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WHEN IT COMES TO WATERING; LESS IS MORE Allison Marr.

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Presentation on theme: "WHEN IT COMES TO WATERING; LESS IS MORE Allison Marr."— Presentation transcript:

1 WHEN IT COMES TO WATERING; LESS IS MORE Allison Marr

2 Challenges for the Gulf Island Gardener Ever burgeoning deer and rabbit population, raccoons Considerably higher cost of landscaping materials from plants to soil, mulch and gravel Selection of materials less than off- island WATER! - low supply, expensive, sometimes toxic

3 California North? Local summers are trending hotter and dryer Global Warming? What will the effects be on local precipitation rates and water supplies? Coastal BC's annual precipitation rates are still the highest in Canada

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6 Plants What do we want/need to grow, where and why?

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10 Assess the Site Assess water supply and availability Assess availability of time/ budget for maintenance Create a plan Proper site selection for landscape elements Plant selection Proper bed preparation/ drainage/soils

11 Execution of a New Landscape Excavating, landscape layout, create bare planting areas and rough-in features, drainage Irrigation installation, electrical rough in – lighting, power supply for ponds & etc. Hardscaping (patios, pathways, decks, fencing) Install softscaping (soils, plants, sod, mulch) Maintain with appropriate cultural methods

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14 Fundamentals of Water Conservation in the Landscape Work within the water budget of the property/community Use water efficiently to ensure more water is available for the community Collect water from run-off sources (gutters, roofs, natural ponds, grey water) Water restriction – in place in many communities to safeguard supply

15 METHODS FOR REDUCING THE WATER DEMANDS OF YOUR GARDEN AND LANDSCAPE

16 #1. Appropriate plant selection for your site and its environmental conditions Poor plant selection leads to plants being over or under watered Disease and pests are more prevalent when a plant is unsuited to its site Plants under perform in the production of fruit, flowers and new growth Worst case scenario, the plant dies

17 Choose your plants for the conditions ConditionIdeal Plant ChoicePoor Plant Choice Shade Hosta, Fatsia japonica, Begonia Lily, Most vegetables, Raspberry Exposed - Windy Ceanothus, Pine, HemlockRhododendrons, Delphiniums WetWillows, LigulariaMagnolia, Yucca, Cistus, Dry Phormium, Lavender, Lavatera Juncus (Rush), Scotch Moss Full SunRoses, Dahlias, PrunusHosta, Maidenhair Fern

18 Drought Tolerant Plants The best application for conserving water is selecting drought tolerant plant material There is a significant number of drought resistant plants available in our area There is often a correlation between drought tolerant and deer and rabbit resistant species

19 Drought Tolerant Plants in the Landscape Whenever possible drought tolerant plants should not be mixed with water needy plants in general, but particularly when water conservation is the primary objective Placement of dry plants with wet plants defeats the purpose of using drought tolerant species where irrigation is covering both plant types equally

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21 Plant Types Scientific NameCommon NamePlant Type Agastache Tender perennial/annual Narcissus*DaffodilBulb Eschscholizia california California PoppyPerennial/Annual Artemsia*Dusty MillersPerennial/Sub-shrub Senecio* Perennial/Sub-shrub Rosemarinus* Perennial/Sub-shrub Lavandula*LavenderPerennial/Sub-shrub Santolina* Perennial/Sub-shrub Perovskia astriplicafolia* Russian SagePerennial/Sub-shrub Centranthis ruber*Red ValerianPerennial Iris germanica*-Bearded IrisPerennial (Rhizome) Euphorbia* Perennial Yucca*- Grass Cortaderia*Pampas GrassGrass Pennisetum*Fountain GrassGrass Stipa* Grass Ceanothus*-California LilacEvergreen Shrub Scientific NameCommon NamePlant Type Fremontodendron*Flannel BushShrub Osmanthus* Shrub Tamarix* Shrub Berberis*BarberryShrub RubusBlackberryShrub/Creeper Juniper* Shrub/Tree Pinus*PineShrub/Tree Cedrus*True CedarTree Magnolia grandiflora* Evergreen Magnolia Tree Eucaplyptus* Tree Arbutus menzeziiMadrone/ArbutusTree & Shrub Form Quercus*OakTree RobiniaLocustTree Wisteria Vine Actostaphylos uva- ursi*- KinnickinnickGround Cover Thymus*ThymeHerb/Ground Cover Gaultheria shallon*SalalShrub/Ground Cover

22 Planting Schedule for Optimum Success and Water Efficiency Ideal planting /transplanting time is late fall from Mid- October to Mid-November Benefits: no heat or drought stress on new plants (especially large trees) deciduous plants are bare twig and require little water precipitation provides water supply until May roots develop over winter while the plants top growth is dormant plants will need less water throughout their first growing season

23 #2 Good Quality Soil and Mulches Soil type and quality is an important component of a water wise garden a soil that can be described at loam is ideal loam is a comprised of slit, sand and clay clay soils should have organic matter and sand amendments sandy soil should have organic matter added soils need to breathe and drain (sand) but also retain water (clay) and provide nutrients to the plant (silt)

24 Soil Depth Soil depth depends on what is being grown and where Raised bed depth is typically 12-24” Garden beds might range from 6-24” of topsoil Lawn/sod areas 4-6”

25 Mulches Good quality garden mulch provides excellent water retention and nutrients supply Organic mulches keep soil temperatures down and slow down water loss through surface evaporation Mulches comprised of garden kitchen, steer, fish, mushroom and leaf compost, seaweed and similar materials are excellent These materials mixed with fine dark bark mulch make very good mulches Bark mulch on its own is a poor mulch (robs nitrogen from soil, too acidic for many plants)

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27 #3 Cultural Practices Good cultural practices begin with good site planning and plant selection, good soils and mulches A simple cultural method that will increase water retention and distribution is cultivating soils/mulches a few times a year Cultivating is simply aerating the top layer(s) of soil/mulch to prevent compaction Compacted soil and mulch are less permeable to precipitation as water, especially on slopes will run off the surface and be wasted Cultivation in also beneficial for plant root development and for the absorption of nutrients and minerals

28 #4 Irrigation Methods Creating a new landscape or renovating an existing garden should always include a plan for irrigation Why invest in plant material without a plan to irrigate your investment Criteria for choosing the best irrigation type are: water supply types of plant size of the landscape project topography/existing hardscaping budget

29 Irrigation Professionals Choose a certified and experienced irrigation installer/contractor To ensure your water supply is used prudently and cost effectively To ensure quality products and efficient (not leaking) installation methods are used For continued service and maintenance

30 Lawn Rotors

31 Incorrect Use of a Lawn Rotor

32 Shrub Sprays

33 MP Rotators – Very efficient nozzles

34 Micro Sprays

35 Drip

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38 WHEN IT COMES TO WATERING; LESS IS MORE Allison Marr


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