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The Education Trust, 2003 Don’t Turn Back The Clock OPENING PLENARY: Kati Haycock, Director, The Education Trust.

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Presentation on theme: "The Education Trust, 2003 Don’t Turn Back The Clock OPENING PLENARY: Kati Haycock, Director, The Education Trust."— Presentation transcript:

1 The Education Trust, 2003 Don’t Turn Back The Clock OPENING PLENARY: Kati Haycock, Director, The Education Trust

2 The Education Trust, 2003 Where Are We Now? NAEP 4th Grade Reading All Students, 2002

3 The Education Trust, 2003 By Race, Ethnicity 4th Grade Reading 2002

4 The Education Trust, 2003 By Family Income 4th Grade Reading 2002

5 The Education Trust, 2003 Where Are We Now? NAEP 8th Grade Mathematics All Students 2000

6 The Education Trust, 2003 NAEP 8th Grade Mathematics Race, Ethnicity 2000

7 The Education Trust, 2003 Progress Over Time?

8 The Education Trust, 2003 Gaps Narrow NAEP Reading 17 Year-Olds Source: US Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics. NAEP 1999 Trends in Academic Progress (p. 107) Washington, DC: US Department of Education, August 2000

9 The Education Trust, 2003 Gaps Narrow NAEP Math Scores, 13 Year-Olds Source: US Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics. NAEP 1999 Trends in Academic Progress (p. 108) Washington, DC: US Department of Education, August 2000

10 The Education Trust, 2003 Between , that progress came to a halt…and gaps began to widen once again.

11 The Education Trust, 2003 Source: US Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics. NAEP 1999 Trends in Academic Progress (p. 108) Washington, DC: US Department of Education, August 2000 Gaps Narrow, Then Hold Steady or Widen: NAEP Math Scores, 17 Year-Olds 20 32

12 The Education Trust, 2003 After 1988, Gaps Mostly Widen NAEP Reading, 17 Year-Olds Source: US Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics. NAEP 1999 Trends in Academic Progress (p. 107) Washington, DC: US Department of Education, August

13 The Education Trust, 2003 AT END OF HIGH SCHOOL?

14 The Education Trust, 2003 African American and Latino 17 Year Olds Do Math at Same Levels As White 13 Year Olds Source: NAEP 1999 Long Term Trends Summary Tables (online)

15 The Education Trust, 2003 African American and Latino 17 Year Olds Read at Same Levels as White 13 Year Olds Source: Source: NAEP 1999 Long Term Trends Summary Tables (online)

16 The Education Trust, 2003 ADD IT ALL UP... ADD IT ALL UP...

17 The Education Trust, 2003 Of Every 100 White Kindergartners: (25-to 29-Year-Olds) Source: US Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. March Current Population Surveys, , in The Condition of Education 2002.

18 The Education Trust, 2003 Of Every 100 African American Kindergartners: (25-to 29-Year-Olds) Source: US Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. March Current Population Survey, , In The Condition of Education 2002.

19 The Education Trust, 2003 Of Every 100 Latino Kindergartners : (25-to 29-Year-Olds) Source: US Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. March Current Population Surveys, , In The condition of Education 2002.

20 The Education Trust, 2003 College Graduates by Age 26 Source: Tom Mortenson, Research Seminar on Public Policy Analysis of Opportunity for Post Secondary, 1997.

21 The Education Trust, 2003 Some education “leaders” are talking about the challenges in closing these gaps one way……

22 The Education Trust, 2003 “Requiring every group of students in every school to be proficient within 12 years, is like asking every kid to jump the Grand Canyon.” –educator, Connecticut June 10, 2002 Associated Press

23 The Education Trust, 2003 "President Bush often talks about every child reading by the end of third grade. It's like saying every child needs to talk at nine months. It's ridiculous." Yetta Goodman, a University of Arizona education professor, The Arizona Republic, 6/2/03

24 The Education Trust, 2003 "It is so inflexible. If any group of kids fails to meet the standard, the whole school is labeled as failing.” –suburban superintendent (used to doing extremely well under old system of averages)

25 The Education Trust, 2003 Even if schools are doing extremely well, they can be cited for poor performance if designated groups of students or minorities do not meet annual expectations two years in a row. Under this standard it is theoretically possible to have sanctions imposed on schools in our state where there are dozens of Illinois state scholars.” – Larry Vigon, Local School Council teacher representative (Chicago) in a letter to the Chicago Tribune, 8/26/03

