermarriage between whites and negroes, shall be guilty of a misdemeanor and subject to a fine not exceeding five hundred dollars or imprisonment not exceeding six months or both fine and imprisonment in the discretion of the court.”—Mississippi, 1920 “Any white woman who shall suffer or permit herself to be got with child by a negro or mulatto... shall be sentenced to the penitentiary for not less than eighteen months.”— Maryland, 1924 "No colored barber shall serve as a barber to white women or girls."—Atlanta, Georgia, 1926 “It shall be unlawful for a negro and white person to play together or in company with each other in any game of cards or dice, dominoes or checkers.”—Birmingham, Alabama, 1930

16 Warriors Don’t Cry Intro Pictures and Political Cartoons Movie Theater KKK March One Less Vote

17 Warriors Don’t Cry Intro Little Rock Nine Brown v. Board of Education Plessy v. Ferguson Jim Crow Laws Thurgood Marshall – United Streaming and Time Magazine for Kids Little Rock Nine Now – United Streaming

18 Geography Use an atlas to respond to the following questions.

19

20 Geography 1.Where is Little Rock, Arkansas located? 2.What states border Arkansas? 3.What type of climate would you expect to find in Arkansas? 4.Find and label these other states: Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Tennessee, Georgia, Florida, N. Carolina, S. Carolina, and Virginia. 5.Where is Santa Rosa, California?

21 Warriors Don’t Cry Intro What are some forms of media? What is the definition of media? List the positives and negatives of having so much information that is easily available.

22 Warriors Don’t Cry Intro What If? Read the paragraphs about the high school football situation and answer the three questions on the lines provided. 1.Were the girls right to contact the media? 2.How could the media coverage affect their daily lives? 3.What should the media’s role be in this situation?

23 Warriors Don’t Cry Intro How can the media unite or divide us? What are some forms of media? What is the definition of media? List the positives and negatives of having so much information that is easily available. So, how can the media unite or divide us?

24 Topic. Strand. Statement. Reading Nonfiction: 1.Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. 2.Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to supporting ideas; provide an objective summary of the text. 3.Analyze how a text makes connections among and distinctions between individuals, ideas, or events (e.g., through comparisons, analogies, or categories). 4.Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts. 5.Analyze in detail the structure of a specific paragraph in a text, including the role of particular sentences in developing and refining a key concept. 6.Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author acknowledges and responds to conflicting evidence or viewpoints. 7.Evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of using different mediums (e.g., print or digital text, video, multimedia) to present a particular topic or idea. 8.Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; recognize when irrelevant evidence is introduced. 9.Analyze a case in which two or more texts provide conflicting information on the same topic and identify where the texts disagree on matters of fact or interpretation. 10.By the end of the year, read and comprehend literary nonfiction at the high end of the grades 6-8 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

25 Annotating While reading, highlight/note the following: People/Characters – blue Settings & Events – yellow Figurative Language – pink Important Info – green Unfamiliar word or concept - ?

26 Warriors Don’t Cry Introduction While/after reading, complete the Guided Reading Questions that accompany the Dedication and Introduction. Do not need to annotate the Introduction. Stop at Page 1. You will turn in at the end of class for a Completion Grade.

27 Warriors Don’t Cry CH 1 Open your book to Pages While reading, highlight/note the following: People/Characters – blue (8-10) Settings & Events – yellow (4-6) Figurative Language – pink () Important Info – green (1-2 per page) Unfamiliar word or concept - ?

28 2/26 Reflection List 3-5 facts that you learned about the struggle for Civil Rights.

29 Bell Ringer Subject-Verb Agreement Subject-verb agreement is a grammatical rule that states that the verb must agree in number with its subject. In English, present tense verbs change to show agreement in the third person singular form (subjects represented by the pronouns HE, SHE, IT) by adding an S or ES.

30 2/27 Bell Ringer: 1)Read each sentence. 2)Write the form of a verb that agrees with the sentence. 1.The coach, as well as his players, _______ a fierce competitor. 2.Neither Nina nor Louise _______ to patch up the relationship to save the band. 3.We _______ the portion into two equal pieces.

31 2/28 Bell Ringer: 1)Read each sentence. 2)Write the form of a verb that agrees with the sentence. 1.The columnists and the editor _______ all of the editorials in the newspaper daily. 2.News _______ fast around here. 3.Each of the musicians _______ an instrument when the conductor signals with the baton.

32 2/26 Reflection List 3-5 facts that you learned about the struggle for Civil Rights.

33 Topic. Strand. Statement. Reading Nonfiction: 1.Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. 2.Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to supporting ideas; provide an objective summary of the text. 3.Analyze how a text makes connections among and distinctions between individuals, ideas, or events (e.g., through comparisons, analogies, or categories). 4.Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts. 5.Analyze in detail the structure of a specific paragraph in a text, including the role of particular sentences in developing and refining a key concept. 6.Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author acknowledges and responds to conflicting evidence or viewpoints. 7.Evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of using different mediums (e.g., print or digital text, video, multimedia) to present a particular topic or idea. 8.Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; recognize when irrelevant evidence is introduced. 9.Analyze a case in which two or more texts provide conflicting information on the same topic and identify where the texts disagree on matters of fact or interpretation. 10.By the end of the year, read and comprehend literary nonfiction at the high end of the grades 6-8 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

34 Warriors Don’t Cry Intro Pictures and Political Cartoons KKK March One Less Vote

35 Warriors Don’t Cry Intro Jim Crow Laws Plessy v. Ferguson Thurgood Marshall – United Streaming and Time Magazine for Kids Little Rock Nine Now – United Streaming

36 Minnijean Brown Born September 11, 1941, in Little Rock and 16 years old when she entered Central High School. Although all of the nine experienced verbal and physical harassment during the school year at Central, Brown was first suspended, and then expelled for retaliating against daily torment. In February of 1958, she moved to New York and lived with Doctors Kenneth B. and Mamie Clark, African-American psychologists. She graduated from New York's New Lincoln School in Brown attended Southern Illinois University and majored in journalism. She later moved to Canada, where she received a Bachelor of Social Work in Native Human Services from Laurentian University and a Master of Social Work from Carleton University in Ontario, Canada. Brown is a social activist and has worked on behalf of peacemaking, environmental issues, developing youth leadership, diversity education and training, cross-cultural communication, and gender and social justice advocacy. She served in the Clinton Administration as Deputy Assistant Secretary for Workforce Diversity at the Department of the Interior from 1999 to She has taught social work at Carleton University and in various community colleges in Canada. She is the recipient of numerous awards for her community work for social justice, including the Lifetime Achievement Tribute by the Canadian Race Relations Foundation and the International Wolf Award for contributions to racial harmony.

37 Annotating While reading, highlight/note the following: People/Characters – blue Settings & Events – yellow Figurative Language – pink Important Info – green Unfamiliar word or concept - ?

38 Warriors Don’t Cry Introduction While/after reading, complete the Guided Reading Questions that accompany the Dedication and Introduction. Do not need to annotate the Introduction. Stop at Page 1. You will turn in at the end of class for a Completion Grade.

39 Warriors Don’t Cry Summary Sheet There is a box for all 18 Chapters. After answering your reflection, write a 20 word or less summary of the chapter(s) that we read that day. We will collect at the end of the book for a grade.

40 Warriors Don’t Cry CH 1 Open your book to Pages While reading, highlight/note the following: People/Characters – blue (8-10) Settings & Events – yellow (4-6) Figurative Language – pink (3-5) Important Info – green (1-2 per page) Unfamiliar word or concept - ?

41 Warriors Don’t Cry CH 1 Read pages 1-11 in your book. Annotate while reading. Focus on People. Show me your annotations before moving on. After reading, complete the “Zoom in on Key Details” and “Seeing the Big Picture” pages. Turn in for a completion grade.

42 2/27 Reflection List three details of the author, Melba Pattillo Beals. Summary Sheet CH 1

43 Bell Ringer Subject-Verb Agreement Subject-verb agreement is a grammatical rule that states that the verb must agree in number with its subject. In English, present tense verbs change to show agreement in the third person singular form (subjects represented by the pronouns HE, SHE, IT) by adding an S or ES.

44 3/1 Bell Ringer: 1)Read each sentence. 2)Write the form of a verb that agrees with the sentence. 1.The binoculars for the men in the battalion _______ cumbersome, to say the least. 2.My friends _______ recommended the movie to me. 3.All of the workers _______ $10 per hour.

45 2/28 Reflection List three details of the author, Melba Pattillo Beals. Summary Sheet CH 1

46 Review Sheet 18 Due Friday! 1.B 2.C 3.B 4.C 5.C 6.B

47 Topic. Strand. Statement. Reading Nonfiction: 1.Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. 2.Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to supporting ideas; provide an objective summary of the text. 3.Analyze how a text makes connections among and distinctions between individuals, ideas, or events (e.g., through comparisons, analogies, or categories). 4.Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts. 5.Analyze in detail the structure of a specific paragraph in a text, including the role of particular sentences in developing and refining a key concept. 6.Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author acknowledges and responds to conflicting evidence or viewpoints. 7.Evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of using different mediums (e.g., print or digital text, video, multimedia) to present a particular topic or idea Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; recognize when irrelevant evidence is introduced Analyze a case in which two or more texts provide conflicting information on the same topic and identify where the texts disagree on matters of fact or interpretation. 10.By the end of the year, read and comprehend literary nonfiction at the high end of the grades 6-8 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

48 Elizabeth Eckford Born on October 4, 1941, and is one of six children. The image of 15-year old Eckford, walking alone through a screaming mob in front of Central High School, propelled the crisis into the nation's living rooms and brought international attention to Little Rock. On September 4, 1957, Elizabeth Eckford arrived at Central High School alone. She got off the bus a block from the school and tried to enter the campus, but was turned away by Arkansas National Guard troops. She then confronted an angry mob of people opposing integration, chanting, "Two, four, six, eight, we ain't gonna integrate." As she made her way down the block, Eckford attempted two more times to enter the school campus, but was blocked by the guardsmen, who were there under orders from the governor to keep them out. Eckford made her way through the mob and sat on a bus bench at the end of the block. She was eventually able to board a city bus, and went to her mother's job at the Arkansas School for the Deaf. Because all of the city's high schools were closed the following year, Eckford did not graduate from Central High School. She joined the U.S. Army, and was able to earn her G.E.D. and returned to Little Rock in the 1960s to be closer to her parents. She attended Central State University in Wilberforce, Ohio. Eckford is an Army veteran, and has held various jobs throughout her life. She has been a waitress, history teacher, welfare worker, unemployment and employment interviewer, and a military reporter.

