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Research Resources for ENG 4330G: The Prostitute in Literature and History, 1660-1800 – January 15, 2009 – Christy Sich and John Tyndall The D.B. Weldon.

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Presentation on theme: "Research Resources for ENG 4330G: The Prostitute in Literature and History, 1660-1800 – January 15, 2009 – Christy Sich and John Tyndall The D.B. Weldon."— Presentation transcript:

1 Research Resources for ENG 4330G: The Prostitute in Literature and History, – January 15, 2009 – Christy Sich and John Tyndall The D.B. Weldon Library

2 What we’ll (un)cover today… ENG 4330G Bibliography Assignment Citing Sources Finding Literary and Historical Research Resources –Secondary Sources (John) –Primary Sources (Christy)

3 ENG 4330G Bibliography Assignment Part A (due March 12 th in class) –Topic Introduction –Preliminary Bibliography (10 sources) Part B (due April 12 with final essay) –Bibliography –Final essay: pp. (approx words) –Prof. Conway encourages you to use theoretical material to help frame your arguments

4 The Research Process Start with the general… 1)Choose your topic. 2)Determine what you already know. 3)Find background information. 4)Search for scholarly resources. 5)Incorporate new knowledge. 6)Acknowledge your sources. … and move to the specific.

5 Think, Pair, Share (Activity) 1)Think Read through the topic and think about how you would begin your research. Think about where you would look for information and provide rationale for your choice(s) * 2 minutes * 2)Pair Compare notes/thoughts with a neighbour. Did you come up with the same strategy? Come to consensus on the best approach. * 2 – 4 minutes * 3)Share Share with the class the research strategies you discussed and explain the rationale you used to make your choice(s). * 6 – 10 minutes *

6 Think, Pair, Share (Background) Brainstorming Keywords Familiarize yourself with the language used in various sources What did you do while I was at Work today? Oh, I’ve just been agreeably perusing a volume bearing the appellation of “The Thesaurus”. © Matthew K. Tabor

7 Think, Pair, Share (Topic) Think of as many synonyms for the word ‘prostitute’ as you can (keeping in mind the context of course). How would you find additional search terms? Where would you look?

8 Think, Pair, Share (Summary) What did we learn? –Some resources are more appropriate for academic research than others. –There are many ways to approach research, and even more places to look for information! –Comparing notes with peers is a good way to ensure that you’re on the right track… –Seeking assistance from the experts (e.g. Professor Conway or library staff) can save you time and energy!

9 The Research Process (Working Example) Why does Mary Wollstonecraft value rationality so highly in Vindication of the Rights of Woman? Mary Wollstonecraft, by John Opie, c.1797

10 Finding Background Info. (Working Example) Mary Wollstonecraft, by John Opie, c.1797 Bibliographies, Dictionaries, Encyclopedias, Handbooks, etc. The Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (ODNB) Oxford Reference Online Gale Group Literary Index The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) The Johns Hopkins Guide to Literary Theory and Criticism

11 Finding Background Info. (Working Example) Mary Wollstonecraft, by John Opie, c.1797 Begin at the Western Libraries homepage (http://www.lib.uwo.ca)

12 Finding Background Info. (cont’d)

13

14

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17 Oxford English Dictionary (OED)

18 prostitute

19 Oxford English Dictionary (OED)

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21 Oxford Dictionary of National Biography

22 Wollstonecraft, Mary

23 Oxford Dictionary of National Biography

24 Finding Scholarly Sources (books)

25 OR

26 Finding Scholarly Sources (books)

27 (prostitut* or harlot*) and litera* and criticism

28 Finding Scholarly Sources (books)

29

30

31 291 results 25 results 1025 results

32 Finding Scholarly Sources (articles)

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34 Historical Abstracts (search page) Wollstonecraft vindication

35 Historical Abstracts (search results)

36 Historical Abstracts (article record)

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38 Finding Scholarly Sources (articles)

39 Limit Search to Articles Only

40 The Research Process Start with the general… 1)Choose your topic. 2)Determine what you already know. 3)Find background information. 4)Search for scholarly resources. 5)Incorporate new knowledge. 6)Acknowledge your sources. … and move to the specific.

