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National Black Nurses Association, Inc. 38 th Annual Institute and Conference Fran Roberts, RN, PhD Chair, American Heart Association’s 2010 “Go Red For.

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Presentation on theme: "National Black Nurses Association, Inc. 38 th Annual Institute and Conference Fran Roberts, RN, PhD Chair, American Heart Association’s 2010 “Go Red For."— Presentation transcript:

1 National Black Nurses Association, Inc. 38 th Annual Institute and Conference Fran Roberts, RN, PhD Chair, American Heart Association’s 2010 “Go Red For Women” Campaign for Greater Phoenix August 6, 2010

2 In total, of the women who die each year, one in three die from cardiovascular disease (CVD). Nearly half (49%) of all non-Hispanic African American women have some form of heart disease, stroke, or CVD.

3 The Facts about Heart Disease and Women Heart disease is NOT just a man’s disease More women die of cardiovascular disease than the next five causes of death combined, including cancer Cardiovascular disease causes almost 460,000 female deaths a year – and approximately one death per minute 43 million American women are living with cardiovascular disease 64% of women who die suddenly from coronary heart disease have no previous symptoms of the disease Cardiovascular disease is largely preventable Women are reluctant to call 911!

4 African Americans and CVD - Statistics

5 Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) Among non-Hispanic blacks age 20 and older, the following have CVD: ― 44.6 percent of men ― 46.9 percent of women In 2006, CVD caused the deaths of ― 47,956 black males ― 50,798 black females The 2006 overall death rate from CVD was Death rates for blacks were ― for males ― for females Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) Among non-Hispanic blacks age 20 and older, the following have CVD: ― 7.8 percent of men ― 8.8 percent of women (NHANES [ ], NCHS and NHLBI)

6 Signs of a Heart Attack Not the same as the hallmark signs for men Chest discomfort Discomfort in upper body Shortness of breath Cold sweat Nausea Lightheadedness “Flu-like” symptoms Back or jaw pain

7 What have we Learned? Heart disease can strike women at any age. Factors leading to heart disease originate in young women and develop over time. Lifestyle changes can prevent or at least postpone heart disease.

8 Am I at Risk? Uncontrollable Risk Factors Increasing Age Heredity (family history) Race (members of some races, particularly African Americans, are at higher risks) Controllable Risk Factors High Cholesterol High Blood Pressure Physical Inactivity Obesity and Overweight Type II Diabetes Smoking If you have any of these risk factors, you are at risk for heart disease

9 CVD in African American and Hispanic Women Nearly half (49%) of all non-Hispanic African-American females have some form of heart disease, stroke or other cardio- vascular disease (CVD). Nearly one-third (32.2%) of all deaths in Hispanic females are caused by diseases of the heart and stroke.

10 Your Risk: High Blood Cholesterol About 50% of women have a total cholesterol of 200 mg/dL and above, which puts them at risk for heart disease. Total Cholesterol Level Desirable = Less than 200 Borderline high = 200 to 239 High = 240 and above

11 Your Risk: High Blood Pressure About 39 million women age 20 and older have high blood pressure. 28% of people with high blood pressure don’t know they have it. Normal Blood Pressure Below 120/80 Pre-Hypertension /80-89 Hypertension Above 140/90

12 Go Red Heart CheckUp Inactive women: Black females – 52% Hispanic females – 54% Asian females – 41% White females – 38% All healthy adults ages should be getting at least 30 minutes of moderate intensity activity five days a week. Your Risk: Physical Inactivity

13 Your Risk: Obesity & Overweight About 69 million women are overweight and 36.7 million are obese, which greatly increases their risk for heart disease. Excess Weight: Strains your heart Raises blood pressure and cholesterol Can lead to diabetes

14 Your Risk: Diabetes People with diabetes are two to four times more likely to develop cardiovascular disease. 7.5 million women 20+ have been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, 2.3 million go undiagnosed and 24.9 million are pre-diabetic. Stroke, TIA Blindness Heart attack, angina Kidney disease High blood pressure Erectile dysfunction Loss of legs or feet Nerve disease Type 2 DiabetesComplications of Diabetes

15 Your Risk: Smoking Benefits of Quitting  Within 1 to 2 years of quitting, your risk of coronary heart disease is substantially reduced.  Your sense of smell and taste come back.  A smoker’s cough will go away.  You breathe much easier.  It is easier to be physically active.  You are free of “needing” cigarettes million women age 18 and older smoke, increasing their risk for heart disease.

