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Changing the Future of Texas Children: The School Readiness Certification System Thomas L. Waxley, M.Ed. Children’s Learning Institute The University of.

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Presentation on theme: "Changing the Future of Texas Children: The School Readiness Certification System Thomas L. Waxley, M.Ed. Children’s Learning Institute The University of."— Presentation transcript:

1 Changing the Future of Texas Children: The School Readiness Certification System Thomas L. Waxley, M.Ed. Children’s Learning Institute The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth)

2 Project Partners

3 Quality What is quality and how is it determined?

4 The State of Preschool 2009 http://nieer.org/yearbook

5 QRIS Definition & Statewide Systems A quality rating and improvement system (QRIS) is a systemic approach to assess, improve, and communicate the level of quality in early and school-age care and education programs. QRIS is composed of five common elements: – Standards – Accountability measures – Program and practitioner outreach and support – Financing incentives – Parent/Consumer education efforts Currently 23 states have a statewide QRIS Source: http://nccic.acf.hhs.gov/pubs/qrs-defsystems.html

6 Texas School Readiness Certification System (SRCS)

7 SRCS What is the SRCS? The Texas system for certifying school readiness A component of Senate Bill 23 Created by the Texas State Center for Early Childhood Development (SCECD) (University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth), Children’s Learning Institute (CLI)) SB 23 Legislative Session: 79(R) Council Document: 79R 1050 CLG-D; SB 76 Legislative Session: 78(R) Council Document: 78R 542 CLG-D

8 Early Project History Timeline

9 What is school readiness? For the purposes of the School Readiness Certification System: “Children being ready to succeed by being able to function competently in a school environment in the areas of early literacy, early math, and social skills as objectively measured by State Center approved assessments.” SRCS Task Force Texas State Legislature

10 Measuring School Readiness Measuring “school readiness” is a valid determination of “quality” for several reasons: 1. Allows the creation of a unified and objective rating system across funding streams 2. Allows the objective determination of quality that is not program or method specific

11 Measuring School Readiness 3.Makes the connection between preschool and K-12 more explicit, therefore supporting increase in funding to Pre-K 4. Uses existing, research based, age appropriate Kindergarten indicators rather than creating high stakes Pre-K assessment

12 Measuring School Readiness The development of a SRCS allows an early childhood program: to be objective to focus on outcomes to link to existing indicators and to better align with later school performance expectations

13 SRCS and NAEYC SRCS is not a replacement for NAEYC standards or licensing regulations. SRCS is a seal of approval equally available to all types of early childhood program providers.

14 Student Outcome Measures Cognitive and social functioning Standardized screeners chosen by an expert panel Well-known and researched outcomes of ‘still developing’ and ‘developed’

15 Accountability Texas State Legislature Texas Education Agency P-16 Council Stakeholders

16 Security All FERPA guidelines – student confidentiality – identity security – educational need – certified in writing to TEA OZ Internal Security – controlled access to servers physical electronic

17 Certification Process Texas School Ready! Certification: A Two-Year Process PK facility applies to enter SRCS PK facility completes data entry in the first school year Students advance to kindergarten the next school year Kindergarten data collected statewide OZ completes data match SCECD completes analysis SRCS awarded or Improvement Plan suggested to the PK facility

18 OZ Systems and SRCS: A Historical Perspective in Numbers School Year Total StudentsTotal Classrooms Total Schools/ Facilities PreK 2005-200613,3191,325668 2006-2007 29,7452,2461,261 2007-200852,4233,6111,588 2008-200954,0613,7491,768 2009-2010*102,7485,7602,095 * These data are preliminary

19 Determining Certification

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22 Good preschool programming and good K outcomes (High) – Certified Poor preschool programming and poor K outcomes (Low) – Not Certified Poor preschool programming and good K outcomes (Mixed) – Not Certified Why does the mixed performing group (low quality, good K outcomes) not get certified? – Even though the mixed performing group had good K outcomes, this is in spite of their preschool programming, not because of it – Therefore, only the high performing group is certified