49 Long Road to Equality While watching the video, write a definition or description for each term listed. After the video, complete the Fill in the Blank activity. Turn in when completed.

50 2/29 Reflection Using 20 words, describe Melba’s father. Summary Sheet CH 2-3

51 Bell Ringer Multiple Meaning Words The term "multiple meaning words" is loosely applied to written words that can have more than one use or definition, and the intended use must be conveyed by the context, the other words in the sentence or paragraph. Homographs are words that are written the same, but have different meanings and word forms, and may have different pronunciations. This is common where words such as "dance" or "cut" share the same spelling for their noun and verb forms. Example : lead (the metal) and lead (the verb for going ahead). Without the sound difference, it may need to be clarified

52 3/4 Bell Ringer: 1)Read each sentence. 2)Write the definition of how the word is used in the sentence. 3)Write an alternate definition of the word. 1.The problem might stem from his lack of studying. 2.It struck me that maybe I could audition for the play, too. 3.The only piece of art in the bright yellow room was surprisingly grave.

53 Review Sheet 19 Due Friday!

54 Topic. Strand. Statement. Reading Nonfiction: 1.Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. 2.Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to supporting ideas; provide an objective summary of the text. 3.Analyze how a text makes connections among and distinctions between individuals, ideas, or events (e.g., through comparisons, analogies, or categories). 4.Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts. 5.Analyze in detail the structure of a specific paragraph in a text, including the role of particular sentences in developing and refining a key concept. 6.Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author acknowledges and responds to conflicting evidence or viewpoints. 7.Evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of using different mediums (e.g., print or digital text, video, multimedia) to present a particular topic or idea Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; recognize when irrelevant evidence is introduced Analyze a case in which two or more texts provide conflicting information on the same topic and identify where the texts disagree on matters of fact or interpretation. 10.By the end of the year, read and comprehend literary nonfiction at the high end of the grades 6-8 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

55 Ernest Green Born in Little Rock, Arkansas, on September 22, Green made history as the only senior among the "Little Rock Nine." His place in Arkansas' civil rights history was solidified when he became the first African-American to graduate from the previously all-white high school in May of An active member of the community from an early age, Green regularly attended church. He was involved in the Boy Scouts and eventually became an Eagle Scout. He was a student at Horace Mann High School before volunteering to integrate all-white Central High School. Green persevered through a year of daily harassment by some of his fellow students to become the first African-American Central High graduate on May 25, Sitting with Green's family at the event was the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., who attended the graduation virtually unnoticed. After graduating from high school, Green attended Michigan State University, earning a bachelor's degree in 1962 and a master's degree in 1964 in sociology. Afterwards, he served as the director for the A. Phillip Randolph Education Fund from 1968 to He then was appointed as the assistant Secretary of Housing and Urban Affairs during President Jimmy Carter's administration from 1977 to Currently, Green is Managing Director at Lehman Brothers in Washington, D.C. and has been with the company since He has served on numerous boards, such as the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and the Winthrop Rockefeller Foundation. Green is married with three children. In 1992, Disney produced a television special, The Ernest Green Story, which is still popular for students of all ages today and used in classrooms around the world to teach about the Little Rock Nine.

56 Warriors Don’t Cry Intro Pictures and Political Cartoons One Less Vote

57 Warriors Don’t Cry Intro Plessy v. Ferguson Thurgood Marshall – United Streaming and Time Magazine for Kids Little Rock Nine Now – United Streaming

58 Warriors Don’t Cry CH 2 Open your book to Pages While reading, highlight/note the following: People/Characters – blue (4-6) Settings & Events – yellow (3-5) Figurative Language – pink (1-2) Important Info – green (1-2 per page) Unfamiliar word or concept - ?

59 Warriors Don’t Cry CH 2 While reading Chapter 2, complete the chart that shows facts and feelings about Brown v. Board of Education. Draw the T-chart below in your notebook. Facts Feelings

60 Warriors Don’t Cry CH 2 Facts Violence against AA was a result Little to no rights for AA Go to school with white kids for the 1 st time Little Rock School board adopts plan for integration Feelings Whites did not want integration Frightened Worried Anger towards white and inequality

61 Warriors Don’t Cry CH 2 Facts Melba going to Central High Made integration legal Segregation was illegal Feelings Melba almost raped due to reaction of white man Lois upset at Melba for signing up Excited about differences in Cincy Teachers were happy and proud “…I was going to die.”

62 Warriors Don’t Cry CH 3 Open your book to Pages While reading, highlight/note the following: People/Characters – blue (10-15) Settings & Events – yellow (5-7) Figurative Language – pink (1-2) Important Info – green (1-2 per page) Unfamiliar word or concept - ?

63 Warriors Don’t Cry CH 3 Read pages in your book. Annotate while you read. Show your annotations before receiving the Character Description Chart. After annotating, complete the Character Description Chart. Add Gloria Ray to the bottom/back.

64 Warriors Don’t Cry Summary Sheet There is a box for all 18 Chapters. After answering your reflection, write a 20 word or less summary of the chapter(s) that we read that day. We will collect at the end of the book for a grade.

65 3/4 Reflection Describe the Plessy v. Ferguson and Brown v. Board of Education court cases. What did each court case state? Summary Sheet CH 2-3

66 Bell Ringer Multiple Meaning Words The term "multiple meaning words" is loosely applied to written words that can have more than one use or definition, and the intended use must be conveyed by the context, the other words in the sentence or paragraph. Homographs are words that are written the same, but have different meanings and word forms, and may have different pronunciations. This is common where words such as "dance" or "cut" share the same spelling for their noun and verb forms. Example : lead (the metal) and lead (the verb for going ahead). Without the sound difference, it may need to be clarified

67 3/5 Bell Ringer: 1)Read each sentence. 2)Write the definition of how the word is used in the sentence. 3)Write an alternate definition of the word. 1.Marcus told Megan that she had nothing but base motives. 2.She will tear that note to shreds after she reads it! 3.Mario was way too sharp to trick.

68 3/4 Reflection Describe the Plessy v. Ferguson and Brown v. Board of Education court cases. What did each court case state? Summary Sheet CH 2-3

69 Topic. Strand. Statement. Reading Nonfiction: 1.Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. 2.Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to supporting ideas; provide an objective summary of the text. 3.Analyze how a text makes connections among and distinctions between individuals, ideas, or events (e.g., through comparisons, analogies, or categories). 4.Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts. 5.Analyze in detail the structure of a specific paragraph in a text, including the role of particular sentences in developing and refining a key concept. 6.Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author acknowledges and responds to conflicting evidence or viewpoints. 7.Evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of using different mediums (e.g., print or digital text, video, multimedia) to present a particular topic or idea Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; recognize when irrelevant evidence is introduced Analyze a case in which two or more texts provide conflicting information on the same topic and identify where the texts disagree on matters of fact or interpretation. 10.By the end of the year, read and comprehend literary nonfiction at the high end of the grades 6-8 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

70 Does Racism Still Exist? 1.Does Racism Still Exist? 2.What are examples/forms of racism seen today? Discuss the two questions in small groups. We will use your small group discussion to have a brief class discussion.

71 Does Racism Still Exist? Oberlin College is a small, traditionally all African-American college near Cleveland, OH. Recently, classes were cancelled because of racist graffiti and threatening messages that were spread throughout campus.

72 Does Racism Still Exist? Read the article from CNN News and complete the Venn Diagram that compares/contrasts the events at Oberlin College with events in Warriors Don’t Cry. Include 10 total facts/items in your Venn Diagram. Anti-Semitic = anti Jewish

73 Does Racism Still Exist? Oberlin College Warriors Don’t Cry People spread racist flyers Charges are being pursued Graffiti Takes place at a college Socially acceptable Community in on it More racists versus non Arkansas Physical violence Cops do nothing Racism Discrimination KKK Towards African Americans Education environment

74 Does Racism Still Exist? Oberlin College Warriors Don’t Cry Both NO ONE HURT POLICE ARE HELPING COULD BE A PRANK MEETING TO DISCUSS ONLY A FEW INVOLVED OUT OF THE ORDINARY CONFINED VIOLENT DIRECTED MAINLY AT AFRICAN AMERICANS PROUD OF IGNORANCE CROWDS AGAINST KIDS ALL WHITE SCHOOL PHYSICAL THREATS/VIOLENCE POLICE STOOD BY CAUSED BY RACISM KKK AFFECT EDUCATION SCHOOLS STUDENTS DROP OUT FEEL UNSAFE

75 Warriors Don’t Cry Intro Thurgood Marshall – United Streaming and Time Magazine for Kids Answer the questions about Thurgood Marshall. Turn paper over and answer the questions about the photo of the Little Rock Nine.

