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Student Research Project Year 10 Science Bede Polding College.

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Presentation on theme: "Student Research Project Year 10 Science Bede Polding College."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Student Research Project Year 10 Science Bede Polding College

3 Welcome to the Student Research Project Presentation This presentation has been designed to: 1.Help you in organising your SRP this year 2.Provide information and copies of important sheets involved with the SRP.

4 What Do I Need to Do? For your SRP, you will need to: 1.Conduct a first-hand experiment independently 2.Complete a logbook, detailing your scientific process 3.Write an experimental report on your experiment The next page outlines the important due dates for your SRP, and procedures if you are absent on these days. Please note these down carefully.

5 A Reminder About Due Dates and Procedures Your SRP can be divided into FOUR stages. 1.Handing in your Proposal Form 2.Handing in your logbook for the FIRST LOGBOOK CHECK. 3.Handing in your logbook for the SECOND LOGBOOK CHECK. 4.Final submission of your report and logbook.

6 A Reminder About Due Dates and Procedures 1. HANDING IN YOUR PROPOSAL FORM When is it due? The Proposal Form is due on the 11 th February 2015 Where do I hand it in? The Proposal From is to be handed to your class teacher during the normal Science lesson. It is NOT to be put into the Assessment Box in the Student Foyer. What happens if I am absent on that day? If you are absent, your will need to show your teacher your Proposal Form on the next day, if possible, or the next Science lesson at the latest. What is the penalty for handing it in late? Three days late = Afternoon detention

7 A Reminder About Due Dates and Procedures 2. HANDING IN YOUR LOGBOOK FOR THE FIRST LOGBOOK CHECK When is it due? The first logbook check is on the 20th February 2015 Where do I hand it in? You should show your logbook to your class teacher during the normal Science lesson. Your logbook is NOT to be put into the Assessment Box in the Student Foyer. What happens if I am absent on that day? If you are absent, your will need to show your teacher your logbook on the next day, if possible, or the next Science lesson at the latest. What is the penalty for handing it in late? Three days late = Afternoon detention

8 A Reminder About Due Dates and Procedures 3. HANDING IN YOUR LOGBOOK FOR THE SECOND LOGBOOK CHECK When is it due? The second logbook check is on the 6 th March 2015 Where do I hand it in? You should show your logbook to your class teacher during the normal Science lesson. Your logbook is NOT to be put into the Assessment Box in the Student Foyer. What happens if I am absent on that day? If you are absent, your will need to show your teacher your logbook on the next day, if possible, or the next Science lesson at the latest. What is the penalty for handing it in late? Three days late = Afternoon detention

9 A Reminder About Due Dates and Procedures 4. FINAL SUBMISSION OF YOUR REPORT AND LOGBOOK. When is it due? The final submission of the report and logbook is on 16th March 2015 Where do I hand it in? Your class teacher will collect the report and logbook during the normal Science lesson. They are NOT to be put into the Assessment Box in the Student Foyer. What happens if I am absent on that day? If you are absent, you will need to submit your report and logbook on your first day returning to school. You will then need to complete an ‘Illness and Misadventure’ form (available from the student foyer) and submit it, along with a Doctor’s Certificate explaining your absence, to Mr Lans or Mrs Gavin.

10 A Reminder About Due Dates and Procedures 4. FINAL SUBMISSION OF YOUR REPORT AND LOGBOOK. What is the penalty for handing it in late? Late submission of EITHER the SRP Report or the Log book Will results in an afternoon detention being issued immediately. Three days late = ‘N Award’ Warning Letter. PLEASE NOTE If your SRP Report is not typed, it will not be accepted. If your SRP Report is glued into your Log book it will not be accepted. If your SRP Report or Log book does not show a serious attempt at the work, it will not be accepted.

11 There Are Prizes!! The Flannery Prize This prize is given to the student or students with the most outstanding Student Research Projects. The prize is a $100 voucher.

12 Let the Journey Begin! The following slides outline your SRP journey in its four stages. Please follow each step carefully, and use the hyperlinks on the right if you need any extra information.

