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1 Plagiarism and Cheating What does this REALLY mean to you? Adapted with permission from other sources by Nancy Elder Shorewood H.S. 1.

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Presentation on theme: "1 Plagiarism and Cheating What does this REALLY mean to you? Adapted with permission from other sources by Nancy Elder Shorewood H.S. 1."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 Plagiarism and Cheating What does this REALLY mean to you? Adapted with permission from other sources by Nancy Elder Shorewood H.S. 1

2 2 Objectives Read about examples of plagiarism/cheating and the consequences in the real world. Learn more about plagiarism and cheating: What plagiarism and cheating are and how you can avoid doing eitherWhat plagiarism and cheating are and how you can avoid doing either When to cite your sourcesWhen to cite your sources What are the consequences for plagiarism and cheatingWhat are the consequences for plagiarism and cheating 2

3 3 You know something about plagiarism and cheating…Don’t you? Sure you do. Teachers have been talking (and talking, and talking) about plagiarism and cheating—and how you should avoid it. But, if it is so bad, why do students (and adults) do it? 3

4 Why do students plagiarize? Here are some excuses… Why does it matter? My (pick one of the following) teacher/parent/guardian doesn’t care if I do it. I didn’t understand the assignment and I needed some help. I didn’t know that I had to cite my sources. Everybody else does it. Why not me, too? The assignment was dumb/boring/too hard/too easy/etc., so why should I put my effort into it?

5 Why do students plagiarize? Here are some excuses… Why does it matter? My (pick one of the following) teacher/parent/guardian doesn’t care if I do it. I had to. I need to have good grades. I didn’t have the time to do the work on my own. I had work/rehearsal/practice/etc. I didn’t understand the assignment and I needed some help. I didn’t know that I had to cite my sources. Everybody else does it. Why not me, too? The assignment was dumb/boring/too hard/too easy/etc., so why should I put my effort into it?

6 But those are weak excuses … There is no acceptable reason for plagiarism or cheating. Plagiarism is cheating and it will be treated seriously if it is found in your work. Look at these real life examples…

7 Real Life Plagiarism Scandals Doris Kearns Goodwin, a Pulitzer Prize winning historian, was forced to step down from the Pulitzer board after she was found to have accidentally used another’s words in one of her books. Disgraced Hostetter, Janet. 6 Apr Associated Press Images. 5 Aug Kirpatrick, David D. “Author Goodwin Resigns from Pulitzer Board.” New York Times. (1 June 2002.) 5 Aug

8 Real Life Plagiarism Scandals After being accused of rampant plagiarism in her work, tenured professor Madonna G. Constantine was fired from her position at Columbia University. Fired Bondafeff, Dian. 10 Oct Associated Press Images. 5 Aug Santora, Marc. “Columbia Professor in Noose Case Is Fired on Plagiarism Charges.” New York Times. (24 June 2008.) 5 Aug

9 Real Life Plagiarism Scandals As a reporter for the New York Times, Jayson Blair plagiarized or fabricated in more than 40 stories between 2002 and He was fired from his job. The top two editors of the newspaper resigned as a result of the scandal. Forced to give up career “Correcting the Record.” New York Times. 11 May The New York Times. 5 Aug Image: Szymaszek, Jennifer. 12 May Associated Press Images. 5 Aug 2008.

10 Real Life Plagiarism Scandals Blair Hornstein was the valedictorian of her high school class and had earned admission to Harvard University. After articles Hornstein wrote for a local newspaper were discovered to have been plagiarized, Harvard University withdrew their acceptance. Admission Revoked Harvard Capuzzo, Jill P. “MOORESTOWN JOURNAL; Seeing Crimson.” New York Times. (20 July 2003.) 5 Aug “Blair Hornstein.” The Gothamist. 14 July Aug

11 How is Plagiarism and Cheating defined at Shorewood?

12 Definition of Plagiarism using the writings, passages, ideas, of others and passing them off as one’s own work;using the writings, passages, ideas, of others and passing them off as one’s own work; using an outside source without proper acknowledgement;using an outside source without proper acknowledgement; submitting or using falsified data or recordssubmitting or using falsified data or records

13 Definition of Cheating acting dishonestly and practicing fraud (deliberate deception in order to secure unfair gain): acting dishonestly and practicing fraud (deliberate deception in order to secure unfair gain): assisting, encouraging, inciting, helping or participating in misrepresenting someone’s work as your own; assisting, encouraging, inciting, helping or participating in misrepresenting someone’s work as your own; “wandering eyes” (allowing ones eyes to stray to another persons work, quizzes or tests); or “wandering eyes” (allowing ones eyes to stray to another persons work, quizzes or tests); or using unauthorized material including textbooks, notes, calculators or computer programs during an examination or other assignment. using unauthorized material including textbooks, notes, calculators or computer programs during an examination or other assignment.

