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Phase 1 Module 3 Leading FoR 3-6 in your school NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre Leading FoR 3-6 differentiation.

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Presentation on theme: "Phase 1 Module 3 Leading FoR 3-6 in your school NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre Leading FoR 3-6 differentiation."— Presentation transcript:

1 Phase 1 Module 3 Leading FoR 3-6 in your school NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre Leading FoR 3-6 differentiation

2 Phase 1 Module 3 Leading FoR 3-6 in your school NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre Acknowledgement of Country We acknowledge the traditional Custodians of this Land, where the Aboriginal People have performed age-old ceremonies of storytelling, music, dance and celebration. We acknowledge and pay respect to the Elders past and present, and we acknowledge those of the future, for they will hold the memories, traditions and hopes of Aboriginal Australians. We must always remember that under the concrete and asphalt this Land is, was, and always will be traditional Aboriginal Land.

3 Phase 1 Module 3 Leading FoR 3-6 in your school NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre Professional Teaching Standards

4 Phase 1 Module 3 Leading FoR 3-6 in your school NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre Leading Focus on Reading 3-6 in your school program Module 1 1 x 2hr Module 1 1 x 2hr Between-module tasks Module 4 1 x 2hr Module 4 1 x 2hr Module 3 1 x 2hr Module 3 1 x 2hr Module 2 1 x 2hr Module 2 1 x 2hr Leadership FoR and of 3-6 literacy learning Leadership FoR and of 3-6 literacy learning Culture FoR 3-6 comprehension Culture FoR 3-6 comprehension Leading FoR 3-6 differentiation Leading FoR 3-6 differentiation Leading FoR 3-6 success Leading FoR 3-6 success

5 Phase 1 Module 3 Leading FoR 3-6 in your school NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre Making connections...

6 Phase 1 Module 3 Leading FoR 3-6 in your school NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre During this session, you will:  develop an understanding that differentiated instruction is designed to maximise each student’s growth and individual success  develop an understanding of how school leaders can support differentiated instruction. Moral purpose professional learning precision personalisation

7 Phase 1 Module 3 Leading FoR 3-6 in your school NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre It’s really about commitment... Providing leadership for effective differentiated classrooms across schools and districts is really about the will to do what we know to do. Tomlinson, C. & Demirsky Allan, S. (2006) Leadership for differentiating schools and classrooms, Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, Alexandria, Virginia, p. 137.

8 Phase 1 Module 3 Leading FoR 3-6 in your school NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre No two children are alike. No two children learn in an identical way. An enriched environment for one student is not necessarily enriched for another. In the classroom, we should teach children to think for themselves. Brain research confirms what experienced teachers have always known: Why differentiate?

9 Phase 1 Module 3 Leading FoR 3-6 in your school NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre  Differentiated instruction, also called differentiation, is a process through which teachers enhance learning by matching student characteristics to instruction and assessment.  Differentiated instruction allows all students to access the same classroom curriculum by providing entry points, learning tasks, and outcomes that are tailored to students' needs (Hall, Strangman & Meyer, 2003 ).  Differentiated instruction is not a single strategy, but rather an approach to instruction that incorporates a variety of strategies. Access Centre, 2004 What is differentiation?

10 Phase 1 Module 3 Leading FoR 3-6 in your school NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre  increasingly proficient in understanding their students as individuals,  increasingly comfortable with the meaning and structure of the disciplines they teach  increasingly expert at teaching flexibility in order to match instruction to student need with the goal of maximising the potential of each learner in a given area. responsive instruction Differentiated instruction is responsive instruction. It occurs as teachers become: (Carol Ann Tomlinson, 2003)

11 Phase 1 Module 3 Leading FoR 3-6 in your school NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre 1.A differentiated classroom is flexible. 2.Differentiation of instruction stems from effective and ongoing assessment of learner needs. 3.Flexible grouping helps ensure student access to a wide variety of learning opportunities and working arrangements. 4.All students consistently work with ‘respectful’ activities and learning arrangements. 5.Students and teachers are collaborators in learning. (T omlinson & Allan, 2000) Key principles that support differentiation

12 Phase 1 Module 3 Leading FoR 3-6 in your school NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre is a teacher’s response to a learner’s needs. Guided by general principles of differentiation, such as Differentiation of instruction

13 Phase 1 Module 3 Leading FoR 3-6 in your school NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre Flexible grouping is an instructional strategy where students are grouped together to receive appropriately challenging instruction. True flexible grouping permits students to move in and out of various grouping patterns, depending on the course content. Grouping can be determined by ability, size and/or interest. National Association for Gifted Children Flexible grouping: A definition Task

14 Phase 1 Module 3 Leading FoR 3-6 in your school NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre When I think of flexible grouping, I picture working with sandcastles that the tide will wash away. I think of ability-grouping as working with concrete to build permanent foundations meant to withstand change. Opitz, Michael (2005) Empowering the reader in every child: The case for flexible grouping when teaching reading

15 Phase 1 Module 3 Leading FoR 3-6 in your school NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre Flexible grouping is the heart of differentiated instruction. grouping based on formative assessment short periods of time targeted instructional strategy formative assessment used to determine effectiveness groups will vary fluid permanent same instruction as large group tracking extra work repetitive worksheets Round Robin reading drill, drill, drill. What is it? What is it not? Flexible grouping Heacox, Diane (2001) Differentiating instruction in the regular classroom

16 Phase 1 Module 3 Leading FoR 3-6 in your school NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre “… quality literacy teaching involves a continuous cycle of assessing, teaching and learning.”