26 The Education Trust, 2003 "I have difficulty with the standards because they're so unattainable for so many of our students... We just don't have the same kids they have on Long Island or Orchard Park.” –Superintendent, New York October 21, 2002, The Buffalo News

27 The Education Trust, 2003 "If a school has five subgroups (of students) and four do well, but one fails, the entire school is a failure. We don't think that's fair.” Reg Weaver, President of the NEA, Whittier Daily News, 5/24/03

28 The Education Trust, 2003 “They may as well have decreed that pigs can fly... I think the State Board of Education is dealing with reality, not myth. Some of these politicians just have their heads in the sand.” -Wayne Johnson, CTA President Los Angeles Times August 6, 2002

29 The Education Trust, 2003 “If we could do it, we already would have.” -- Peter Gutierrez, assistant superintendent of the Hollister School District, Hollister Free Lance (CA), 4/30/03

30 The Education Trust, 2003 Think about the messages in what they say…  To parents…about whose kids matter;  To students…about how much educators think they can learn; and,  To teachers…about whether they even have to try.

31 The Education Trust, 2003 Myths and Realities

32 The Education Trust, 2003 #1. Poverty has a bigger effect than anything that educators can ever do.

33 The Education Trust, 2003 Source: Education Trust analysis of data from National School-Level State Assessment Score Database (www.schooldata.org).www.schooldata.org

34 The Education Trust, 2003 Source: Education Trust analysis of data from National School-Level State Assessment Score Database (www.schooldata.org).www.schooldata.org

35 The Education Trust, 2003 Source: Education Trust analysis of data from National School-Level State Assessment Score Database (www.schooldata.org).www.schooldata.org

36 The Education Trust, 2003 Source: Education Trust analysis of data from National School-Level State Assessment Score Database (www.schooldata.org).www.schooldata.org

37 The Education Trust, 2003 Samuel W. Tucker Elementary Alexandria, VA Source: Virginia Department of Education  68% African American and Latino  53% low-income  Outperformed 2/3 of VA elem. schools in both reading and math for two years in a row (2001-2).  In 2002, out- performed 92% of VA elem. schools in reading and 86% in math.

38 The Education Trust, 2003 David D. Jones Elementary Greensboro, NC Source: The Education Trust, Dispelling the Myth Online  69% African American and Latino  58% low-income  On average, outscored 83% of GA elementary schools in  94% of African American 5 th graders met the state standard in math in

39 The Education Trust, 2003 West Manor Elementary Atlanta, GA Source: The Education Trust, Dispelling the Myth  99% African American.  80% low-income  Outscored 98% of GA elementary schools in 2 nd grade reading in  Outperformed 90% of GA elementary schools in 2 nd grade math in 2002.

40 The Education Trust, 2003 St. James Gaillard Elementary Eutawville, SC Source: The Education Trust, Dispelling the Myths Online  99% African American and Latino.  87% low-income  Outperformed 97% of SC elem. schools in 3 rd grade math in  Outperformed 82% of SC elem. schools in 4 th grade reading in 2002.

41 The Education Trust, 2003 The Young Women’s Leadership School of East Harlem, New York Source: TYWLS Web site and New York State Department of Education and NYC Public Schools, Annual School Report.  93% African American.  83% low-income  100% of seniors in the first two graduating classes were accepted to four-year colleges and universities.

42 The Education Trust, 2003 YES College Prep Houston, TX Source: YES College Prep Web site and Texas Education Agency  96% African American.  85% low- income  100% of seniors in the first two graduating classes were accepted to at least two colleges and universities.

43 The Education Trust, 2003 Of course, poverty is a barrier. And it doesn’t help to imply otherwise. But what’s clear from these schools, is that it is a barrier that can be overcome.

44 The Education Trust, 2003 #2. Perhaps we could narrow the gap, but given all those advantages, we’ll certainly never close it.

45 The Education Trust, 2003 Sycamore Elementary School Kokomo, IN Source: Indiana Department of Education  37% African American and Latino.  62% low-income  Increased African American 3 rd graders meeting state standard in math by 55 percentages points between 2000 and  Closed Black- White 3 rd grade reading gap.

46 The Education Trust, 2003 Lincoln Elementary School Mount Vernon, NY Source: Ed Trust. Dispelling the Myth Online and New York State Department of Education. Overview of School Performance In English Language Arts, Mathematics, and Science and Analysis of Student Subgroup Performance for Lincoln School. April 10, 2003  69% African American and Latino  49% low-income  Has outperformed nearly ¾ of NY elem. schools in both math and English for three years in a row.  In 2002, outscored 98% of NY elem. schools in math and 99% in English.

