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Fitness for Life Unit one If you have the optional textbook, read chapters 1 through 4, pages 2-75 Unit one If you have the optional textbook, read chapters.

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Presentation on theme: "Fitness for Life Unit one If you have the optional textbook, read chapters 1 through 4, pages 2-75 Unit one If you have the optional textbook, read chapters."— Presentation transcript:

1 Fitness for Life Unit one If you have the optional textbook, read chapters 1 through 4, pages 2-75 Unit one If you have the optional textbook, read chapters 1 through 4, pages 2-75

2 Unit Objectives By the end of this unit, students should understand... *Differences between physical activity, exercise, and physical fitness. *The difference between health- and skill-related fitness. *Which activities improve cardiovascular fitness, muscular strength & endurance, flexibility, body composition. *The principles of frequency, intensity, time, and type as they relate to fitness development. *The principles of specificity, overload, progression, and reversibility. *The nature of such bone conditions as osteoporosis, scoliosis, kyphosis, and lordosis, and how they respond to exercise. *The relationship between diabetes and exercise. *How to analyze and apply the RICE principles to hyperkinetic (overuse) injuries. *The benefits of physical activity.

3 Starting The Course: Basic Defintions Physical Fitness: ability to carry out the demands of everyday life without getting tired. Physical fitness can be further divided into two categories: Health-related Fitness & Skill-related Fitness.

4 Basic definitions cont’d. Cardiovascular Fitness(or cardiorespiratory fitness) is your body's ability to use oxygen when demands are placed upon it. Health-related Fitness includes aspects of fitness that are related to health. Image from Wikimedia Commons, Chris Brown, Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 GenericCreative CommonsAttribution 2.0 Generic

5 Basic definitions cont’d. Muscular Strength: the amount of weight you can lift one time. Muscular Endurance: the ability to work repeatedly over time. Image from Wikimedia Commons, Caroline Paré, Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 UnportedCreative CommonsAttribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

6 Basic definitions cont’d. Flexibility: your ability to stretch various muscles and joints. Body composition is the components of your body (bone, fat, muscle, etc).

7 Basic definitions cont’d. Balance: the ability to stay upright while stationary or moving. Skill-Related Fitness: aspects of fitness that are related to sport performance. Agility: the ability to change directions quickly. Images from Wikimedia Commons, balance beam: GIMNASIA MADRE_MATILDE, Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic; football -J.Glover, Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.5 GenericGIMNASIA MADRE_MATILDECreative CommonsAttribution 2.0 GenericCreative CommonsAttribution-Share Alike 2.5 Generic

8 Basic definitions cont’d. Coordination: the ability to use your body parts together effectively. Reaction time: the amount of time it takes you to react once you receive a stimulus.

9 Basic definitions cont’d. Speed: the ability to move from one point to another as quickly as possible. Power: the ability to move something heavy very quickly.

10 Basic definitions cont’d. Exercise: planned, structured physical activity designed to improve your physical fitness. Physical Activity: any bodily movement designed to increase your energy expenditure above what you normally do.

11 Making sure you have time for exercise The 10-Minute Rule states that, if you don't feel like exercising, give yourself 10 minutes of physical activity. After that, re-evaluate how you feel before you decide whether to continue.

12 Basic terms of fitness Frequency, refers to the number of times per week you perform an activity. Intensity, measured using heart rate, refers to how hard you are working during an activity. Time, is the length of time or duration of activity, typically reported in minutes, that you perform an activity. Type, is the type of activity that you choose. For best results, choose an activity that you LIKE and will continue to do on a regular basis. FITT: Frequency refers to the number of times per week you perform an activity. Intensity, measured using heart rate, refers to how hard you are working during an activity. Time is the length of time or duration of activity, typically reported in minutes, that you perform an activity. Type is the type of activity that you choose. For best results, choose an activity that you LIKE and will continue to do on a regular basis.

13 Specificity & Overload Specificity means that "you gain what you train for." Overload means that in order to improve fitness, you should do more than you normally would on a regular basis.

14 Progression & reversibility Progression: you should start off slowly and gradually increase the frequency, intensity, and/or duration of your workouts to ensure a safe and effective training program. Reversibility means that you should "use it or lose it."

15 Fitness pyramid The last important concept of fitness development is the "fitness pyramid." The fitness pyramid, like the food pyramid, provides guidelines for participating in different types of physical activity: lifestyle physical activities, aerobic activities, active sports or recreation, muscle strength and endurance, flexibility… and rest.

16 Fitness pyramid

17 Vocabulary Words Learning these words will help you on your exams, quizzes, and assignments. Agility: the ability to change directions quickly. Balance: the ability to maintain an upright position while stationary or moving. Body Composition: the components of your body, including lean body mass and body fat. Cardiovascular Fitness: your body's ability to use oxygen when demands are placed upon it. Coordination: the ability to use your body parts together effectively. Exercise: planned, structured physical activity designed to improve your physical fitness. Flexibility: your ability to stretch various muscles and joints.

18 Vocabulary words cont’d. Frequency: the number of times or days per week that you exercise. Health-Related Fitness: aspects of fitness that are related to health; examples of health-related fitness include: cardiovascular fitness, muscular strength and endurance, flexibility, and body composition. Intensity: how hard you exercise; typically monitored using heart rate. Muscular Strength: the amount of weight you can lift one time.

19 Vocabulary words cont’d. Muscular Endurance: The ability to work repeatedly over time; it can be static (e.g., holding a position for a long period of time; carrying groceries up stairs) or dynamic (e.g., repeatedly lifting something or seeing how many sit- ups you can perform). Overload: The fitness principle that states that you must do more than you normally do to improve your fitness level. Physical Activity: Basic movements, not necessarily designed to improve fitness but to improve health.

20 Vocabulary words cont’d. Physical Activity Pyramid: A framework that should be used to direct one's physical activity participation; makes recommendations for lifestyle activities, aerobic activities, sport/recreational activities, muscular strength & endurance building activities, flexibility activities, and rest. Physical Fitness: The desired outcome of most exercise or physical activity programs; the ability to carry out the demands of everyday life without getting tired; for athletes, physical fitness enables one to effectively compete. Power: The ability to move a heavy weight very quickly.

21 Vocabulary words cont’d. Progression: the fitness principle that states you should start a fitness program slowly and gradually add frequency, intensity, and duration to your program. Reaction Time: the ability to react quickly to a stimulus. Reversibility: the fitness principle that states that you should "use it or lose it;" if you don't continue to train, you will lose benefits acquired. Skill-Related Fitness: aspects of fitness that are related to sport performance (e.g., agility, balance, coordination, reaction time, speed, and power).

22 Vocabulary words cont’d. Specificity: The fitness principle that states "you get what you train for;" if you want to be a sprinter, do sprints to improve. Speed: the ability to move from one point to another very quickly. Ten-Minute Rule: A rule that suggests that if you are tired or unmotivated before exercising, you should give yourself 10 minutes to adapt to exercise. If you feel better after starting exercise, you can happily continue your exercise bout. If you don't feel better after 10 minutes, you can quit your exercise bout and try again later. Time or Duration: The amount of time you spend in each exercise bout.

23 Now that you are finished reading the information from this unit, please complete the following assignments: Cardiovascular Health Risk Profile Activity log 1 & parent contact form Body composition Activity log 2, and Take the unit 1 quiz.

24 Finishing Unit 1 Give yourself approximately two weeks to complete these assignments and send them to your teacher as soon as you complete them. When you are finished with all of this, you can begin reading the material for Unit 2.


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