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NEW ALBANY HOUSING AUTHORITY Stephanie Richardson, Sarah McIntire, Nicole Anaya, Erika Johnson, Lyndon Moore, Meghan Hall, Morgan Burke, Katie Conrad.

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Presentation on theme: "NEW ALBANY HOUSING AUTHORITY Stephanie Richardson, Sarah McIntire, Nicole Anaya, Erika Johnson, Lyndon Moore, Meghan Hall, Morgan Burke, Katie Conrad."— Presentation transcript:

1 NEW ALBANY HOUSING AUTHORITY Stephanie Richardson, Sarah McIntire, Nicole Anaya, Erika Johnson, Lyndon Moore, Meghan Hall, Morgan Burke, Katie Conrad

2 Population New Albany Housing Authority is located in New Albany, Indiana. (Floyd County) NAHA serves approximately 2,182 people during Most houses stay filled with the exception of renovations. Mark Elrod & Riverview Towers are high-rise buildings.

3 Diversity 38.1% Caucasian 51.7% African-American 10.2 % Hispanic Mark Elrod Ages 55+ Riverview Towers years of age

4 Income Average income is approximately $9, This is dramatically lower than the amount stated by Floyd, County of $25, 971. This could be in correlation with the education levels of the housing authority in comparison to the county. Floyd County states that 87.3% of its residents have a high school diploma or equivalent, compared to 67.3% of the NAHA population.

5 Health Status 31% of residents are obese, compared to 20% of Floyd County 8.3% are of low birth weight born in 2012 Interviews conducted with NAHA residents show a high rate of hypertension & diabetes in young adults and children

6 Food Resources The residents of NAHA have access to a nearby Kroger, that is approx. 0.9 mile away or a 17-minute walk. Kroger provides access to fresh fruits, vegetables and other food items. However, County Health and Rankings Roadmaps reports that 63% of all restaurants in Floyd County are fast-food establishments.

7 Food Assistance Hope Southern Indiana is a family and emergency services department that serves residents of Floyd County. Hope provides assistance with food once every thirty days up to eight times per year. There are several food pantries and soup kitchens in the area, including Dwelling Place Ministries, the Salvation Army, the Tri-County Health Coalition, and several churches in New Albany.

8 Target Population Our target population for this promotion proposal is low income residents of NAHA This proposed “lunch and learn” was designed to provide information about affordable nutritional meals to anyone living within a unit managed by the NAHA including but not limited to Mark Elrod Tower, Riverview Tower, and Parkview Broadmead Terrace. The main focus will be on those currently on the Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program (SNAP), however all wishing to participate would be accepted.

9 Expecting & New Moms Three expecting moms were interviewed. Two of the three were pregnant for the first time. All three moms had difficulty managing food stamps for the entire month. They were also concerned with their lack of knowledge on what to eat while pregnant.

10 Families with Young Children Four moms and one dad were interviewed. Nutrition was less of a concern because breakfast and lunch are served at school for their children for free or at a reduced cost. NAHA provides an after school snack. Main concern seemed to be budgeting food stamps. When not in school, a lot of kids are on their own and given money to buy snacks at local convenient store. Poor food choices can lead to obesity.

11 Families with Young Children, cont’d… Girl scout meeting. Talked with troop leader. Leads two groups from NAHA. Stated that younger group always seemed to show up hungry. In the older group, some girls were overweight and showing signs of obesity.

12 Family Support Services Center Section 8 Housing Office

13 Mark Elrod Tower Mark Elrod Tower is for residents ages 62 and over 101 residents currently occupy the Tower. Residents rent is based on monthly income and expenses such as living and medical. All residents are capable of living independently Some residents have been in the building for over 20 years

14 Activities with the Residents Get fit, physical activities including balloon volleyball. FEMA awareness: Information for the elderly, disabled and those with animals on how to prepare and respond for a disaster. Halloween Party Fine motor skills were incorporated into making Halloween mask and decorations.