41 Finding Primary Sources A Candlelight Scene: A Man Offering a Gold Chain and Coins to a Girl Seated on a Bed, c (oil on copper), Schalken or Schalcken, Godfried ( ) / National Gallery, London, UK, / The Bridgeman Art Library

42 Finding Primary Sources Why do you need to find primary sources for your research in this course? – to situate the literature in its proper historical context (e.g. to better understand the economic, social and political climate in England from , which influenced writers of the day). – to ground your secondary research in historical fact (and therefore, impress Prof. Conway)!

43 Finding Primary Sources Q: What kinds of sources do you think would qualify as ‘primary’ research resources? Letters Diaries Unpublished Papers 17 th & 18 th C. Newspaper / Journal Articles Books published in the 17th & 18th C. Memoirs Interviews 17th & 18th C. Visual Art

44 Finding Primary Sources Accessible via access points we’ve already reviewed, including: – The Shared Library Catalogue – Resources by Subject (esp. History pages) – Databases by Title Because we already know what we’re looking for (see handout), we’ll stick with Databases by Title.

45 Finding Primary Sources A few recommended research tools that will help you access primary research relevant to this course include: Orlando: Women’s Writing in the British Isles Eighteenth Century Collection Online (ECCO) Defining Gender, British and Irish Women’s Letters and Diaries,

46 Finding Primary Sources - Orlando

47 Wollstonecraft

48 Finding Primary Sources - Orlando

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50

51 Finding Primary Sources - ECCO

52 “vindication of the rights of woman”

53 Finding Primary Sources - ECCO

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55

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57 rational*

58 Finding Primary Sources - ECCO

59 Primary Sources – Defining Gender prostitut*

60 Primary Sources – Defining Gender

61

62 Finding Scholarly Sources both secondary and primary research materials are appropriate to use for this course remember to incorporate critical theory (cultural, feminist, literary, etc.) if you can allow adequate time for research (do not wait until the last minute)

63 Acknowledging Your Sources The final, but most important step in the research process… no matter what you take from the research (an idea, a direct quote, a point-of-view), you need to cite its source

64 Acknowledging Your Sources Citation Scramble!!!

65 Citation Scramble New Brunswick: Anthony, Susan B The Selected Papers of Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony, Volume I: In the School of Anti-Slavery 1840 to 1866, ed. Ann D.Gordon. Rutgers University Press In The Cambridge Companion to Mary Wollstonecraft, ed. Claudia Johnson. pp. 141– 59. Cambridge: " Mary Wollstonecraft's A Vindication of the Rights of Woman and the Woman Writers of Her Day." Mellor, Anne. Cambridge University Press, Studies of Interactions between Life and Art in English Romantic Literature, Donald H.Reiman, Michael C.Jaye, and Betty T.Bennett. Thiébaux, Marcelle. In The Evidence of Imagination: ed. New York: New York University Press, pp. 195– " Mary Wollstonecraft in Federalist America, 1791–1802." How quickly can you identify the author?

66 Citation Scramble Anthony, Susan B. “In the School of Anti-Slavery 1840 to 1866.” The Selected Papers of Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony. Vol.1. Ed. Ann D.Gordon. New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press, Mellor, Anne. “Mary Wollstonecraft's A Vindication of the Rights of Woman and the Woman Writers of Her Day." The Cambridge Companion to Mary Wollstonecraft. Ed. Claudia Johnson. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press: – 59. Thiébaux, Marcelle. "Mary Wollstonecraft in Federalist America, 1791– 1802." The Evidence of Imagination: Studies of Interactions Between Life and Art in English Romantic Literature. Ed. Donald H.Reiman, Michael C. Jaye and Betty T. Bennett. New York: New York University Press: – 228. …and now with correct citation style?

67 Acknowledging Your Sources MLA (Modern Language Association) Handbook for Writers of Research Papers, 6th Edition –copies available on 2-Hour Loan, and in the Reference Collection of The D.B. Weldon Library (Call Number: LB2369.G ) –electronic guides also available on The D.B. Weldon Library website:

68 The Research Process Start with the general… … and move to the specific. 1)Choose your topic. 2)Determine what you already know. 3)Find background information. 4)Search for scholarly resources. 5)Incorporate new knowledge. 6)Acknowledge your sources.

69 When you need help… Come and see us! Research & Instruction Services Staff, The D.B. Weldon Library

70 Questions? Thank you and Good Luck!


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