76 OAA Prep Two Minute Free Write: “What makes a good 4 point response?” Student Responses:

77 OAA Prep Helping Students Answer 2 and 4 Point Questions Helping Students Answer 2 and 4 Point Questions Box It! OAA Extended Response

78 Thelma Mothershed Wair Born in 1940 in Bloomberg, Texas. Wair attended Dunbar Junior High School and Horace Mann High School before transferring to Central. Despite daily torment from white students at Central, she completed her junior year at the formerly all- white high school during the tumultuous year. Because the city's high schools were closed the following year, Wair earned the necessary credits for graduation through correspondence courses and by attending summer school in St. Louis, Missouri. She received her diploma from Central High School by mail. Thelma Mothershed Wair graduated from Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, in 1964 and earned her master's degree in Guidance and Counseling, as well as an Administrative Certificate in Education from Southern Illinois University, Edwardsville. Wair taught home economics in the East St. Louis school system for 28 years before retiring in Wair has also worked at the St. Clair County Jail, Juvenile Detention Center in St. Clair County, Illinois, and was an instructor of survival skills for women at the American Red Cross Shelter for the homeless. During the school year, she was honored as an Outstanding Role Model by the East St. Louis chapter of the Top Ladies of Distinction and the Early Childhood-Pre-Kindergarten staff of District 189. Wair and her late husband have one son.

79 Warriors Don’t Cry CH 4 Open your book to Pages While reading, highlight/note the following: People/Characters – blue (4-6) Settings & Events – yellow (2-4) Figurative Language – pink (4-6) Important Info – green (1-2 per page) Unfamiliar word or concept - ?

80 Chapter 4 In your spiral notebook: Choose the three most important events from the chapter. Include a quote from the chapter to support your answer. Three events = three quotes

81 Chapter 4 Event 1: Quote/Page #: Event 2: Quote/Page #: Event 3: Quote/Page #:

82 Warriors Don’t Cry Summary Sheet There is a box for all 18 Chapters. After answering your reflection, write a 20 word or less summary of the chapter(s) that we read that day. We will collect at the end of the book for a grade.

83 3/5 Reflection Why did Melba want to stay in Cincinnati? Summary Sheet CH 4

84 Bell Ringer Multiple Meaning Words The term "multiple meaning words" is loosely applied to written words that can have more than one use or definition, and the intended use must be conveyed by the context, the other words in the sentence or paragraph. Homographs are words that are written the same, but have different meanings and word forms, and may have different pronunciations. Example : lead (the metal) and lead (the verb for going ahead). Without the sound difference, it may need to be clarified.

85 3/7 Bell Ringer: 1)Read each sentence. 2)Write the correct form of the homograph. 1.Ms. Krill likes to go to ________ house. 2.Mr. Mullen is ____ minutes away from work. 3.Mr. Derrig wants to go to the movies ______.

86 3/4 Reflection Why did Melba want to stay in Cincinnati? Summary Sheet CH 4

87 Warriors Don’t Cry Reading Schedule DAYPAGESCHAPTERS Day Day Day Day Day Day Day Day Day Day Day end

88 OAA Prep Two Minute Free Write: “What makes a good 4 point response?” Student Responses:

89 OAA Prep Helping Students Answer 2 and 4 Point Questions Helping Students Answer 2 and 4 Point Questions Box It! OAA Extended Response

90 Thelma Mothershed Wair Born in 1940 in Bloomberg, Texas. Wair attended Dunbar Junior High School and Horace Mann High School before transferring to Central. Despite daily torment from white students at Central, she completed her junior year at the formerly all- white high school during the tumultuous year. Because the city's high schools were closed the following year, Wair earned the necessary credits for graduation through correspondence courses and by attending summer school in St. Louis, Missouri. She received her diploma from Central High School by mail. Thelma Mothershed Wair graduated from Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, in 1964 and earned her master's degree in Guidance and Counseling, as well as an Administrative Certificate in Education from Southern Illinois University, Edwardsville. Wair taught home economics in the East St. Louis school system for 28 years before retiring in Wair has also worked at the St. Clair County Jail, Juvenile Detention Center in St. Clair County, Illinois, and was an instructor of survival skills for women at the American Red Cross Shelter for the homeless. During the school year, she was honored as an Outstanding Role Model by the East St. Louis chapter of the Top Ladies of Distinction and the Early Childhood-Pre-Kindergarten staff of District 189. Wair and her late husband have one son.

91 Topic. Strand. Statement. Reading Nonfiction: 1.Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. 2.Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to supporting ideas; provide an objective summary of the text. 3.Analyze how a text makes connections among and distinctions between individuals, ideas, or events (e.g., through comparisons, analogies, or categories). 4.Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts. 5.Analyze in detail the structure of a specific paragraph in a text, including the role of particular sentences in developing and refining a key concept. 6.Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author acknowledges and responds to conflicting evidence or viewpoints. 7.Evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of using different mediums (e.g., print or digital text, video, multimedia) to present a particular topic or idea Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; recognize when irrelevant evidence is introduced Analyze a case in which two or more texts provide conflicting information on the same topic and identify where the texts disagree on matters of fact or interpretation. 10.By the end of the year, read and comprehend literary nonfiction at the high end of the grades 6-8 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

92 Warriors Don’t Cry CH 4 Open your book to Pages While reading, highlight/note the following: People/Characters – blue (4-6) Settings & Events – yellow (2-4) Figurative Language – pink (4-6) Important Info – green (1-2 per page) Unfamiliar word or concept - ?

93 Chapter 4 In your spiral notebook: Choose the three most important events from the chapter. Include a quote from the chapter to support your answer. Three events = three quotes

94 Chapter 4 Event 1: Quote/Page #: Event 2: Quote/Page #: Event 3: Quote/Page #:

95 Warriors Don’t Cry Free at Last – History of Civil Rights Rosewood Massacre – town in Florida is burned to the ground after a false accusation Medgar Evers Smithsonian Institute: Portrait of Medgar Evers Freedom Riders Did They Die in Vain? – chronicles the investigation of the slaying of three civil rights workers.

96 Review Sheet 19 Due Friday!

97 Warriors Don’t Cry Summary Sheet There is a box for all 18 Chapters. After answering your reflection, write a 20 word or less summary of the chapter(s) that we read that day. We will collect at the end of the book for a grade.

98 3/7 Reflection Write a sequence of three events that surrounded Melba’s first day at Central High. Summary Sheet CH 4

99 Bell Ringer Multiple Meaning Words The term "multiple meaning words" is loosely applied to written words that can have more than one use or definition, and the intended use must be conveyed by the context, the other words in the sentence or paragraph. Homographs are words that are written the same, but have different meanings and word forms, and may have different pronunciations. This is common where words such as "dance" or "cut" share the same spelling for their noun and verb forms. Example : lead (the metal) and lead (the verb for going ahead). Without the sound difference, it may need to be clarified

100 3/8 Bell Ringer: 1)Read each sentence. 2)Write the homograph that best completes the sentence. 1.Can I go to the party (to, too, two)? 2.This is my favorite (pare, pair, pear) of jeans. 3.I (sent, scent, cent) a letter to my aunt in Vietnam.

101 3/7 Reflection Write a sequence of three events that surrounded Melba’s first day at Central High. Summary Sheet CH 4

102 Review Sheet 19 Due Friday! 1.B 2.D 3.B 4.B 5.B 6.C 7.A 8.D

103 Warriors Don’t Cry Reading Schedule DAYPAGESCHAPTERS Day Day Day Day Day Day Day Day Day Day end

104 Topic. Strand. Statement. Reading Nonfiction: 1.Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. 2.Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to supporting ideas; provide an objective summary of the text. 3.Analyze how a text makes connections among and distinctions between individuals, ideas, or events (e.g., through comparisons, analogies, or categories). 4.Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts. 5.Analyze in detail the structure of a specific paragraph in a text, including the role of particular sentences in developing and refining a key concept. 6.Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author acknowledges and responds to conflicting evidence or viewpoints. 7.Evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of using different mediums (e.g., print or digital text, video, multimedia) to present a particular topic or idea. 8.Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; recognize when irrelevant evidence is introduced. 9.Analyze a case in which two or more texts provide conflicting information on the same topic and identify where the texts disagree on matters of fact or interpretation. 10.By the end of the year, read and comprehend literary nonfiction at the high end of the grades 6-8 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

105 Carlotta Walls LaNier Is the oldest of three daughters, was born on December 18, 1942, in Little Rock, Arkansas. LaNier made history as the youngest member of the Little Rock Nine. Inspired by Rosa Parks, she had a desire to get the best education available by enrolling in Central High School. White students called her names and spat on her while armed guards escorted her to classes, but LaNier concentrated on her studies and protected herself throughout the school year. LaNier, along with all other Little Rock high school students, was barred from attending Central the next year when the Little Rock high schools were closed, but she returned to Central High and graduated in LaNier attended Michigan State University for two years before moving with her family to Denver. In 1968, she earned a Bachelor of Science from Colorado State College (now the University of Northern Colorado) and began working at the YWCA as a program administrator for teenagers. In 1977, she founded LaNier and Company, a real estate brokerage firm. Her experience in real estate includes everything from constructing and remodeling properties to marketing and selling them. LaNier is currently the president of the Little Rock Nine Foundation, a scholarship organization dedicated to ensuring equal access to education for African- Americans. She has also served as a trustee for the Iliff School of Theology. LaNier and her husband, Ira "Ike" LaNier, have two grown children.

106 OAA Prep Use the example of a 4 Point Answer to grade and assess the other three responses about Jane Goodall. Indentify – circle in the paragraph Explain/Support – underline in the paragraph Extra/Wrong – cross out

107 OAA Prep Helping Students Answer 2 and 4 Point Questions Helping Students Answer 2 and 4 Point Questions Box It! OAA Extended Response

108 OAA Prep – Box It! Read each 4 point question and underline the Action Words. After reading each question, set up a 4 Point Box for each question.

109 Warriors Don’t Cry CH 5 Open your book to Pages While reading, highlight/note the following: People/Characters – blue (2-4) Settings & Events – yellow (2-4) Figurative Language – pink (4-6) Important Info – green (1-2 per page) Unfamiliar word or concept - ?

110 Chapter 5 Guided Reading After reading, show me your annotations. Complete the Guided Reading Questions for Chapter 5. Turn in for a completion grade when finished.

