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1 Title I, Part D Data Reporting and Evaluation: What You Need To Know Dory Seidel and Jenna Tweedie, NDTAC Karen Neilson, California Department of Education.

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Presentation on theme: "1 Title I, Part D Data Reporting and Evaluation: What You Need To Know Dory Seidel and Jenna Tweedie, NDTAC Karen Neilson, California Department of Education."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 Title I, Part D Data Reporting and Evaluation: What You Need To Know Dory Seidel and Jenna Tweedie, NDTAC Karen Neilson, California Department of Education

2 2 Overview Context Around Title I, Part D Data –Why States Must Collect and Submit Data: Statutory Requirements –Why the Data Are Important: Federal Use of Data –Why the Data Are Important: State Use of Data Data Collection –What To Collect: Federal and State Requirements –How the Collected Data Can be Reviewed: Data Quality Data Reporting –How To Report: CSPR, EDFacts –When To Report: Federal Reporting Timeline Resources

3 3 Context Around Title I, Part D Data Statutory Requirements Federal Use of Data State Use of Data

4 4 Why States Must Collect and Submit Data: Statutory Requirements Each State agency and local educational agency shall— (1) submit evaluation results to the State educational agency and the Secretary; and (2) use the results of evaluations under this section to plan and improve subsequent programs for participating children and youth. State and local agencies receiving Title I, Part D funds must evaluate their programs’ impact on the ability of students: (1) to maintain and improve educational achievement; (2) to accrue school credits that meet State requirements for grade promotion and secondary school graduation; (3) to make the transition to a regular program or other education program operated by a local educational agency; (4) to complete secondary school (or secondary school equivalency requirements) and obtain employment after leaving the correctional facility or institution for neglected or delinquent children and youth; and (5) as appropriate, to participate in postsecondary education and job training programs. Source: Title I, Part D Statute, Subpart 3

5 5 Why States Must Collect and Submit Data: Statutory Requirements (cont.) Major Federal data collections for Title I, Part D (Part D): Annual Child Count –Used by U.S. Department of Education (ED) to determine Title I, Part A and Title I, Part D funding allocations Consolidated State Performance Report (CSPR)/EDFacts –Used by ED to demonstrate the effectiveness of Part D programs

6 6 Why the Title I, Part D Data Are Important: Federal Uses of Data Program evaluation and performance assessments –Government Performance Results Act Modernization Act of 2010 (GPRAMA) –Federal Budget Requests to Congress –In response to Congressional Requests (e.g., Elementary and Secondary Education Act reauthorization) Public dissemination/use –ED Data Express Data Express –NDTAC’s Fast Facts and Annual Performance Overviews

7 7 Why the Title I, Part D Data Are Important: State Use of Data To plan effective planning and improvement, including the following activities: –Program evaluation –Decision-making –Goal setting –Needs assessments –Monitoring

8 8 Why the Title I, Part D Data Are Important: State Use of Data−Example 1

9 9 Why the Title I, Part D Data Are Important: State Use of Data−Example 2

10 10 Data Collection Federal Requirements Data Quality

11 11 What To Collect: Federal Requirements All Title I, Part D-funded programs must collect data to report to ED. Program categories: Neglected Programs Juvenile Detention Juvenile Corrections At-Risk Programs—Subpart 2 only Adult Corrections—Subpart 1 only Other Programs Resources: CSPR Forms, CSPR Guide

12 12 What To Collect: Federal Requirements (cont.) Each State agency and LEA program submits data in the following areas to ED: Student and facility counts Student demographics Transition services Academic and vocational outcomes Academic performance in reading and mathematics Individual States may have additional requirements.

13 13 How the Collected Data Can Be Reviewed: Data Quality Data quality is best achieved when timely reviews are done at each reporting level (e.g., program, subgrantee, State). Educating subgrantees/programs on data collection can improve data quality.

14 14 Data Reporting Processes CSPR/EDFacts Federal Reporting Timeline

15 15 How To Report: Consolidated State Performance Report CSPR is a data collection instrument administered annually by ED’s Office of Elementary and Secondary Education (OESE). The required measures for Title I, Part D can be found in CSPR section 2.4.

16 16 How To Report: EDFacts EDFacts is an ED initiative to collect, analyze, report on, and promote the use of high-quality performance data. Most of the Title I, Part D data are now reported through EDFacts. Eventually, all CSPR data will be reported through the EDFacts’ online Education Data Exchange Network (EDEN) Submission System (ESS).

17 17 How To Report: CSPR and EDFacts Category/AreaCSPR TablesEDFacts Specification Files Facility Counts/Programming S1= & S2= & Not included Student Count/Demographics S1= S2= S1=C119 S2=C127 Transition Services S1= S2= S1 & S2=C182 Academic/Vocational Outcomes S1= S2= S1 & S2=In Program=C180 S1 & S2=Exited Program=C181 Pre- and Posttesting in Reading and Math S1= & S2= & S1=C113 S2=C125

18 18 When To Report: Federal Reporting Timeline * Expected date is October, but files may be made available later

19 19 Resources ED’s CSPR tables: 4.docED’s CSPR tables: ED’s EDFacts file specifications: EDFacts file specifications: NDTAC’s data collection list: delinquent.org/sites/default/files/NDTAC_CSPR_Collection_List_ _0.docNDTAC’s data collection list: NDTAC’s forthcoming “CSPR Guide” State CSPR and EDFacts coordinators


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