47 The Education Trust, 2003 South Scotland Elementary Laurinburg, NC Source: Data provided by South Scotland Elementary School  47% African American and Native American.  47% low-income  Over 80% of both African American and Native American 4 th graders met state standard in math in both 2001 and  Closed reading gap between African American and White students in 2003.

48 The Education Trust, 2003 #3. There may be schools, but no school districts that get high performance from poor children or children of color.

49 The Education Trust, 2003

50 Aldine, TX: Raising Achievement for All While Narrowing Gaps Source: Texas Education Agency-Academic Excellence Indicator System Report 1994 through 2001.

51 The Education Trust, 2003 Aldine, TX: Raising Achievement for All While Narrowing Gaps Source: Texas Education Agency-Academic Excellence Indicator System Report 1994 through 2001.

52 The Education Trust, 2003 Houston Independent School District Source: Texas Education Agency-Academic Excellence Indicator System Report 1994 through 2002

53 The Education Trust, 2003 #4. There are certainly no whole states that are getting it right.

54 The Education Trust, 2003 Black 4th Graders? Big Differences in State Performance NAEP MATH

55 The Education Trust, 2003 Hispanic 4th Graders? Big Differences in State Performance NAEP MATH

56 The Education Trust, 2003 Black 8 th Graders: Big Differences in State Performance NAEP Math

57 The Education Trust, th Grade Math African American Gains Between 1992 and 2000 Source: USDOE, NCES, National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) Summary Data Tables

58 The Education Trust, th Grade Math Latino Gains Between 1992 and 2000 Source: USDOE, NCES, National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) Summary Data Tables

59 The Education Trust, th Grade Math African American Gains Between 1990 and 2000 Source: USDOE, NCES, National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) Summary Data Tables

60 The Education Trust, th Grade Math Latino Gains Between 1990 and 2000 Source: USDOE, NCES, National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) Summary Data Tables

61 The Education Trust, 2003 SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Education Statistics, National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP)

62 The Education Trust, 2003 SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Education Statistics, National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP)

63 The Education Trust, th Grade Reading: Latinos in Virginia Perform as Well or Better Than Whites in 17 States Source: NCES, National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), 2002 Scale Score

64 The Education Trust, 2003 #5. We might be able to make some improvements in “these” children, but it will take a decade or two.

65 The Education Trust, 2003 Centennial Place Elementary Atlanta, GA Source: The Education Trust, Dispelling the Myth Online  92% African American and Latino  79% low-income  Outscored 93% of GA elementary schools in 4 th grade reading in  Outscored 88% of GA elementary schools in 4 th grade math in 2002.

66 The Education Trust, 2003 Longfellow Elementary School Mount Vernon, NY Source: The Education Trust, Dispelling the Myth Online  100% African American and Latino  92% low-income  Outperformed 90% of NY elem. schools in math for two years in a row (2001-2).  In 2002, 93% of 4 th grade students met state standard in English.

67 The Education Trust, 2003 Long Beach Unified School District Source: Research by the National Center for Educational Accountability

68 The Education Trust, 2003 Boston Public Schools

69 The Education Trust, 2003 Source: Research by the National Center on Educational Accountability Norfolk Public Schools

70 The Education Trust, 2003 Garden Grove Unified School District Source: Research by the National Center on Educational Accountability

71 The Education Trust, 2003 Delaware: Gains in Grade 4 Reading Outpace the Nation, Source: USDOE, NCES, National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) Summary Data Tables

72 The Education Trust, 2003 State Progress in Moving African American 8 th Graders From Below Basic to at Least Basic Math Source: USDOE, NCES, National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) Summary Data Tables

73 The Education Trust, 2003 State Progress in Moving Latino 8 th Graders From Below Basic to at Least Basic Math Source: USDOE, NCES, National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) Summary Data Tables

74 The Education Trust, 2003 But look at how the system worked…

75 The Education Trust, 2003 Abraham Lincoln Middle School Gainesville, Florida  31% White  59% African American  57% Low Income  An “A” school under the Florida accountability model Source: Florida Department of Education,

76 The Education Trust, 2003 Achievement Gaps at Lincoln Reading Source: Florida Department of Education, AYP Target= 31%