111 Chapter 5

112 Warriors Don’t Cry CH 6 Open your book to Pages While reading, highlight/note the following: People/Characters – blue (1-3) Settings & Events – yellow (1-3) Figurative Language – pink (3-5) Important Info – green (1-2 per page) Unfamiliar word or concept - ?

113 Warriors Don’t Cry CH 6 You will placed in small groups to discuss your annotations. You make have some differences in the Important Events. Discuss the differences. However, your Figurative Language and Settings should be exact.

114 Double-Entry Journal 1.Imagine your are Melba, write a journal/diary entry about the way you felt waiting for integration to begin and the first day of trying to go to Central High. Show that you have read the book! Includes ideas and thoughts from the text! 2.Then write a personal reflection, question, or connection that relates to Melba. 3.You will share Melba’s journal entry with a partner to analyze the actions, thoughts, feelings or next move of Melba.

115 Warriors Don’t Cry Summary Sheet There is a box for all 18 Chapters. After answering your reflection, write a 20 word or less summary of the chapter(s) that we read that day. We will collect at the end of the book for a grade.

116 3/8 Reflection Describe the scene in the first picture in the middle of the book. Summary Sheet CH 5-6

117 Bell Ringer Multiple Meaning Words The term "multiple meaning words" is loosely applied to written words that can have more than one use or definition, and the intended use must be conveyed by the context, the other words in the sentence or paragraph. Homographs are words that are written the same, but have different meanings and word forms, and may have different pronunciations. This is common where words such as "dance" or "cut" share the same spelling for their noun and verb forms. Example : lead (the metal) and lead (the verb for going ahead). Without the sound difference, it may need to be clarified

118 3/11 Bell Ringer: 1)Read the paragraph. 2)Write the definition of how the word is used in context. 3)Write an alternate definition for the word. 1.Norman and Bella knew they were being followed. As they tried to bolt through the alley, they could hear the footsteps getting closer and closer. Norman panicked and wanted to shelter himself in the shadows, but Bella had a brilliant idea. She picked up a nearby stick, waved it at the dogs, and tossed it. They immediately went for it, and Norman and Bella walked away relieved.

119 3/8 Reflection Describe the scene in the first picture in the middle of the book. Summary Sheet CH 5-6

120 Review Sheet 20 Due Friday!

121 OAA Prep Helping Students Answer 2 and 4 Point Questions Helping Students Answer 2 and 4 Point Questions Box It! OAA Extended Response

122 OAA Prep – Box It! Read each 4 point question and underline the Action Words. After reading each question, set up a 4 Point Box for each question.

123 OAA Prep – Box It! Action Words:

124 OAA Prep – Extended Response Read the 4 Point Question and underline the Action Words. Read and annotate the selection. After reading the selection, set up a 4 Point Box for the 4 Point Question. Use your annotations and Box It to write a well thought answer.

125 Warriors Don’t Cry Reading Schedule DAYPAGESCHAPTERS Day Day Day Day Day Day Day Day Day end

126 Topic. Strand. Statement. Reading Nonfiction: 1.Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. 2.Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to supporting ideas; provide an objective summary of the text. 3.Analyze how a text makes connections among and distinctions between individuals, ideas, or events (e.g., through comparisons, analogies, or categories). 4.Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts. 5.Analyze in detail the structure of a specific paragraph in a text, including the role of particular sentences in developing and refining a key concept. 6.Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author acknowledges and responds to conflicting evidence or viewpoints. 7.Evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of using different mediums (e.g., print or digital text, video, multimedia) to present a particular topic or idea Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; recognize when irrelevant evidence is introduced Analyze a case in which two or more texts provide conflicting information on the same topic and identify where the texts disagree on matters of fact or interpretation. 10.By the end of the year, read and comprehend literary nonfiction at the high end of the grades 6-8 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

127 Terrence Roberts Born December 3, 1941, in Little Rock, Arkansas. Roberts was a sophomore at Horace Mann High School when he volunteered to integrate Little Rock's Central High School. When the city's high schools were closed to prevent further desegregation, Roberts moved to Los Angeles, California, and graduated from Los Angeles High School in Following his graduation from high school, Roberts attended California State University and was awarded a bachelor's degree in sociology in He went on to attend graduate school at the University of California at Los Angeles and received a master's degree in social welfare in In 1976, Roberts was awarded a Ph.D. from Southern Illinois University in psychology. Following his graduation from SIU, Roberts moved to the Napa Valley and directed the mental health unit of St. Helena Hospital in Deer Park, California, for ten years. After this, Roberts accepted an invitation to join the UCLA School of Social Welfare as assistant dean. In 1994, he took a position of department chair of the psychology program at Antioch University, Los Angeles. As demands on his time increased, Roberts became program co-chair to concentrate on the activities of his management consulting firm. Currently, he is a faculty member at Antioch and travels widely sought-after speaker and consultant. Roberts serves on the boards of the Economic Resources Center in Southern California, Pacific Oaks College in Pasadena, Eisenhower World Affairs Institute, and Little Rock Nine Foundation. He and his wife have two adult daughters and one grandson.

128 Warriors Don’t Cry CH 6 Open your book to Pages While reading, highlight/note the following: People/Characters – blue (1-3) Settings & Events – yellow (1-3) Figurative Language – pink (3-5) Important Info – green (1-2 per page) Unfamiliar word or concept - ?

129 Warriors Don’t Cry CH 6 You will placed in small groups to discuss your annotations. You make have some differences in the Important Events. Discuss the differences. However, your Figurative Language and Settings should be exact.

130 Double-Entry Journal 1.Imagine your are Melba, write a journal/diary entry about the way you felt waiting for integration to begin and the first day of trying to go to Central High. Show that you have read the book! Includes ideas and thoughts from the text! 2.Then write a personal reflection, question, or connection that relates to Melba. 3.You will share Melba’s journal entry with a partner to analyze the actions, thoughts, feelings or next move of Melba. You will need to wait to complete this part.

131 Warriors Don’t Cry CH 7 Open your book to Pages While reading, highlight/note the following: People/Characters – blue (6-8) Settings & Events – yellow (1-3) Figurative Language – pink (8-10) Important Info – green (1-2 per page) Unfamiliar word or concept - ?

132 Warriors Don’t Cry CH 7 Chapter 7 is 20 pages long. We will read the first 10 pages as a class, stopping every 2 pages to discuss the annotations. You will need to read the last 10 pages and annotate on you own. After annotating, show me your annotations to receive the next assignment.

133 Inferred past participle, past tense of in·fer Verb Deduce or conclude (information) from evidence and reasoning rather than from explicit statements.

134 Warriors Don’t Cry CH 7 Graphic Organizer Using the text, you will create a graphic representations of the 5 main concept, including explicit and inferred support. This will allow you to break down a text into the connections of support to main idea as well as visualize how the main idea is developed throughout the text.

135 Chapter 7 Main Ideas and Textual Support Directions: After reading and annotating Chapter 7, complete the graphic organizer below.

136 Chapter 7 Main Ideas and Textual Support Main Idea Explicit Support and Page # Inferred Support DANGEROUS TO GO TO CENTRAL HIGH CC MERCER AND FRANK SMITH ARE DRIVERS P. 70 NONWHITE REPORTERS ARE SCARED P. 70 TAKE A LONG, DIFFERENT ROUTE P. 71 MELBA CHASED 1 ST TIME. ALMOST RAPED AFTER NEWS.

137 Chapter 7 Main Ideas and Textual Support Main Idea Explicit Support and Page # Inferred Support DANGEROUS TO GO TO CENTRAL HIGH CC MERCER AND FRANK SMITH ARE DRIVERS P. 70 NONWHITE REPORTERS ARE SCARED P. 70 TAKE A LONG, DIFFERENT ROUTE P. 71 MELBA CHASED 1 ST TIME. ALMOST RAPED AFTER NEWS. MELBA IS CONSTANTLY BULLIED CALLED AT HOMECALLED RACIAL SLURS KICKED, SLAPPED, SPIT ON THERE IS RACIAL ISSUES IN THE SOUTH MELBA COULD BE IN DANGER AT SCHOOL KIDS IN GYM ARE THROWING THINGS AT HER MOMS CHASING HER GYM TEACHER TAKES CARE OF HER MELBA CHASED 1 ST TIME. ALMOST RAPED AFTER NEWS. FACED GOVERNMENT INTERVENTION FAUBUS BLOCKS ARRIVAL GOES TO COURT TROOPS ARE CALLED IN TO PROTECT PEOPLE DON’T WANT INTEGRATION ANGRY MOB OUTSIDE SCHOOL CHANTSFAUBUS BLOCKS WITH NATL GUARD KKK, JIM CROW, PLESSY V FERGUSON

138 Warriors Don’t Cry Summary Sheet There is a box for all 18 Chapters. After answering your reflection, write a 20 word or less summary of the chapter(s) that we read that day. We will collect at the end of the book for a grade.

139 3/11 Reflection Describe the attempts by Arkansas Governor Faubus to stop the integration of Little Rock Central High School. Summary Sheet CH 6

140 3/12 Reflection List three challenges that Melba faces during the integration of Central High. Summary Sheet CH 7

141 Bell Ringer Multiple Meaning Words The term "multiple meaning words" is loosely applied to written words that can have more than one use or definition, and the intended use must be conveyed by the context, the other words in the sentence or paragraph. Homographs are words that are written the same, but have different meanings and word forms, and may have different pronunciations. This is common where words such as "dance" or "cut" share the same spelling for their noun and verb forms. Example : lead (the metal) and lead (the verb for going ahead). Without the sound difference, it may need to be clarified

142 3/12 Bell Ringer: 1)Read each sentence. 2)Write the definition of how the word is used in context. 1.Please pass the salt. 2.Farming came to pass in the area. 3.Pass the ball to Rick!