13 What are independent and dependent variables? 1. Receive your SRP from your teacher STAGE 1 – COMPLETING YOUR PROPOSAL 2. Decide on a problem 3. Fill in a Proposal Form 4. Get parents to sign it 5. Show teacher Proposal Form by 11 th February Make improvements suggested by teacher 7. Has your teacher approved your Proposal Form? Need an extra copy of the SRP? Need some help deciding on a problem? Need an extra copy of a Proposal Form? YES NO GO TO STAGE 2

14 What should be included in my Aim, Hypothesis & Method? 8. Set up your log book STAGE 2 – GETTING ORGANISED 9. Paste Proposal Form in the front of the log book 10. Write an Aim, Hypothesis & Method in the log book 11. Begin a trial run of your experiment. Write rough results in your log book 12. Evaluate the trial run of your experiment 13. Decide on improvements your could make to your experiment 14. Show teacher your log book by 20 th February 2015 What should my log book look like? GO TO STAGE 3 How do I try and improve my experiment? How to get great marks for your logbook

15 15. Conduct the experiment with your improvements included. STAGE 3 – WRITING YOUR REPORT 18. Draw a graph (or graphical representation) of your results 19. Write a rough copy of a discussion in your log book 20. Show teacher your log book by 6 th March 2015 GO TO STAGE Record the results of all your trials in a table 16. Repeat your experiment to make sure your results are correct Why do I need to repeat my experiment? How do I draw a good graph? What should be included in my discussion? How do I draw a good table?

16 What is the Marking Criteria for the SRP? Can I see an Annotated Report already done? Now…CELEBRATE!! 21. Type a NEAT COPY of your Aim and Method. STAGE 4 – FINISHING YOUR REPORT 24. Type a conclusion for your report 23. Type a NEAT COPY of your discussion 22. Present your results in a table and graph if possible What should be included in my conclusion? 25. HAND IN your log book and report to your teacher by 16 th March 2015 QUIT POWERPOINT

17 If you would like to access this PowerPoint from the School Website, you can go to the following link: teaching/science/science.aspx Here you will find copies of the SRP, Proposal Form and PowerPoint, should you need to download another copy. Need an Extra Copy of the SRP? If you are accessing this PowerPoint on the School Network, download a copy of the SRP by clicking on the link below: SRP Booklet 201 RETURN TO MAIN MENU

18 Having trouble deciding? Try doing this: 1.Think about the things in which you are interested. 2.Select one interest and brainstorm some experiments related to this interest. Consider what expert help or specialised equipment you have access to. 3.Select one experiment and: – design a procedure for the experiment – identify any equipment you will need – predict how long it will take – identify the independent, dependent and controlled variables in the experiment. 4. If the experiment seems suitable, write up a Proposal Form. Otherwise, think of another experiment. RETURN TO MAIN MENU Need Some Help Deciding on a Problem? NEED SOME IDEAS FOR EXPERIMENTS?

19 Suggested Experiment Ideas – Page 1 Can exercise improve a person's memory? Which type of fabric best blocks the sun’s rays? How does surface area affect how things react? Is there a relationship between absorption and thickness of paper towel? Make a boat to go across the pool. Investigate ways to make it go faster/further? Which paper is the strongest? How much water can different soils hold? Investigate methods of noise control. Investigate the effect of air resistance on velocity. Investigate the effects of storage temperatures on batteries. Compare the strengths of building materials. Compare methods of preventing corrosion. Investigate the factors affecting the growth of crystals. Investigate the biodegradability of plastics. Investigate the effect of salt on seed germination. Compare the effectiveness of blankets, doonas and sleeping bags. NEED SOME MORE IDEAS FOR EXPERIMENTS? RETURN TO MAIN MENU

20 Suggested Experiment Ideas – Page 2 Compare the volume of carbon dioxide produced by Alka-Seltzer tablets. Investigate the absorption of water by crystals. Investigate the spacing between a line of dominoes and the time taken for them to topple. Compare plant growth in various potting mixes. Investigate the effectiveness of stain-removal products. Compare strength of different coloured hair. Investigate the effect of microwaves on seeds. Does the shape of the outlet hole affect the rate at which water flows out of a bottle? Does sugar make plants grow faster? Does cold water or hot water freeze faster? How well do seedlings grow using different colours instead of white light? How good are the different sunscreens at protecting cloth from fading in sunlight? How good are simple vegetable dyes (e.g. beetroot) at resisting fading in sunlight? RETURN TO MAIN MENU NEED SOME MORE IDEAS FOR EXPERIMENTS?