77 The Education Trust, 2003 Achievement Gaps at Lincoln Math Source: Florida Department of Education, AYP Target= 38%

78 The Education Trust, 2003 Alexis I du Pont High School Red Clay, Delaware  49% White  24% African American  21% Latino  31% Low Income  Named “ One of America’s Best High Schools” by Newsweek Magazine Source: Delaware Department of Education, Newsweek Magazine, June 2, 2003

79 The Education Trust, 2003 Achievement Gaps at du Pont English/Language Arts AYP Target= 57% Source: Delaware Department of Education,

80 The Education Trust, 2003 Achievement Gaps at du Pont Math AYP Target= 33% Source: Delaware Department of Education,

81 The Education Trust, 2003 All NCLB Says is That These Schools Need to Improve Wouldn’t you agree?

82 The Education Trust, 2003 Fortunately, other education leaders are talking about the same challenge in quite different ways…

83 The Education Trust, 2003 "It means to me that all kids can learn, all kids can be successful, and that I will never ever lower my standard of expectations, because I know now in my heart that it's real." Ft. Worth Walton Elementary’s top Reading Teacher Vanessa Kemp re: Walton’s dramatically improved student reading levels, Reporter Matt Frazier, Ft. Worth Star Telegram, 10/24/03

84 The Education Trust, 2003 “At the end of the day, school districts have to make sure that all their schools are strong academically. It won't be easy, but it's doable. As educators, this is what we signed up for; this is the work that we have to do." Saginaw School District Superintendent Gerald Dawkins (MI), The Saginaw News, 4/13/03.

85 The Education Trust, 2003 "There are people who'll say, 'Given that neighborhood a child is from, what do you expect.’ It's our job to say there are no excuses - that we have to address students' needs so they can achieve." Frank Tinney, director of standards, assessment and accountability in the Palm Springs Unified School District, The Desert Sun (Palm Springs, CA), 4/8/03

86 The Education Trust, 2003 "Until the gap is closed, our work is not done." Des Moines Superintendent Eric Witherspoon, Des Moines Register, 4/15/03

87 The Education Trust, 2003 "It's not that they are failing so much as we are failing…This shines a very bright light on something we have known for years but haven't been forced to deal with until now ---- that we have to close this massive gap if all of our students are going to succeed." Ken Noonan, Oceanside Unified School District Superintendent, North County Times (CA), 5/25/03

88 The Education Trust, 2003 "As you put in accountability, people pay more attention to what the expectations are... You're seeing a lot of things coming together and paying off for kids." Susan Agruso, assistant superintendent for instructional accountability for Charlotte- Mecklenburg, Raleigh News and Observer, 6/18/03

89 The Education Trust, 2003 “[McMillan] said the goals of NCLB may be lofty, but without, for example, President Kennedy’s lofty goal of putting a man on the moon, it would not have happened.” Houghton Lake Community Schools Superintendent Greg McMillan, Reporter Cheryl Holladay, Hougton Lake Resorter, 10/3/03

90 The Education Trust, 2003 “We have really blown that myth about high-poverty schools being low achievers out of the water. Economically deprived doesn't mean brain deprived.” Janie Moran, Principal Southern Hills, a high poverty school in Louisiana where all but one of their 48 4th grade student passed LEAP, Shreveport Times, 5/29/03

91 The Education Trust, 2003 “…this new era is not just a matter of kids having access to school… This new era is about how we're going to make sure all kids learn. Andy Tompkins, Kansas Department of Education Commissioner, Topeka Capital Journal, 7/8/03

92 The Education Trust, 2003 "Neither poverty nor race is an excuse. All children can rise to the standards and there are many schools in the data that you have to prove it.” –Rick Mills, Commissioner of Education, New York. March 28, 2002, New York Times

93 The Education Trust, 2003 “With proper instruction, students here can blow other kids away in the humanities. The more you challenge them, the better they'll do.” –Dolores Edwards Sullivan, an English teacher in the predominantly African American Roosevelt school district, whose 11th graders are starting to earn higher marks on state Regents exams.

94 The Education Trust, 2003 “Yes, parents may have the greatest impact on how their children come to us. But we have the greatest impact on how they leave us.” –Superintendent, North Carolina

95 The Education Trust, 2003 Yes, this is going to be hard. But how we communicate will play a large role in whether people will even try.

96 The Education Trust, 2003 The Education Trust For More Information... Washington, DC: Oakland, CA:


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