Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Gender as a constraint to Research Capacity Building within Higher Education Institutions: Learning from institutional experiences in tackling this Consolata.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Gender as a constraint to Research Capacity Building within Higher Education Institutions: Learning from institutional experiences in tackling this Consolata."— Presentation transcript:

1 Gender as a constraint to Research Capacity Building within Higher Education Institutions: Learning from institutional experiences in tackling this Consolata Kabonesa The Irish-African Partnership for Research Capacity Building Meeting 12 th May 2009; Maputo, Mozambique

2 Outline Introduction Understanding gender Why gender in development and research? Gender as relevant to universities Management of universities, research, teaching and learning Experiences from partnership institutions Conclusion

3 Introduction Discourse on the status of women Gender discourse since 1980s Status of women –disadvantaged relative to men, –have less access to resources and benefits –Have less access to information and decision- making, –Have fewer rights both within the household and in the public sphere

4 Understanding Gender Gender – relational concept - difference between♀ and ♂ Socially constructed Changes over time and context specific Expectations - characteristics, aptitudes and likely behaviours of both ♀ and ♂

5 Understanding Gender Assigned economic, social, political and cultural roles –differences in needs and interests that should be addressed equally. Allocation and distribution of resources Gender is not women Sex – biological-male/female; hormones

6 Why Gender… Allows for understanding the status of ♀ and ♂ within a specific socio- cultural context Gender addresses social, economic, political constraints faced by ♀ and ♂ ♀ and ♂ would have different answers for similar questions regarding development

7 The Cycle - Gender Roles influence the Division of labour Labour is valued differently Based on who does what? Differentiated roles, work and valuing of work create Differential access to decision-making, services and benefits Differentiated valuing of work & access support Existing power relations, Reinforce gender roles

8 Why Gender… Holistic approach to development Address issues of vulnerability Interventions - improve the livelihoods Create equitable and sustainable development Leads to contented people ☺

9 Gender in Research Use gender to analyse –economic conditions, –government bureaucracies, –socio-cultural factors, –familial norms, –training/education & –religious beliefs, etc Gender issues in research require an understanding of and applying gender analysis

10 Gender in Research Assess differential –access to power, –resources, and opportunities, –division of labour, –social and gender relations at various levels of concern Applying gender from inception of the research through all steps of the research

11 Policy Implications Identify beneficiary Identify areas of focus Design and implement gender responsive of policy Develop intervention strategies Lead to sustainable projects Reduce inequalities in society

12 Gender in Higher Education Institutions Historical imbalances -Socialization, culture, lack of role models, lack of policies

13 Gender in Higher Education Institutions ‘Namuddu (1995) …higher education institutions and especially African universities have a critical role to play in the social and economic transformation of African societies. …for HE institutions to play this role effectively, they must provide a model of excellence to the rest of society as regards gender equity by embracing the principle of gender equity in their make up and in their practices. Increased women's participation in HE is particularly important in the era of globalization that we live in’. cited in Bunyi, Grace W. (2004) Gender disparities in higher education in kenya : nature, extent and the way forward. The African Symposium Vol. 4 No. 1 March 2004

14 Gender in institutions of higher education HE enables women to participate in the social, political and economic lives of their communities and countries as leaders in business, in the professions and in politics – (Bunyi, 2004)

15 Representation of Women at Makerere University Senior Administrative (1-7): 76 ; 42% Assistant Lecturers 46; 29% Teaching Assistants 36; 29% Lecturer level: 115; 19% Senior Lecturer 35; 10% Associate Professor 6; 3% Professor: 3; 6% Kabonesa, Dranzoa, Kanabahita (2009) Makerere gender terrain and national development. Stakeholders consultative conference (26 to 27 march 2009) –Insert graghs

16 Representation of Women in UL (2005 - 2007) Grades 7-9: 51% to 63% Lecturer level: 31% to 40% Senior Lecturer, Associate Professor, Professor: 8% to 17% Female academics: –6 Professors –4 Associate Professors –27 Senior Lecturers –Richardson, Ita

17 Results –why these statistics No substantial gender biases at UL through overt institutional generation. Females more involved with teaching and caring for students at their detriment for research opportunities. Females spend less time on research and write fewer grant proposals, papers etc Male / Females spend comparable time on administration (female slightly higher) Females have fewer appointments to national / international bodies

18 Results No substantial gender biases at UL through overt institutional generation. Females more involved with teaching and caring for students at their detriment for research opportunities. Females spend less time on research and write fewer grant proposals, papers etc Male / Females spend comparable time on administration (female slightly higher) Females have fewer appointments to national / international bodies

19 Group work -- Gender issues in your university Is your university different from Makerere and Limerick? Is data available on the status of women and gender issues in your university? Are you aware of, informed about, and sensitive to gender issues? What is the level of gender awareness in your institution? What are the gender issues in access, inclusion, promotion, and the general climate? Do you think that a gender policy is needed in your university?

20 Group work How would you characterise research outputs by male and female academic staff at your institution? Are men and women equally involved in research activities? Who sits on research committees? Does it matter if women are incuded on research committees?

21 Gender and Capacity Cont. Are there specific contraints that women face? What strategies do you have at your institution that ensures inclusion of women in research? How are your staff motivated to conduct research that is gender responsive? How have you integrated gender in research programmes?

22 Conclusion Gender is not women However women can be targeted to address historical imbalances Gender brings out the views of both women and men (young and old) Gives the vulnerable and disadvantaged a voice Holistic approach to research

23 Conclusion Gender not well understood in academia and research Not easy to conduct gender focused research Opportunities in funding/donor interest Need for integrating gender in all research

24 Recommendations Promote gender focused, women and men specific research for sustainable development Promote young scholars’ research activities Promote collaboration with gender specialists Promote collaboration with NGOs Create awareness about importance of gender in research

25 Source Parker A. Rani, Itiziar Lozano and Lyn A. Messner (1995) Gender Relation Analysis: A guide to Trainers. CT, Westport: Save the Children


Download ppt "Gender as a constraint to Research Capacity Building within Higher Education Institutions: Learning from institutional experiences in tackling this Consolata."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google