21 Suggested Experiment Ideas – Page 3 What conditions will enable a pinhole camera to make a good quality photograph? Which household substances can be best combined to make an electrical battery? What shape of parachute is best at slowing an object falling to the ground? How much weight will various fibres support before they break? Which material makes the best insulator? Which battery lasts the longest? How much weight can a plastic garbage bag/or shopping bag hold? Which sticky tape is strongest? Which type of cup keeps water warm for the longest? Investigate different fabrics and static charge Investigate factors affecting the setting of jelly. How can cut flowers be made to last longer in a vase? Will a hot tennis ball bounce higher than a cold tennis ball? Who has the fastest reactions, males or females? RETURN TO MAIN MENU NEED SOME MORE IDEAS FOR EXPERIMENTS?

22 Which shape of paper aeroplane flies the furthest? Which brand of cling wrap is the strongest? Which is the best way to keep take-away food hot? Which types of seedlings show the quickest geotropic or phototropic effects? Do some potting mixes hold more water than others? Which foods compost most quickly? How can you speed the composting process? What shape rolls down an incline most quickly? Which colours absorb the most heat? How different are the weather conditions in a garden compared to those on an oval? NEED SOME MORE IDEAS FOR EXPERIMENTS? RETURN TO MAIN MENU Suggested Experiment Ideas – Page 4

23 Suggested Experiment Ideas – Page 5 Does the speed of reflexes change with age? Is there any variation in reflexes between boys and girls, or between sporting people and sedentary people? Do students who play computer games have quicker reflexes? How much water is in different fruits? What is the most effective home insulation? How much of your garbage is packaging? Is a fibre twice as thick going to be twice as strong? Do more expensive batteries last longer or perform better? How do different dissolved substances change the boiling point of water? Investigate the effects of detergents, pH, and/or varying concentrations of salts on selected plants. Compare the fat content of various sausages. Investigate whether the use of aluminium foil makes a difference in cooking times. Compare the efficiency of washing detergents containing enzymes with those without enzymes. RETURN TO MAIN MENU

24 If you would like to access this PowerPoint from the School Website, you can go to the following link: teaching/science/science.aspx Here you will find copies of the SRP, Proposal Form and PowerPoint, should you need to download another copy. Need an Extra Copy of the Proposal Form? If you are accessing this PowerPoint on the School Network, download a copy of the Proposal Form by clicking on the link below: SRP Proposal Form student files on G drive RETURN TO MAIN MENU

25 The INDEPENDENT VARIABLE is the variable that you are CHANGING. When drawing a graph, the independent variable is always on the x-axis. RETURN TO MAIN MENU What are Independent and Dependent Variables? The DEPENDENT VARIABLE is the variable that you are MEASURING. When drawing a graph, the independent variable is always on the y-axis. Example: A student conducts an experiment to measure the effect of different soil types on the growth of plants. The student is CHANGING the soil type, so soil type is the independent variable The student is MEASURING plant height, so plant height is the dependent variable.

26 To help assess your planning and work throughout the project you will need to keep a Project log book. This is the small exercise book that was listed in the stationery requirements list. Your log book is like a diary in which you record a brief summary of what you do each time you do some work on your assignment. It should include everything that you do which is related to your research project. This includes planning, equipment lists and advice that you have obtained. Record your failures as well as your successes. Your log book is your original work. It is meant to be a rough copy. What Should my Log Book look like? LIKE TO SEE A PHOTO OF A GOOD LOG BOOK? RETURN TO MAIN MENU