143 3/13 Bell Ringer: 1)Read the news article. 2)Write the definition of how the word is used in context. Paul McCartney plays live to space crew Ex-Beatle plays two songs in first-ever concert linkup to the space station ANAHEIM, Calif. — It was "Good Day Sunshine" for the international space station crew Sunday morning. NASA astronaut Bill McArthur and Russian cosmonaut Valery Tokarev were 1. treated to a live wake-up call of the Beatles classic in a first-ever concert linkup to the space station. On Earth, former Beatle Sir Paul McCartney performed the 2. hit and another song, "English Tea," on Saturday night before a cheering crowd as part of his 11-week "US" tour. The performance was 3. beamed from the West Coast to the space station crew 220 miles above Earth and broadcast on NASA television, which showed live 4. feeds from space. McArthur and Tokarev 5. bobbed up and down and sipped from squeeze pouches through the show, getting a rousing cheer from the audience. "I can't believe that we're actually transmitting to 6. space!" McCartney said. "This is sensational. I love it."

144 3/11 Reflection Describe the attempts by Arkansas Governor Faubus to stop the integration of Little Rock Central High School. Summary Sheet CH 6

145 3/12 Reflection List three challenges that Melba faces during the integration of Central High. Summary Sheet CH 7

146 Topic. Strand. Statement. Reading Nonfiction: 1.Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. 2.Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to supporting ideas; provide an objective summary of the text. 3.Analyze how a text makes connections among and distinctions between individuals, ideas, or events (e.g., through comparisons, analogies, or categories). 4.Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts. 5.Analyze in detail the structure of a specific paragraph in a text, including the role of particular sentences in developing and refining a key concept. 6.Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author acknowledges and responds to conflicting evidence or viewpoints. 7.Evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of using different mediums (e.g., print or digital text, video, multimedia) to present a particular topic or idea Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; recognize when irrelevant evidence is introduced Analyze a case in which two or more texts provide conflicting information on the same topic and identify where the texts disagree on matters of fact or interpretation. 10.By the end of the year, read and comprehend literary nonfiction at the high end of the grades 6-8 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

147 OAA Prep Helping Students Answer 2 and 4 Point Questions Helping Students Answer 2 and 4 Point Questions Box It! OAA Extended Response

148 OAA Prep – Extended Response Size of Goodbye Read the 4 Point Question and underline the Action Words. Read and annotate the selection. After reading the selection, set up a 4 Point Box for the 4 Point Question. Use your annotations and Box It to write a well thought out answer.

149 Warriors Don’t Cry Free at Last – History of Civil Rights Rosewood Massacre – town in Florida is burned to the ground after a false accusation Medgar Evers Smithsonian Institute: Portrait of Medgar Evers Freedom Riders Did They Die in Vain? – chronicles the investigation of the slaying of three civil rights workers.

150 Rosewood, Florida For fear of being caught in an extra-marital affair, a white woman accused a black man of assaulting her. Whites across the town took up guns against the black residents and at least six black residents were killed in the violence. Many residents fled and/or were evacuated to nearby Gainesville. The town was burned to the ground and the only remains are a plaque.

151 Jefferson Thomas Born in 1942 in Little Rock, Arkansas. A quiet young man with a sense of humor, Thomas was a track athlete at Horace Mann High School when he chose to volunteer to integrate all-white Central High School for the school year as a sophomore. The Nine were harassed daily by white students, and Thomas' quiet demeanor made him a target for bullies at the school. He graduated from Central high School in 1960 and eventually became an accountant for the United States Department of Defense. Thomas is now retired.

152 Warriors Don’t Cry Reading Schedule DAYPAGESCHAPTERS Day Day Day Day Day Day Day Day end

153 Warriors Don’t Cry CH 8 Open your book to Pages While reading, highlight/note the following: People/Characters – blue (6-8) Settings & Events – yellow (1-3) Figurative Language – pink (2-4) Important Info – green (1-2 per page) Unfamiliar word or concept - ?

154 Chapter 8 We will read together. After each quote, stop and Foreshadow what will happen based on the quote provided. Quote from BookForeshadowing “I found Grandma snoring with the rifle laying across her lap.” p. 91 “There was an eerie hush over the crowd, not unlike the way I’d seen folks behave outside the home of the deceased before a funeral.” p. 93 “We’re not allowed to go inside the classrooms.” p. 97 Student Choice – find a quote, write it down, stop reading and foreshadow

155 Warriors Don’t Cry Summary Sheet There is a box for all 18 Chapters. After answering your reflection, write a 20 word or less summary of the chapter(s) that we read that day. We will collect at the end of the book for a grade.

156 3/13 Reflection Explain the importance of Thurgood Marshall to the Little Rock Nine and African-American people in general. Summary Sheet CH 7-8

157 Bell Ringer Multiple Meaning Words The term "multiple meaning words" is loosely applied to written words that can have more than one use or definition, and the intended use must be conveyed by the context, the other words in the sentence or paragraph. Homographs are words that are written the same, but have different meanings and word forms, and may have different pronunciations. This is common where words such as "dance" or "cut" share the same spelling for their noun and verb forms. Example : lead (the metal) and lead (the verb for going ahead). Without the sound difference, it may need to be clarified

158 3/14 Bell Ringer: 1)Read the paragraph. 2)Use context clues to write in the correct word. I turned eight years old on January 15th. For my birthday, my parents threw me a princess party. My mom let me help her _____________ a cake shaped like a princess. My dad even bought me a pretend tiara to _____________ on my head! “Today you can _____________ yourself as a real princess,” he said.

159 3/15 Bell Ringer: 1)Choose the word whose meanings fit both sentences. 1. I wish you wouldn’t ____ your voice. 1. How much money did we _____ for our new club? 2. What a difficult _____ she had with today’s math test. 2. At what _____ will you be home? 3. A statement should be followed by a _____. 3. The class _____ seemed to pass slowly.

160 3/13 Reflection Explain the importance of Thurgood Marshall to the Little Rock Nine and African-American people in general. Summary Sheet CH 8

161 Review Sheet 20 Due Friday! 1.D 2.D 3.B 4.B 5.D

162 Topic. Strand. Statement. Reading Nonfiction: 1.Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. 2.Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to supporting ideas; provide an objective summary of the text. 3.Analyze how a text makes connections among and distinctions between individuals, ideas, or events (e.g., through comparisons, analogies, or categories). 4.Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts. 5.Analyze in detail the structure of a specific paragraph in a text, including the role of particular sentences in developing and refining a key concept. 6.Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author acknowledges and responds to conflicting evidence or viewpoints. 7.Evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of using different mediums (e.g., print or digital text, video, multimedia) to present a particular topic or idea Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; recognize when irrelevant evidence is introduced Analyze a case in which two or more texts provide conflicting information on the same topic and identify where the texts disagree on matters of fact or interpretation. 10.By the end of the year, read and comprehend literary nonfiction at the high end of the grades 6-8 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

163 Free At Last Directions: While watching the video, identify the people below. You will use the definitions to have a brief class discussion after the video.

164 Free At Last 1.Why was segregation still practiced in southern states in the middle of the 20th century, despite the passage of constitutional amendments prohibiting segregation following the Civil War? To what extent were things different in northern states, and why? 2.Why does racism still exist? What are some of the steps that would be necessary to eliminate racism, not only in the United States, but also in other parts of the world? 3.What was the impact of the 1954 Supreme Court decision Brown v. Board of Education on life in the United States? Discuss the implications of this decision for the martyrs of the civil rights movement. Consider whether this decision continues to have an effect on civil rights in America.

165 Gloria Cecelia Ray Born September 26, 1942, in Little Rock. She was the third child of H.C. Ray, Sr. and Julia Miller Ray. Mr. Ray was already a retired federal employee when Gloria entered Central High (he was born 1889, the son of a former slave). In the beginning of the century, it was he who founded the Arkansas Agricultural Extension Service for Negroes under the auspices of the US Dept of Agriculture; he had also studied and work for none other than the distinguished George Washington Carver and Booker T. Washington, before graduating from Tuskegee Institute. These facts strongly influenced Ray's choice to attend Central High School. She was 14 years old when she finished Dunbar Junior High School and registered to attend Central for her sophmore year. Ray, like the others of the Nine, was tormented by certain whitestudents who called her names, threw things, spit, vandalized her locker, and even pushed her down a flight of stairs. Still, like the others, she was determined to finish the year. In 1966, Gloria Ray married Krister Karlmark, a professor at the Institute of Design in Chicago. The same year, she joined the IIT Research Institute as Assistant Mathematician on the APT IV (robotics) project. After graduating as patent attorney from Kungliga Patent in Stockholm, 1977, Ray Karlmark worked for IBM International Patent Operations as European Patent Attorney until 1981, when she moved to Belgium, and began working for N.V. Philips as CAD/CAM and Technical Product Documentation Specialist. From 1976 to 1994, Ray Karlmark founded and served as Editor-in-Chief of Computers in Industry, an international journal of practice and experience of computer applications in industry.

166 Warriors Don’t Cry Reading Schedule DAYPAGESCHAPTERS Day Day Day Day Day Day Day end

167 Warriors Don’t Cry CH 9 Open your book to Pages While reading, highlight/note the following: People/Characters – blue (6-8) Settings & Events – yellow (1-3) Figurative Language – pink (5-7) Important Info – green (1-2 per page) Unfamiliar word or concept - ?

168 Chapter 9 Paired Annotating 1.Read 2 pages silently. 2.Stop. Annotate with partner. 3.Repeat above steps. Guided Reading After reading, show me your annotations. Complete the Guided Reading Questions for Chapter 9. Turn in for a completion grade when finished.

169 Warriors Don’t Cry CH 10 Open your book to Pages While reading, highlight/note the following: People/Characters – blue (2-4) Settings & Events – yellow (1-3) Figurative Language – pink (3-5) Important Info – green (1-2 per page) Unfamiliar word or concept - ?