15 Mark Elrod Tower

16 Riverview Tower There are 164 units available for tenants The population is ages 50+ years old Several tenants at Riverview Tower have disabilities Disabilities include respiratory problems, hypertension, obesity, alcoholism, mental illness, and diabetes Interviews with various residents were conducted, both formally and informally, during the morning and afternoon.

17 Riverview Towers

18 Statement of the Problem After assessing the community and conducting many key informant interviews it became clear that affordable nutrition and nutrition education was a major problem among the community. Staff of NAHA also states there is a definite lack of knowledge when concerning the aspects of preparing a nutritionally sound meal at home while on a limited budget.

19 Literature Review Keyserling et al. (1999) nurse delivered nutrition counseling of the elderly, low income population has proven to be effective in the reducing the cholesterol of participants. Brown and Hanis (1995) found that collaboration in education by a nurse, dietician and community worker could help to increase diabetes knowledge, decrease fasting blood glucose levels, and increase knowledge about diabetes control. This study was done in low income families.

20 Literature Review, cont’d. Sultemeier (1988) suggests that group teaching in low- income pregnant women results in greater compliance with improved nutrition intake in comparison to individualized teaching. Widga and Lewis (1999) found that there is significant improvement in prenatal nutrition in low-income women after prenatal, in-home visits. The in-home visits must include: weight-gain monitoring, an individualized dietary intake assessment, nutrition education, and counseling.

21 Cultural Influences on Health Benefits and Practices NAHA is divided into several sub-populations: elderly, young, single mothers, and families. They all share a commonality of being a part of a low- income population. After several interviews with the residents, we concluded that the majority wanted to live healthier lives, but either lacked the resources, funding, or knowledge of how to utilize the resources available to them.

22 Cultural Influences on Health Benefits and Practices, cont’d. Majority of the population does not have a primary healthcare provider. -Seek care from Floyd Memorial Hospital’s E.D. for simple medical issues such as a sore throat or cold. -Some of the residents wait in the E.D. all day to be seen. -This conflicts with society’s belief of using the E.D. for emergency medical attention, and visiting one’s primary physician for less serious medical issues. Another barrier the residents face is that it is more expensive to eat healthier. -Fresh produce is more expensive in comparison to processed foods. -Processed foods fit more easily into one’s budget, are less time consuming to prepare, and are more easily accessible.

23 Cultural Influences on Health Benefits and Practices, cont’d. The values and beliefs of low-income individuals may differ than those of middle or upper class individuals in the respect of what is considered a “Want versus a need.” -Low-income individuals are in “Survival mode.” -Example: Society may consider getting immunizations for their children as a necessity, while those of low-income families may view this as a luxury. -The low-income family’s main concern might be being able to provide food and shelter for their family. Each families’ priorities are different. -Example: Society may judge an elderly individual as non-compliant if they do not take their medications, when in actuality, they may be choosing between paying for food or medications.

24 Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs

25 Cultural Influences on Health Benefits and Practices, cont’d. We chose a project that we believed would benefit the overall population, based on what we learned in our assessment. -Nutrition seemed to be a concern throughout each sub-population We identified any barriers that might prevent residents from attending the lunch and learn and tried to overcome them by: -Involving the population in planning -Choosing a suitable time and easily accessible location to host the lunch and learn -Providing childcare -Making a mini cook book with meals that fit their budgets and were less time consuming to make -Providing a yoga instructor for an hour session to promote fitness -Bring in a dietician to speak and answer questions

26 Objectives Long-Term Goal Healthy People 2020 Objective: Promote health and reduce chronic disease risk through the consumption of healthful diets and achievement and maintenance of healthy body weights

27 Objectives, cont’d. Short-Term Goals Residents of NAHA will participate in “Lunch and Learn” activity designed to increase knowledge of basic nutrition with a focus on healthy, affordable meals. Residents will report that they plan to improve their eating habits. Residents will have increased ability to make healthy food choices. Residents will have a better understanding of how to read nutrition labels. Residents will have increased understanding of how to prepare a meal.