27 What Should my Log Book look like? LIKE TO SEE MORE PHOTOS OF A GOOD LOG BOOK? RETURN TO MAIN MENU

28 What Should my Log Book look like? LIKE TO SEE MORE PHOTOS OF A GOOD LOG BOOK? RETURN TO MAIN MENU

29 What Should my Log Book look like? LIKE TO SEE MORE PHOTOS OF A GOOD LOG BOOK? RETURN TO MAIN MENU

30 What Should my Log Book look like? LIKE TO SEE MORE PHOTOS OF A GOOD LOG BOOK? RETURN TO MAIN MENU

31 What Should my Log Book look like? RETURN TO MAIN MENU

32 How to get Great Marks for your Logbook RETURN TO MAIN MENU Use this checklist to help attain maximum marks for your log book.  Have you glued your Science Student Research Project Proposal Form in the front of your log book?  Have you had your Science Student Research Project Proposal Form signed by: – Yourself? – Your parents? – Your teacher?  Is your log book well organised?  Have you dated all entries?  Have you shown detailed planning for your experiment?  Have you included details of trial runs and/or modifications made during your experiment?  Have you included rough copies of your results in an appropriate format?  Have you recorded measurements for an appropriate number of trials?  Have you written comments in your log book evaluating the success of your experiment and considering improvements to your experimental design?  Is your log book signed and dated at least twice by your teacher?

33 WANT TO KNOW ABOUT THE HYPOTHESIS? WANT TO KNOW ABOUT THE METHOD? RETURN TO MAIN MENU What Should be Included in my Aim, Hypothesis & Method? Examples: a) To investigate the effect of colour on the absorption of heat. b) To observe whether temperature effects the height of strawberry plants. The aim describes the problem being investigated in the experiment. The aim should be written as one sentence, and should include a verb near the beginning of the sentence. Good aims also include the independent variable and the dependent variable. Aim:

34 RETURN TO MAIN MENU The hypothesis is your educated guess on the answer to this problem. It is based on informed opinion (your experience, research, expert advice, logic), it is not just a wild guess. It should be written as a simple statement. Examples: a) The darker the colour the more it will absorb heat. b) As the temperature increases, the plant height will decrease. What Should be Included in my Aim, Hypothesis & Method? Hypothesis: WANT TO KNOW ABOUT THE METHOD? WANT TO KNOW ABOUT THE AIM?

35 RETURN TO MAIN MENU What Should be Included in my Aim, Hypothesis & Method? 1.The method is written as a procedure with the steps in the order they occur. Each step is clear and starts with a verb such as measure, connect, place, heat etc. 2.It should be clear in the method what is being changed (independent variable), what is being measured (dependent variable) and how all other variables are being kept constant (controlled variables) 3.The method explains what the control will be (if there is one), how many times the experiment will be repeated and how accurate measurements will be made. 4.A method usually includes a scientific diagram to assist in the explanation of how the equipment is set up. If it is not obvious in the diagram any equipment required should be listed Method: WANT TO KNOW ABOUT THE AIM? WANT TO KNOW ABOUT THE HYPOTHESIS?

36 WANT TO KNOW ABOUT RELIABILITY? WANT TO KNOW ABOUT VALIDITY? To improve the accuracy of your experiment, you could: 1.Use computerised equipment that can measure temperature or length more accurately. 2.Using equipment with smaller units on it. e.g. measuring a length in mm is better than measuring the length in cm. RETURN TO MAIN MENU How Can I Improve My Experiment? There are many ways that you may improve your experiment. You should consider the accuracy, reliability and validity of your experiment The ACCURACY of your experiment refers to how well your results agree with known data or other published results. To comment on accuracy, you should see what others have done on the Internet and see if your results agree with their results. If they do, you can say that your experiment is ACCURATE.

37 WANT TO KNOW ABOUT ACCURACY? WANT TO KNOW ABOUT VALIDITY? To improve the reliability of your experiment, you could: 1.Perform further repeats of your experiment and compare the results to ensure they are consistent. RETURN TO MAIN MENU How Can I Improve My Experiment? There are many ways that you may improve your experiment. You should consider the accuracy, reliability and validity of your experiment The RELIABILITY of your experiment refers to how consistent your results are when your experiment is repeated. To comment on reliability, you should consider whether your have repeated your experiment. If you have repeated your experiment and your results are consistent when you compare them, you can say that your experiment is RELIABLE.