170 Chapter 10 Guided Reading After reading, show me your annotations. Complete the Guided Reading Questions for Chapter 10. Turn in for a completion grade when finished.

171 Chapter 10 After reading and annotating, complete the Sequence of Events Chart. On the back, use your Pink Highlights to identify three similes and/or metaphors. Analyze the figurative language in the space provided.

172 3/15 Reflection Describe what Danny symbolizes to Melba. Summary Sheet CH 9-10

173 Bell Ringer Multiple Meaning Words The term "multiple meaning words" is loosely applied to written words that can have more than one use or definition, and the intended use must be conveyed by the context, the other words in the sentence or paragraph. Homographs are words that are written the same, but have different meanings and word forms, and may have different pronunciations. This is common where words such as "dance" or "cut" share the same spelling for their noun and verb forms. Example : lead (the metal) and lead (the verb for going ahead). Without the sound difference, it may need to be clarified

174 3/18 Bell Ringer: 1)Read each sentence. 2)Use context clues to define the bold word. 1.The one-hundred piece puzzle was of a picture of a castle. 2.I received a grade of a B on the essay. 3.Josh played in a summer baseball league.

175 3/15 Reflection Describe what Danny symbolizes to Melba. Summary Sheet CH 9-10

176 Review Sheet 21 Due Friday!

177 Topic. Strand. Statement. Reading Nonfiction: 1.Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. 2.Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to supporting ideas; provide an objective summary of the text. 3.Analyze how a text makes connections among and distinctions between individuals, ideas, or events (e.g., through comparisons, analogies, or categories). 4.Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts. 5.Analyze in detail the structure of a specific paragraph in a text, including the role of particular sentences in developing and refining a key concept. 6.Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author acknowledges and responds to conflicting evidence or viewpoints. 7.Evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of using different mediums (e.g., print or digital text, video, multimedia) to present a particular topic or idea Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; recognize when irrelevant evidence is introduced Analyze a case in which two or more texts provide conflicting information on the same topic and identify where the texts disagree on matters of fact or interpretation. 10.By the end of the year, read and comprehend literary nonfiction at the high end of the grades 6-8 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

178 OAA Prep Helping Students Answer 2 and 4 Point Questions Helping Students Answer 2 and 4 Point Questions Box It! OAA Extended Response

179 OAA Prep – Extended Response The Woods of Minnesota 1.Read the 4 Point Question and underline the Action Words. 2.Read and annotate the selection. 3.After reading the selection, set up a 4 Point Box for the 4 Point Question. 4.Use your annotations and Box It to write a well thought out answer. 5.Use the rubric to grade your own. 6.Write an explanation to support your score.

180 Warriors Don’t Cry Reading Schedule DAYPAGESCHAPTERS Day Day Day Day Day Day end

181 Warriors Don’t Cry CH 11 Open your book to Pages While reading, highlight/note the following: People/Characters – blue (8-10) Settings & Events – yellow (1-2) Figurative Language – pink (2-4) Important Info – green (1-2 per page) Unfamiliar word or concept - ?

182 Chapter 11 Read and annotate Pages Slide your desk over to a neighbor’s. We use Paired Reading to complete this section of Chapter 11. Instead of giving an oral summary after reading, you and your partner will annotate together. Step 1: Each partner silently read 1-2 pages. Step 2: Discuss and Annotate

183 Chapter 11 After reading and showing your annotations, complete the Chapter 11 Guided Reading. Turn in when done.

184 Chapter 11 Read pages and annotate. Draw the Cause and Effect chart on the next slide in your notebook. Use your annotations to complete. Turn in for a Comprehension Grade.

185 Chapter 11 Cause 1 Cause 4Cause 3 Cause 2 Ender & Bonzo are rivals Inference: Textual Support:

186 3/18 Reflection What was the name of the man in charge of the FBI? Summary Sheet CH 11

187 Bell Ringer Multiple Meaning Words The term "multiple meaning words" is loosely applied to written words that can have more than one use or definition, and the intended use must be conveyed by the context, the other words in the sentence or paragraph. Homographs are words that are written the same, but have different meanings and word forms, and may have different pronunciations. This is common where words such as "dance" or "cut" share the same spelling for their noun and verb forms. Example : lead (the metal) and lead (the verb for going ahead). Without the sound difference, it may need to be clarified

188 3/19 Bell Ringer: 1)Read each sentence. 2)Use context clues to define the bold word. 1.Please close the door. I like to eat poop. There is quite a draft! 2.If you get there early, please reserve a seat for Damien. 3.Our math teacher taught us how to find a square root.

189 3/18 Reflection What was the name of the man in charge of the FBI? Summary Sheet CH 11

190 Topic. Strand. Statement. Reading Nonfiction: 1.Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. 2.Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to supporting ideas; provide an objective summary of the text. 3.Analyze how a text makes connections among and distinctions between individuals, ideas, or events (e.g., through comparisons, analogies, or categories). 4.Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts. 5.Analyze in detail the structure of a specific paragraph in a text, including the role of particular sentences in developing and refining a key concept. 6.Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author acknowledges and responds to conflicting evidence or viewpoints. 7.Evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of using different mediums (e.g., print or digital text, video, multimedia) to present a particular topic or idea Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; recognize when irrelevant evidence is introduced Analyze a case in which two or more texts provide conflicting information on the same topic and identify where the texts disagree on matters of fact or interpretation. 10.By the end of the year, read and comprehend literary nonfiction at the high end of the grades 6-8 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

191 Warriors Don’t Cry Reading Schedule DAYPAGESCHAPTERS Day Day Day Day Day end

192 Warriors Don’t Cry CH 12 Open your book to Pages While reading, highlight/note the following: People/Characters – blue (4-6) Settings & Events – yellow (1-2) Figurative Language – pink (2-4) Important Info – green (1-2 per page) Unfamiliar word or concept - ?

193 Chapter 12 Open your book to page Read Chapter 12 silently. After reading and annotating, complete the Funnel Graphic. Write down the three most important ideas in the chapter. Use those three ideas to write a one sentence summary of the chapter. Combine all 3 ideas. Use a comma. No run-ons.

194 Chapter 12 Most Important Ideas

195 Chapter 12 Summary

196 Warriors Don’t Cry CH 13 Open your book to Pages While reading, highlight/note the following: People/Characters – blue (2-4) Settings & Events – yellow (1-2) Figurative Language – pink (2-4) Important Info – green (1-2 per page) Unfamiliar word or concept - ?

197 Chapter 13 Read and annotate Pages Writing Activity 1.On the back of “Seeing the Big Picture,” complete the following. 2.MLA heading at the top. 3.Give a one sentence summary of Chapter 13 at the top of your paper. 4.Draw a large stick figure. 5.Choose a person from the chapter and write their name on the head of the stick figure. 6.For the arms and hands, write 4 Ideas or Events that have an impact/importance on that character. 7.For the legs and feet, write down 4 ways your character influences others.

198 Chapter 13 One sentence summary of Chapter 13. Melba Pattillo Melba… Arms and Hands – Important events that happened to character (4) Legs and Feet – How character influences others (4)

199 3/19 Reflection Explain what Melba meant in the quote, “Tonight I feel love from my own people.” Summary Sheet CH 12-13

200 Bell Ringer Multiple Meaning Words The term "multiple meaning words" is loosely applied to written words that can have more than one use or definition, and the intended use must be conveyed by the context, the other words in the sentence or paragraph. Homographs are words that are written the same, but have different meanings and word forms, and may have different pronunciations. This is common where words such as "dance" or "cut" share the same spelling for their noun and verb forms. Example : lead (the metal) and lead (the verb for going ahead). Without the sound difference, it may need to be clarified

201 3/20 Bell Ringer: 1)Choose the word whose meanings fit both sentences. 1. You should always _____ an agreement with a handshake. 1. Be sure you _____ the plastic storage bag, so it won’t leak. 2. He hurt his _____ when he ran into the door. 2. Try to put this thread through the _____ of that needle. 3. Gasoline, oil, and diesel fuel are all _____ from petroleum. 3. Mrs. Dupont came from an old, rich and _____ family

202 3/19 Reflection Explain what Melba meant in the quote, “Tonight I feel love from my own people.” Summary Sheet CH 12-13

203 Topic. Strand. Statement. Reading Nonfiction: 1.Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. 2.Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to supporting ideas; provide an objective summary of the text. 3.Analyze how a text makes connections among and distinctions between individuals, ideas, or events (e.g., through comparisons, analogies, or categories). 4.Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts. 5.Analyze in detail the structure of a specific paragraph in a text, including the role of particular sentences in developing and refining a key concept. 6.Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author acknowledges and responds to conflicting evidence or viewpoints. 7.Evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of using different mediums (e.g., print or digital text, video, multimedia) to present a particular topic or idea Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; recognize when irrelevant evidence is introduced Analyze a case in which two or more texts provide conflicting information on the same topic and identify where the texts disagree on matters of fact or interpretation. 10.By the end of the year, read and comprehend literary nonfiction at the high end of the grades 6-8 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

204 Warriors Don’t Cry Reading Schedule DAYPAGESCHAPTERS Day Day Day Day end

205 Warriors Don’t Cry CH 14 Open your book to Pages While reading, highlight/note the following: People/Characters – blue (4-6) Settings & Events – yellow (1-2) Figurative Language – pink (2-4) Important Info – green (1-2 per page) Unfamiliar word or concept - ?