23 Texas Plan for 2009-2010 Quality – Required participation in SRCS – Implement proven school readiness components School Readiness Integration – Required community partnerships (Head Start, faith- based, non-profit, private for-profits) Eligibility – Based on student performance criteria – ½ of Texas 1229 districts ~6500 classrooms Over 100,000 students

24 Quality School Readiness Components High quality, developmentally appropriate, and rigorous curriculum. Continuous monitoring of student progress in the classroom. Professional development, including mentoring. Required by NCLB, certified teacher. Demonstrated through the SRCS

25 OZ Systems Components eSchoolPlus™ A web-based data management system used to: Collect child and program data Track individual children and target populations Ensure timely initiation of services Demonstrate program quality

26 Pre-K SRC Components Manage My School- One time setup Manage Student Records- Record attendance of students Facility Report- One time school report Teacher Self-Report- One time

27 Kindergarten Components Student List Reading Assessments TPRI Tejas Lee DIBELS English DIBELS Spanish iStation Social Screener Import

28 Prekindergarten Reports Generated Attendance Report Facility Report Integrated Report Manage My School Manage Student Records PK Schools Without Classrooms Teacher Self Report

29 Kindergarten Reports Generated K Assessments & Social Screener Completion Counts Report K Assessments & Social Screener Completion Summary K Assessments Noncompliance Less Than 15 K Assessments Noncompliance Reading Social Screener Noncompliance

30 Additional Functionality Additional functionality of eSchoolPlus™ Messaging Imports Exports Letters Searches

31 Let’s take a look!

32 Prekindergarten Application http://www.espdemos.com/scecd/WizardDemo/login_PreK0809.html

33 Prekindergarten Application

34 Manage My School- What Is Captured?

35 Manage My School- Summary

36 Manage Student Records

37 Components gathered in Add New Student Student Information- Name, DOB, Unique student identifier Contact Information Demographic Data- Race/Ethnicity, County where child resides Educational Data- Full day/Half day class, Language of instruction, Reduced Lunch, IEP, etc. Attendance

38 Manage Student Records- Summary

39 Facility Report Completed at year end by the Principal/Director School accreditations Teaching staff- education levels, certifications, types of professional development/trainings attended Curricula used for reading readiness, mathematics and social/emotional development Assessment tools Community partnerships

40 Teacher Self-Report Login

41 Teacher Self-Report Completed by the classroom teacher at year end Information about teaching philosophies and methodologies for early reading, phonological awareness, print and letter recognition, oral language and early math skills Activity planning Physical arrangement of the classroom Types of materials used Monitoring and assessment methods

42 Kindergarten Click Through

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50 Starting Earlier Makes Getting There Easier Expected Rate of Early Reading Growth Documented Growth for At-Risk Children Early Childhood Later Schooling

51 A New Challenge President Obama challenge[s] states to "develop a cutting-edge plan" to raise the bar on the quality of existing early education programs … and make a down payment on the success of the next generation. March 10, 2009

52 For More Information Contact Information Layne Waxley, Project Director, Texas School Ready! Project, Children’s Learning Institute, Thomas.L.Waxley@uth.tmc.eduThomas.L.Waxley@uth.tmc.edu Stephanie Jones-Wood, M.P.H., Program Manager, School Readiness Certification System, Children’s Learning Institute, Stephanie.C.Joneswood@uth.tmc.eduStephanie.C.Joneswood@uth.tmc.edu Jane Thacker, Project Coordinator, School Readiness Certification System, Children’s Learning Institute, Jane.E.Thacker@uth.tmc.edu Jane.E.Thacker@uth.tmc.edu Lisa Payne, M.S., Prekindergarten Program Coordinator, OZ Systems, lpayne@oz-systems.comlpayne@oz-systems.com Shelley Huff, M.S., Kindergarten Program Coordinator, OZ Systems shuff@oz-systems.com Websites Children’s Learning Institute www.childrenslearninginstitute.orgwww.childrenslearninginstitute.org OZ Systems www.oz-systems.comwww.oz-systems.com Texas Education Agency www.tea.state.tx.uswww.tea.state.tx.us NCCIC http://nccic.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfmhttp://nccic.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm NIEER www.nieer.orgwww.nieer.org


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