38 WANT TO KNOW ABOUT RELIABILITY? WANT TO KNOW ABOUT ACCURACY? To improve the validity of your experiment, you could: 1.Change something about your experiment to help you control variables even more. This could be using a different piece of equipment that would allow you to be sure that a certain part of your experiment is exactly the same for each trial. RETURN TO MAIN MENU How Can I Improve My Experiment? There are many ways that you may improve your experiment. You should consider the accuracy, reliability and validity of your experiment The VALIDITY of your experiment refers to how well your experiment measures what it is supposed to measure. To comment on validity, you should consider whether you have controlled ALL variables except for the independent variable. If you have controlled all of the variables possible, you can say that your experiment is valid.

39 RETURN TO MAIN MENU How do you know whether the results you are collecting are correct? Why Do I Need to Repeat my Experiment? When you design an experiment, you should always repeat the experiment at least once, to ensure that the results are consistent. This tells you that the method is well- designed and is a big part of good experimental design. When the results of an experiment are the same each time you repeat it, we say that the experiment is RELIABLE. WANT TO KNOW MORE ABOUT RELIABILITY?

40 Below if a checklist for drawing a good table:  Title – Make it descriptive.  Table – Draw the table using a ruler. – The table should be enclosed.  Columns – Have a heading for each column. – Your independent variable should be the left-most column. – Your dependent variable should be in the column(s) to the right. – Include the units as part of the heading, not with every measurement. – Ensure your numbers are easy to read. – Include all repeats of your experiment in your table. How Do I Draw a Good Table? RETURN TO MAIN MENU

41 Below if a checklist for drawing a good line graph:  Title  Axes – Draw axis lines with a ruler – Write label for each axis – Show units of measurement – Number each axis in equally sized intervals – Choose intervals that are easy to work with – Put the independent variable on the x axis – Put the dependent variable on the y axis  Points – Plot each point accurately – Use an small X to mark each point – Show the trend of the points with a line of best fit  Draw graph in pencil  Make it as large as possible for greater accuracy How Do I Draw a Good Graph? RETURN TO MAIN MENU

42 The discussion should: 1.Describe patterns or trends in the results. 2.Explain WHY we got this pattern or trend. 3. Discuss, how confident can we be in these findings? – Are the results VALID (does it test what was intended)? – Is the experiment RELIABLE (will it produce the same results if repeated)? Were there any problems with the experiment? How can it be improved? – Were the measurements ACCURATE? Would the equipment used be able to pick up very small differences in characteristic being measured? 4. Discuss, how are these findings useful? 5.Identify and discuss, what were the problems with your experiment? 6.Identify how could you improve your experiment? What Should Be Included in my Discussion? RETURN TO MAIN MENU

43 To the right is an annotated SRP report. You can also download a PDF of this report by clicking on the following link: SEE THE NEXT PAGE OF THE REPORT Can I see an Annotated Report already done? RETURN TO MAIN MENU

44 SEE THE NEXT PAGE OF THE REPORT Can I see an Annotated Report already done? RETURN TO MAIN MENU To the right is an annotated SRP report. You can also download a PDF of this report by clicking on the following link:

45 SEE THE NEXT PAGE OF THE REPORT Can I see an Annotated Report already done? RETURN TO MAIN MENU To the right is an annotated SRP report. You can also download a PDF of this report by clicking on the following link:

46 Can I see an Annotated Report already done? RETURN TO MAIN MENU To the right is an annotated SRP report. You can also download a PDF of this report by clicking on the following link:

47 1.Your conclusion should give a very brief summary of your experimental findings, and be linked to your aim. 1.Your conclusion should say whether your hypothesis was supported or not. 1.Your conclusion should be written as no more than 3 sentences. What Should Be Included in my Conclusion? RETURN TO MAIN MENU

48 SRP Marking Criteria (Page 1 of 3) RETURN TO MAIN MENU SEE NEXT PAGE

49 SRP Marking Criteria (Page 2 of 3) RETURN TO MAIN MENU SEE NEXT PAGE SEE PREVIOUS PAGE

50 SRP Marking Criteria (Page 3 of 3) RETURN TO MAIN MENU SEE PREVIOUS PAGE


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