206 Chapter 14 Storyboard Sequence After reading and annotating, complete the sequence of events activity. Complete the “Note” under each drawing to explain your picture. Use textual evidence in your “Note.” Use the breakdown below to create your storyboard. 1.Pages Pages Pages Pages Pages Pages

207 3/20 Reflection Why did Melba wish she was dead? Support with two pieces of textual evidence. Summary Sheet CH 14

208 Bell Ringer Multiple Meaning Words The term "multiple meaning words" is loosely applied to written words that can have more than one use or definition, and the intended use must be conveyed by the context, the other words in the sentence or paragraph. Homographs are words that are written the same, but have different meanings and word forms, and may have different pronunciations. This is common where words such as "dance" or "cut" share the same spelling for their noun and verb forms. Example : lead (the metal) and lead (the verb for going ahead). Without the sound difference, it may need to be clarified

209 3/21 Bell Ringer: 1)Choose the word whose meanings fit both sentences. 1. May I borrow your ____? 1. One of the pigs got out of the ____! 2. What is the ____ of the story? 2. ____ to the one you want. 3. ____ a sharp knife carefully. 3. The ____ of my suitcase broke.

210 3/20 Reflection Why did Melba wish she was dead? Support with two pieces of textual evidence. Summary Sheet CH 14

211 Topic. Strand. Statement. Reading Nonfiction: 1.Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. 2.Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to supporting ideas; provide an objective summary of the text. 3.Analyze how a text makes connections among and distinctions between individuals, ideas, or events (e.g., through comparisons, analogies, or categories). 4.Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts. 5.Analyze in detail the structure of a specific paragraph in a text, including the role of particular sentences in developing and refining a key concept. 6.Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author acknowledges and responds to conflicting evidence or viewpoints. 7.Evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of using different mediums (e.g., print or digital text, video, multimedia) to present a particular topic or idea Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; recognize when irrelevant evidence is introduced Analyze a case in which two or more texts provide conflicting information on the same topic and identify where the texts disagree on matters of fact or interpretation. 10.By the end of the year, read and comprehend literary nonfiction at the high end of the grades 6-8 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

212 Warriors Don’t Cry Reading Schedule DAYPAGESCHAPTERS Day Day Day end

213 Warriors Don’t Cry CH 15 Open your book to Pages While reading, highlight/note the following: People/Characters – blue (3-5) Settings & Events – yellow (1-2) Figurative Language – pink (6-8) Important Info – green (1-2 per page) Unfamiliar word or concept - ?

214 Chapter 15 - Conflict Conflict – struggle against opposing forces Two Types 1.Internal – takes place within the character. Can be a struggle against needs, desires, or emotions. 2.External – struggle with outside forces, like other people, groups, values/agendas, or something unseen.

215 Chapter 15 After reading and annotating, complete the Conflict Chart about Melba, Lois and Link. 2 conflicts per character. You can use internal or external conflicts that they faced in Chapter 15. Complete “Seeing the Big Picture,” summarizing Chapter 15. Use textual evidence as Supporting Details. You may want to write Main Idea/Summary first, then support with textual evidence.

216 Annotating Helps! Use your annotations to help you complete the Literary Elements Chart. Literary Elements Main IdeasCharacterSettingToneSymbolism Example 1 Page and Paragraph

217 Chapter 15 Q.U.A.D. Quote It. Understand It. Answer It. Draw It. Choose four separate events from the chapter. Fold a piece of recycled paper into quarters and complete the following: You will use a Quote AND page number from the book to show Event 1. Understand/Analyze Event 2 and make an Inference on how it will affect Ender. You will Answer/explain Event 3. You will Draw a scene of Event 4. TURN IN WHEN FINISHED!

218 Review Sheet 21 Due Friday!

219 3/21 Reflection Where did Link tell Melba to drop off his car? What were some second thoughts that Melba had about doing so? Summary Sheet CH 15

220 Bell Ringer Multiple Meaning Words The term "multiple meaning words" is loosely applied to written words that can have more than one use or definition, and the intended use must be conveyed by the context, the other words in the sentence or paragraph. Homographs are words that are written the same, but have different meanings and word forms, and may have different pronunciations. This is common where words such as "dance" or "cut" share the same spelling for their noun and verb forms. Example : lead (the metal) and lead (the verb for going ahead). Without the sound difference, it may need to be clarified

221 3/22 Bell Ringer: 1)Choose the word whose meanings fit both sentences. 1. Be careful so you won’t ____ over the toys. 1. Are you taking a ____ this summer? 2. This tree provides lots of ____. 2. Please pull down the window ____. 3. It’s not ____ that you get all the cookies! 3. I rode a roller coaster at the ____

222 3/21 Reflection Where did Link tell Melba to drop off his car? What were some second thoughts that Melba had about doing so? Summary Sheet CH 15

223 Review Sheet 21 Due Friday! 1.D 2.A 3.A 4.B 5.A

224 Topic. Strand. Statement. Reading Nonfiction: 1.Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. 2.Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to supporting ideas; provide an objective summary of the text. 3.Analyze how a text makes connections among and distinctions between individuals, ideas, or events (e.g., through comparisons, analogies, or categories). 4.Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts. 5.Analyze in detail the structure of a specific paragraph in a text, including the role of particular sentences in developing and refining a key concept. 6.Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author acknowledges and responds to conflicting evidence or viewpoints. 7.Evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of using different mediums (e.g., print or digital text, video, multimedia) to present a particular topic or idea Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; recognize when irrelevant evidence is introduced Analyze a case in which two or more texts provide conflicting information on the same topic and identify where the texts disagree on matters of fact or interpretation. 10.By the end of the year, read and comprehend literary nonfiction at the high end of the grades 6-8 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

225 Common Assessment #8 1.Read each question completely. 2.Circle the action words. 3.Read and annotate the selection, Albert. 4.Set up a 4 point and 2 point Box It. 5.Fill in the boxes for your pre-writing activity. 6.Answer the questions on a sheet of paper. 7.Turn in your boxes and answers. Point Breakdown 4 Point Question 2 Point Question 4 Points for Box It

226 Warriors Don’t Cry Reading Schedule DAYPAGESCHAPTERS Day Day end

227 Warriors Don’t Cry CH 16 Open your book to Pages While reading, highlight/note the following: People/Characters – blue (3-5) Settings & Events – yellow (1-2) Figurative Language – pink (2-4) Important Info – green (1-2 per page) Unfamiliar word or concept - ?

228 Chapter 16 Character’s World Find parallels/similarities between you, Melba and Link. Describe something that happens to Melba or Link in Chapter 16. Then describe a related situation that has happened to you.

229 Chapter 16 Be a Reporter Write a summary of Chapter 16 using a news article format. Include: 1.Who 2.What 3.When 4.Where 5.Why 6.How

230 Warriors Don’t Cry CH 17 Open your book to Pages While reading, highlight/note the following: People/Characters – blue (3-5) Settings & Events – yellow (1-2) Figurative Language – pink (6-8) Important Info – green (1-2 per page) Unfamiliar word or concept - ?

231 Warriors Don’t Cry CH 17 After reading and annotating, show me your annotations. “Step Back in Time” Use factual information from the book, videos, and class discussions to show the time period. “Pleased to Meet You” Pick a character from Chapter 17. Use 2-3 facts from the Chapter/Book for each question

232 Warriors Don’t Cry CH 18 Open your book to Pages While reading, highlight/note the following: People/Characters – blue (6-8) Settings & Events – yellow (3-5) Figurative Language – pink (2-4) Important Info – green (1-2 per page) Unfamiliar word or concept - ?

233 Warriors Don’t Cry CH 18 After reading and annotating, show me your annotations. “The Big Picture” Answer each question using factual information from the chapter/book. “Life’s Building Blocks” Causes – list 2-3 events that shaped Melba Effects – how did those causes change Melba

234 Common Assessment #9 You need: 1.Book 2.Pencil 3.Test 4.Scantron You can: 1.Use your book and annotations 2.Annotate on the test if needed Turn in test, Scantron and Summary Sheet when done Book is yours

235 3/22 Reflection List 2-3 reasons why you think Link is helping Melba. Summary Sheet CH 16-17

236 Bell Ringer Multiple Meaning Words The term "multiple meaning words" is loosely applied to written words that can have more than one use or definition, and the intended use must be conveyed by the context, the other words in the sentence or paragraph. Homographs are words that are written the same, but have different meanings and word forms, and may have different pronunciations. This is common where words such as "dance" or "cut" share the same spelling for their noun and verb forms. Example : lead (the metal) and lead (the verb for going ahead). Without the sound difference, it may need to be clarified

237 4/2 Bell Ringer: 1)Choose two of the three word. 2)Write two sentences for each word. 3)Make sure each sentence shows a different meaning of the word. pound ring trip

238 3/22 Reflection List 2-3 reasons why you think Link is helping Melba. Summary Sheet CH 16-17

239 Topic. Strand. Statement. Writing: Text Types and Purposes Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content. a.Introduce a topic clearly, previewing what is to follow; organize ideas, concepts, and information into broader categories; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., charts, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension. b.Develop the topic with relevant, well-chosen facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples. c.Use appropriate and varied transitions to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among ideas and concepts. d.Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic. e.Establish and maintain a formal style. f.Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented.

240 Ruby Bridges Ruby was 6 years old when she was chosen to integrate her New Orleans, LA elementary school. Ruby was the only African-American student in her school. She had to be escorted to class by Federal Marshalls. She is still considered a champion for Civil Rights and is one of the most influential people of the era.

241 Civil Rights Writing Prompt Compare and contrast the situation and treatment of Melba Pattillo Beals and Ruby Bridges. Include textual evidence from your book and incidents from the video. Use historical facts from the time period to support your similarities and differences.

242 Ruby and Melba Melba Pattillo BealsRuby Bridges

243 Ruby and Melba Melba Pattillo Beals Little Rock Nine Spit on and called names Friends with Link Nine African-Americans in Central High 15 years old Protected by 101 st Airborne Death threats Arkansas Didn’t retaliate Ruby Bridges 6 years old New Orleans, LA Elementary school

244 Ruby Bridges Video Ruby’s Background Historical Info Treatment Outcome Main IdeaInfo About

245 4/2 Reflection List two similarities and one difference between WDC and the Ruby Bridges video. Keep your book. Recycle all papers from WDC.