28 Significance of the Project With assessment, a need for nutritional information was evident. With healthy foods known to be more expensive than pre- packaged, processed food, it is thought that people on a budget cannot afford to eat healthy. If people are taught how to shop wisely, eating healthy can be accomplished even with a low income. With this project, the residents of the New Albany Housing Authority will gain the knowledge of how to shop and eat healthy on a budget. With this knowledge, they can improve the lives of themselves, their family and pass what they have learned along to their children. Residents can live healthy lives, cutting down on their risks of many life threatening diseases.

29 Planning and Methodology Educational Content Presentation Cookbook Nutrition Posters Meal Choice Preparation Location and Time Advertisement Community Resources FMH Healthier Community Outreach Program Massage Therapist/Yoga Instructor Funding Sponsors Food Supplies Door Prizes

30 Brief Budgeting and Justification

31 MaterialsUseEstimated Expense What we paid Advertising Cost 50 FlyersAdvertising the event$37.50$0 donation from IUS Event Cost 50 Cook Books Resource for participants to take with them so they can practice what they learned$50.00 $0 donation from IUS Healthy meal provided for 50 people Attract participant attendance and introduce a healthy meal that is easy to make $200 $0 Floyd Hospital donation Eating UtensilsRequired for meal$15$0 Floyd Hospital donation Dietician/ NutritionistEducate the participants about healthy eating $250$0 Donation of time Yoga Instructor Teach the participants different yoga techniques to increase health of mind and body $135 $0 Donation of time Door Prizes Attract participant attendance$ $0 Nick Stein Attorney at Law Donation (turkey dinners), Judy Myer’s (shirts, cups, etc.), IUS bookstore (Shirts) Door Prize TicketsOrganization$5.00 $0 Floyd Hospital donation TOTAL $952.50

32 “Lunch and Learn”

33 “Lunch and Learn,” cont’d. Recipe Book for Residents

34 “Lunch and Learn,” cont’d. Floyd Memorial Hospital’s Nutritionist, Sallie Niehoff Speaking at Event

35 “Lunch and Learn,” cont’d.

36 Door Prize Raffle “Lunch and Learn,” cont’d.

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38 Survey Results 17 residents participated 6 questions answered Question 1: How helpful did you find the class? Result: 17 out of 17 participants found the class to be “very helpful”

39 Survey Results, cont’d Question 2: Do you feel you would attend future classes?

40 Survey Results, cont’d Question 3: What was most helpful? What residents found helpful: -Reading labels -Salt/Fiber/Fat intake -Portion sizes Majority of the class found overall that most if not all of the content was helpful.

41 Survey Results, cont’d Question 4: What was least helpful?

42 Survey Results, cont’d Question 5: Do you think your eating habits will change after attending this class? If so, how?

43 Survey Results, cont’d Question 6: Comments/Suggestions? Comments: -Excellent information -Very good job explaining -More information on healthy eating -The speaker was very good -It was very interesting -I found the information to be excellent

44 Summary of Evaluation Methods Objectives:Evaluation By: Promote health and reduce chronic disease risk through the consumption of healthful diets and achievement and maintenance of healthy body weights. “Lunch and Learn” content. Content included an overview of nutrition label information such as serving size, calorie count, nutrients, daily values, ingredients, and meal suggestions. Residents of NAHA will participate in “Lunch and Learn” activity designed to increase knowledge of basic nutrition with a focus on healthy, affordable meals. Attendance sheet will determine number of residents in attendance.

45 Summary of Evaluation Methods, cont’d Objectives:Evaluation by: Residents will report that they plan to improve their eating habits. Survey provided at end of “Lunch and Learn” will ask residents if they plan to change their eating habits. Residents will have increased ability to make healthy food choices. Survey provided at end of “Lunch and Learn” will ask residents about future food choices. Residents will have a better understanding of how to read nutrition labels. Survey provided at end of “Lunch and Learn” will ask residents what they learned and what was most helpful. Residents will have increased understanding of how to prepare a meal. Residents will verbalize increased understanding of how to prepare a meal.

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