16 African Americans and Stroke - Statistics

17 Stroke Among non-Hispanic blacks age 20 and older, the following have had a stroke: ― 3.8 percent of men ― 4.3 percent of women In 2006, stroke caused the deaths of ― 7,424 black males ― 9,621 black females The 2006 overall death rate from stroke was Death rates for blacks were ― 67.1 for males ― 57.0 for females (NHANES [ ], NCHS and NHLBI)

18 Take the Pledge Join the movement to prevent and overcome stroke. For yourself… For your loved ones… Call STROKE or visit powertoendstroke.org

19 On Power Sunday Learn about the increased risk for stroke and take steps to reduce it. Join your fellow church members… Power Sunday is

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21 What Can I Do To Prevent Heart Disease? Eat a healthy diet low in saturated fat, trans fat, cholesterol and sodium. Keep your weight under control. Be physically active at least 30 minutes on most or all days of the week. Control your blood pressure and cholesterol levels. Manage your blood sugar if you have diabetes. Get regular medical check-ups. Talk to your doctor about a prevention plan and medicines that may be right for you. Don’t smoke, and avoid tobacco smoke. Take ACTION to Lower Your Risk

22 Go Red Women Take Action! A woman who Goes Red… … takes action to reduce her risk of heart disease. … exercises more frequently. … has lost weight. … has had her cholesterol checked. … modifies her diet to include healthy food. … encourages others to join Go Red For Women. … has taken the Go Red Heart CheckUp. Join Go Red For Women at and get your free red dress pin.

23 Go Red Heart CheckUp Online tool to educate women about their heart health and encourage patient-physician dialogue

24 What else can I do? Sign up at GoRedForWomen.org Become a part of the Go Red Community Unite with over 800,000 women

25 Locally sponsored by…

26 26 National Wear Red Day – Local Activation 13,542 companies participated nationally Raising over $1 million! American Heart Association National Center Hawk Electronics University of Houston United States Alliance Mrs. Massachusetts at Bruins Game Memorial Hermann Hospital Houston Trinity Medical Center

27 Why did GCU sponsor? In line with its values-based approach and philosophy of service to the community, Grand Canyon University has agreed to a three-year sponsorship with the American Heart Association’s Go Red for Women campaign. The power of GCU's reach through its campus students, faculty and staff, as well as its online student population, will take the outreach well beyond the Valley's borders.

28 What is GCU doing? GCU students take the message to the streets: see the You Tube video!

29 GCU Nursing Students provide health screenings at valley events GCU campus goes Red What is GCU doing?

30 GCU students take the message to the streets: see the You Tube video! GCU Nursing Students provide health screenings at valley events GCU campus goes Red Hearts in the Arts competition – an art movement against heart disease Visit facebook.com/grandcanyonu to learn more about GCU’s stand against heart disease What is GCU doing?

31 GCU students take the message to the streets: see the You Tube video! GCU Nursing Students provide health screenings at valley events GCU campus goes Red Hearts in the Arts competition – an art movement against heart disease Visit facebook.com/grandcanyonu to learn more about GCU’s stand against heart disease Speakers Bureau gives the community the latest information What is GCU doing?

32 “The fight against heart disease is a perfect fit for Grand Canyon University’s vision to improve the health of our community through the efforts of our students and the Nursing and Health Sciences programs.” Fran Roberts, RN, PhD, Vice President Strategic Business Alliances College of Nursing and Health Sciences


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