17 Phase 1 Module 3 Leading FoR 3-6 in your school NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre Teachers can differentiate: content process product learning environment according to students ’ readiness interests learning profile through a range of instructional and management strategies.

18 Phase 1 Module 3 Leading FoR 3-6 in your school NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre Ways to differentiate according to readiness interests learning profile

19 Phase 1 Module 3 Leading FoR 3-6 in your school NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre Each time you provide a student with extra help, more time or a modified assignment, you’re differentiating instruction. All good teachers, whether they realise it or not, differentiate to some degree. (Diane Heacox, 2001) It’s not new

20 Phase 1 Module 3 Leading FoR 3-6 in your school NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre The ‘What’ and ‘How’ of differentiation Leaders for responsive, personalised or differentiated classrooms focus much of their professional energy on two fronts:  what it means to teach individual learners effectively AND  how to extend the number of classrooms in which that sort of teaching becomes the norm.

21 Phase 1 Module 3 Leading FoR 3-6 in your school NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre THE WHAT  high-level, idea-based instruction using key skills to understand and apply the ideas employing key principles of differentiation: - flexible grouping - respectful activities - ongoing assessment and adjustment  modifying content, process and product based on student readiness, interest and learning profile using a range of student-centred, meaning-making instructional strategies  coaching for individual growth with the goal of moving each student as far and fast as possible  assessing student growth at least in significant measure according to personal growth. THE HOW  clarity of purpose and vision  systemic efforts  generalist/specialist partnerships for classroom application  time and support for collaboration  structured lesson (curriculum) planning and instructional evaluation  focused staff development with plans for transfer  incentives for classroom application  aligned and focused policies and initiatives  coherent leadership  integration with professional growth and accountability  formative and summative evaluation of efforts and use of findings  involvement of parents in understanding and contributing to assessment of change  persistence over time. Tomlinson, C. & Demirsky Allan, S. (2006) Leadership for differentiating schools and classrooms, Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, p Balancing the equation to make differentiation work

22 Phase 1 Module 3 Leading FoR 3-6 in your school NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre Essential principles to guide change for Differentiation 1.Change is imperative in today’s classrooms. 2.The focus of schools’ change must be classroom practice. 3.For schools to become what they ought to be, we need systemic change. 4.Change is difficult, slow and uncertain. 5.Systemic change requires both leadership and administration. 6.To change schools, we must change the culture of schools. 7.What leaders do speaks with greater force than what they say. 8.Change efforts need to link with a wider world. 9.Leaders for change have a results-based orientation. (Tomlinson and Allan, 2006, p. 34)

23 Phase 1 Module 3 Leading FoR 3-6 in your school NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre 2.Basis in theory and research 1.Understanding differentiated instruction 3. What leaders for differentiation need to know 4. Establishing conditions to initiate systemic change 5. Practical strategies for implementing a differentiation growth plan 8. Communicating with parents and the public 6. Staff development that supports differentiation 7. Continuation of systemic growth toward differentiation 9. A case study of change in process 10. Planning for the ‘what’ and ’how’ of differentiation Leadership for differentiating schools and classrooms by Carol Ann Tomlinson and Susan Demirsky Allan

24 Phase 1 Module 3 Leading FoR 3-6 in your school NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre Leadership FoR 3-6 differentiation PHASE 1:  Modelled guided and independent teaching = Releasing control  Explicit teaching of Comprehension meta-cognitive strategies  Differentiating content, product, process and learning environment  Scaffolding  Fluid and flexible groupings Provide recognition for teacher efforts and growth.

25 Phase 1 Module 3 Leading FoR 3-6 in your school NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre Task Consider key principles of and strategies for differentiated instruction Use the mind map to prioritise ways to Differentiate instruction in classrooms. Use the mind map to prioritise ways to Differentiate instruction in classrooms.

26 Phase 1 Module 3 Leading FoR 3-6 in your school NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre Reflection Consider how the concept of differentiation connects with the ‘Triple P’ model. Record your thoughts.

27 Phase 1 Module 3 Leading FoR 3-6 in your school NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre Access Center (2004).Differentiated instruction for reading, Washington, D.C. Hammond, J. & Gibbons, P. (2001) What is scaffolding? Scaffolding: teaching and learning in language and literacy education, Primary English Teaching Association (PETA), Sydney. Heacox, Diane (2001) Differentiating instruction in the regular classroom, Freespirit Publishing Inc, Minneapolis, Minnesota. Opitz, M. (2005) ‘Empowering the reader in every child: The case for flexible grouping when teaching reading’, Instructor, Volume 108, Issues 1-6, Scholastic, Inc., Original from the University of Virginia. Tomlinson, C. (1999) The differentiated classroom: Responding to the needs of all learners, Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, Alexandria, Virginia, USA. Bibliography

28 Phase 1 Module 3 Leading FoR 3-6 in your school NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre Tomlinson, C. A. (2001) How to differentiate instruction in mixed ability classrooms, Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, Alexandria, Virginia, USA. Tomlinson, C. A. (2003) Fulfilling the promise of the differentiated classroom, Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, Alexandria, Virginia, USA. Tomlinson, C. A. & Allan, S.D. (2006) Leadership for differentiating schools & classrooms, Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, Alexandria, Virginia, USA. Bibliography (cont’d)


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