246 Bell Ringer Multiple Meaning Words The term "multiple meaning words" is loosely applied to written words that can have more than one use or definition, and the intended use must be conveyed by the context, the other words in the sentence or paragraph. Homographs are words that are written the same, but have different meanings and word forms, and may have different pronunciations. This is common where words such as "dance" or "cut" share the same spelling for their noun and verb forms. Example : lead (the metal) and lead (the verb for going ahead). Without the sound difference, it may need to be clarified

247 4/3 Bell Ringer: 1)Choose two of the three word. 2)Write two sentences for each word. 3)Make sure each sentence shows a different meaning of the word. BugSpring Pitcher

248 4/2 Reflection List two similarities and one difference between WDC and the Ruby Bridges video. Keep your book. Recycle all papers from WDC.

249 Topic. Strand. Statement. Writing: Text Types and Purposes Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content. a.Introduce a topic clearly, previewing what is to follow; organize ideas, concepts, and information into broader categories; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., charts, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension. b.Develop the topic with relevant, well-chosen facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples. c.Use appropriate and varied transitions to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among ideas and concepts. d.Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic. e.Establish and maintain a formal style. f.Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented.

250 Ruby Bridges Video Ruby’s Background Historical Info Treatment Outcome Main IdeaInfo About

251 Ruby Bridges Bio Read and annotate the biography about Ruby Bridges. You don’t need to use highlighters. Make a note or two per paragraph. As you read, focus on ideas that you want to use in your essay. Pay attention to differences in the movie and the biography page.

252 The Problem We All Must Live With

253 Ruby and Melba Ruby Melba Both

254 Ruby and Melba Ruby MelbaBoth

255 Civil Rights Writing Prompt Compare and contrast the situation and treatment of Melba Pattillo Beals and Ruby Bridges. Include textual evidence from your book and incidents from the video. Use historical facts from the time period to support your similarities and differences.

256 4/3 Reflection Describe 2-3 challenges that Ruby had to overcome. Keep your book. Recycle all papers from WDC.

257 Bell Ringer Multiple Meaning Words The term "multiple meaning words" is loosely applied to written words that can have more than one use or definition, and the intended use must be conveyed by the context, the other words in the sentence or paragraph. Homographs are words that are written the same, but have different meanings and word forms, and may have different pronunciations. This is common where words such as "dance" or "cut" share the same spelling for their noun and verb forms. Example : lead (the metal) and lead (the verb for going ahead). Without the sound difference, it may need to be clarified

258 4/4 Bell Ringer: 1)Choose two of the three word. 2)Write two sentences for each word. 3)Make sure each sentence shows a different meaning of the word. CaseMintPatient

259 4/3 Reflection Describe 2-3 challenges that Ruby had to overcome. Keep your book. Recycle all papers from WDC.

260 Topic. Strand. Statement. Writing: Text Types and Purposes Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content. a.Introduce a topic clearly, previewing what is to follow; organize ideas, concepts, and information into broader categories; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., charts, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension. b.Develop the topic with relevant, well-chosen facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples. c.Use appropriate and varied transitions to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among ideas and concepts. d.Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic. e.Establish and maintain a formal style. f.Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented.

261 Ruby and Melba Ruby MelbaBoth

262 Some Common English Transition Words and Phrases Adversative Transitions: These transitions are used to signal conflict, contradiction, concession, dismissal… Additive Transitions: These show addition, introduction, similarity to other ideas… Causal Transitions: These transitions signal cause/effect and reason/result... Sequential Transitions: These transitions are used to signal a chronological or logical sequence.

263 Transitions Partner with your neighbor. Read Goldilocks and the Three Bears. Use the transitions below to complete the story. SoMeanwhileNext Suddenly ThenBy now LastlyAt this First

264 Goldilocks Answers So Meanwhile First Then or Lastly Next or Then Then By now Suddenly

265 Transitions Partner with a different neighbor. Re-read Goldilocks and the Three Bears. Use the transitions below to complete the story. Try to use the transitions once. ConsequentlySimultaneously By this time Finally Initially Immediately Not surprisingly

266 Goldilocks Answers Round 2 Consequently Simultaneously Initially Finally Not surprisingly Consequently By this time Immediately

267 Goldilocks and the Three Transitions Why did we complete the same activity with two different sets of transitions? What point was I trying to prove? Why are transitions important? Why is the advantage of using varied/different transitions?

268 Transition Words Chronological (words about the order of things) First, second, third Next, then After Following Cause-Effect (words about things which make other things happen) So, thus Therefore, hence Consequently Due to Example (words to show what a thing is) One such, another For instance, for example Addition (words that add more information) Similarly, additionally Another Also Moreover Opposition (words that signal a conflict or problem) But, though, however On the other hand Conversely Yet Nonetheless, nevertheless

269 Write a short opinion “essay” using at least 3 transition words. For your essay, come up with at least three reasons to persuade the reader. Thesis, support, support, support, and conclusion. 1)Who is the best singer/writer/dancer/performer/athlete? 2)What is the best sport for losing weight? 3)What is the best cartoon on television? 4)Which is better, chocolate or vanilla? 5)What is the best kind of music? 6)Who is the greatest person to have ever lived? 7)Which kind of animal makes the best pet? 8)Which is more beautiful, sunrise or sunset? 9)Which is more important, the ability to speak well or write well? 10)Is it better to be an only child or to have brothers and/or sisters?

270 Review Sheet 22 Due Friday!

271 4/4 Reflection Why is using transition words in your writing important? Keep your book. Recycle all papers from WDC.

272 Bell Ringer Multiple Meaning Words The term "multiple meaning words" is loosely applied to written words that can have more than one use or definition, and the intended use must be conveyed by the context, the other words in the sentence or paragraph. Homographs are words that are written the same, but have different meanings and word forms, and may have different pronunciations. This is common where words such as "dance" or "cut" share the same spelling for their noun and verb forms. Example : lead (the metal) and lead (the verb for going ahead). Without the sound difference, it may need to be clarified

273 4/5 Bell Ringer: 1)Choose two of the three word. 2)Write two sentences for each word. 3)Make sure each sentence shows a different meaning of the word. GroundHatchGrave

274 Review Sheet 22 Due Friday! 1.A 2.A 3.C 4.A

275 4/4 Reflection Why is using transition words in your writing important? Keep your book. Recycle all papers from WDC.

276 Topic. Strand. Statement. Writing: Text Types and Purposes Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content. a.Introduce a topic clearly, previewing what is to follow; organize ideas, concepts, and information into broader categories; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., charts, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension. b.Develop the topic with relevant, well-chosen facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples. c.Use appropriate and varied transitions to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among ideas and concepts. d.Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic. e.Establish and maintain a formal style. f.Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented.

277 Civil Rights Writing Prompt Compare and contrast the situation and treatment of Melba Pattillo Beals and Ruby Bridges. Include textual evidence from your book and incidents from the video. Use historical facts from the time period to support your similarities and differences.

278 Graphic Organizer 1. Introduction a.Hook – Get the reader involved using interesting fact, quote, or statementHook b.Connect hook to topic – c.Background Info – Venn, movie notes, and book d.Thesis – based on writing prompt “Compare and contrast the situation and treatment of Melba Pattillo Beals and Ruby Bridges.”

279 Ruby and Melba Ruby MelbaBoth

280 Graphic Organizer 2-4. Body Paragraphs a.Transition & Topic Sentence – similarity, difference, difference. Pick the correct transition. b.Introduce Quote – set up your quote with a fact c.Quote – “obvious explanation” (122). d.Explain Quote’s importance – connect b & c

281 Graphic Organizer 5. Conclusion a.Restate Thesis – remind reader about your topic b.Restate Main Ideas – brief summary c.Leave the reader - optional

282 Find an editorial from your local newspaper Read the essay. 1.Underline the transition words. Think about which category each transition word would fit into (chronological, cause-effect, etc.) 2.Now, take the transition words OUT of the essay (you can use a pen to cross them out or cover them with small pieces of tape or post-it notes). Read the essay again. 1.What happens when the transition words are taken out? 2.Does the essay sound funny or bad? 3.Why do you think this is the case?

283 4/5 Reflection List three facts from our study of Civil Rights and integration that you learned. Keep your book. Recycle all papers from WDC.

284 Bell Ringer Multiple Meaning Words The term "multiple meaning words" is loosely applied to written words that can have more than one use or definition, and the intended use must be conveyed by the context, the other words in the sentence or paragraph. Homographs are words that are written the same, but have different meanings and word forms, and may have different pronunciations. This is common where words such as "dance" or "cut" share the same spelling for their noun and verb forms. Example : lead (the metal) and lead (the verb for going ahead). Without the sound difference, it may need to be clarified

285 4/5 Bell Ringer: 1)Choose two of the three word. 2)Write two sentences for each word. 3)Make sure each sentence shows a different meaning of the word. BuckleCoachChannel

286 4/5 Reflection List three facts from our study of Civil Rights and integration that you learned. Keep your book. Recycle all papers from WDC.

287 Topic. Strand. Statement. Writing: Text Types and Purposes Evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of using different mediums (e.g., print or digital text, video, multimedia) to present a particular topic or idea. Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; recognize when irrelevant evidence is introduced. Analyze a case in which two or more texts provide conflicting information on the same topic and identify where the texts disagree on matters of fact or interpretation.

288 Integration Two Minute Free Write: “What did I learn about integration from WDC, Ruby Bridges and Remember the Titans?”

289 Remember the Titans I will read an article about the “true” story of Remember the Titans. Use the information in it to start your Venn Diagram. After using the article for your Venn, bring it to me and you will read Questioning the Story and complete the Venn Diagram. Complete the Venn Diagram that compares and contrasts the movie to the story. Your Venn needs 15 total items.

290 Fact or Fiction? Movie Both Reading

291 Author’s Purpose List 3-5 major differences between the movie and the “real” story. Explain why the director of the film would change, leave out and alter the events.


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