14 School Consequences 1st offense: Student is referred to principal/designee, student’s performance on assignment or activity shall receive a zero. Parents shall be notified. 1st offense: Student is referred to principal/designee, student’s performance on assignment or activity shall receive a zero. Parents shall be notified. 2nd offense: Student is long term suspended from the class for the remainder of the semester. This may be the same or different class from the 1st offense. Established suspension process with due process will be used. 2nd offense: Student is long term suspended from the class for the remainder of the semester. This may be the same or different class from the 1st offense. Established suspension process with due process will be used. 3rd offense: Student is long term suspended from all classes for the remainder of the semester. Parents shall be contacted and due process rights shall be given. 3rd offense: Student is long term suspended from all classes for the remainder of the semester. Parents shall be contacted and due process rights shall be given.

15 Think you’ve got it? Read the following… (and pay attention! There will be a quiz on this information at the end!)

16 Let’s look at some hypothetical situations. For each, determine if the student plagiarized or cheat or did not. Decide on your answer before you move to the next slide.

17 Jack’s Situation Jack has an English paper due tomorrow. He read the book and paid attention during class, but he has no idea what to write about. Jack logs onto the Internet to get some ideas about topics for his paper. He finds a great idea and begins writing his paper using the topic he found. He is very careful to avoid copying any text or words from the Internet article he found. Is this plagiarism?

18 Jack DID plagiarize. Jack’s actions constitute plagiarism. Jack is committing plagiarism by taking the ideas of the source without citing them in the paper.Jack is committing plagiarism by taking the ideas of the source without citing them in the paper. Even though he put the ideas in his own words, Jack is stealing ideas from the source.Even though he put the ideas in his own words, Jack is stealing ideas from the source.

19 Jill’s Situation During history class, Jill is asked to find some background on Fidel Castro’s rise to power. Jill does a Google search and arrives at Wikipedia’s article on Fidel Castro. Without using quotation marks, Jill cuts and pastes several sentences from Wikipedia into her assignment. Is this plagiarism?

20 Jill DID plagiarize. Jill’s actions constitute plagiarism. By taking the words from the Wikipedia article, Jill is committing plagiarism.By taking the words from the Wikipedia article, Jill is committing plagiarism. She can avoid plagiarizing by quoting the article in her assignment and including an entry that describes the source in a bibliography at the end of her paper.She can avoid plagiarizing by quoting the article in her assignment and including an entry that describes the source in a bibliography at the end of her paper.

21 Gretel’s Situation Gretel is a freshman who is having trouble keeping up with work. When her science teacher assigns a short worksheet on genetics, Gretel is confused and frustrated. During lunch, Gretel borrows her friend’s paper and copies the answers onto her own paper. Is this cheating?

22 Gretel DID cheat. Gretel’s actions constitute cheat. Even if Gretel’s friend gave permission for Gretel to copy her work, it is still plagiarism. If Gretel’s friend gave her permission, her friend is also guilty of cheating.Even if Gretel’s friend gave permission for Gretel to copy her work, it is still plagiarism. If Gretel’s friend gave her permission, her friend is also guilty of cheating. Gretel is guilty of cheating. She tried to take credit for the words and ideas of another person.Gretel is guilty of cheating. She tried to take credit for the words and ideas of another person.

23 How to Avoid Plagiarism and Cheating Cite the source of any idea or words you take from anyone else. Use quotation marks to mark the beginning and end of the source’s words. Write a bibliography (a list of your sources) to show your sources. Do you own work!

24 Resources Plagarism PPT by Michelle Kramer & Sherri Miller, Mount Lebanon High School, Pittsburgh, PA Plagarism PPT by Michelle Kramer & Sherri Miller, Mount Lebanon High School, Pittsburgh, PA Plagarism PPT by Barb Lachman, Shorewood High School Plagarism PPT by Barb Lachman, Shorewood High School Shoreline School District Statement of Responsibilities and Rights of Students Shoreline School District Statement of Responsibilities and Rights of Students


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