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GCSE MODERN WORLD HISTORY GCSE MODERN WORLD HISTORY BRITAIN 1900-1918 INTERACTIVE BRITAIN 1900-1918 INTERACTIVE How far did British society change between.

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Presentation on theme: "GCSE MODERN WORLD HISTORY GCSE MODERN WORLD HISTORY BRITAIN 1900-1918 INTERACTIVE BRITAIN 1900-1918 INTERACTIVE How far did British society change between."— Presentation transcript:

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2 GCSE MODERN WORLD HISTORY GCSE MODERN WORLD HISTORY BRITAIN INTERACTIVE BRITAIN INTERACTIVE How far did British society change between 1900 and 1918?

3 History Interactive Key Stage 4 History BRITAIN INTERACTIVE These are sample slides. There is no audio, document links or internet links. History Interactive©

4 Britain in 1900 When Queen Victoria died in 1901, Britain had an empire that covered 20 per cent of the world's land surface. Before 1900, Britain was the most powerful country in the world. However, Germany, Japan and the USA were rapidly becoming serious economic rivals. These countries put more money into modernising their factories and were quick to develop new industries such as chemicals and electrical goods.Queen Victoria The Victorians had achieved many things though. Hours of work had been steadily reduced and working conditions improved. Many of the slum houses were cleared away and most houses had piped water and toilets. All children had to go to school. All male householders had the right to vote. However, the Victorians had left many problems unsolved; perhaps the most important one being the problem of poverty. Britain in 1900 When Queen Victoria died in 1901, Britain had an empire that covered 20 per cent of the world's land surface. Before 1900, Britain was the most powerful country in the world. However, Germany, Japan and the USA were rapidly becoming serious economic rivals. These countries put more money into modernising their factories and were quick to develop new industries such as chemicals and electrical goods.Queen Victoria The Victorians had achieved many things though. Hours of work had been steadily reduced and working conditions improved. Many of the slum houses were cleared away and most houses had piped water and toilets. All children had to go to school. All male householders had the right to vote. However, the Victorians had left many problems unsolved; perhaps the most important one being the problem of poverty. Learning Outcomes By the end of this section you will learn what problems poor people faced and why so little had been done to support them. You will understand the reasons why the Liberal Reforms changed this, who they helped and how successful these welfare reforms were. In what ways did opposition to the Liberal Reforms limit their impact?welfare Read the learning outcomes first. 3 3 King Edward VII, eldest son of Queen Victoria and his wife Alexandra of Denmark. Edward died in 1910 after a series of heart attacks. GCSE Modern History Britain

5 10 The Old Age Pensions Act 1908 This gave a weekly pension from government funds to the elderly. From January 1909 almost everyone over the age of 70 was eligible for a state pension. Old people no longer depended on the Poor Law or Charity. 650,000 old people claimed their pension in the first year. A single person got 5 shillings a week, a couple got 7 shillings 6d. A couple got significantly less than two single pensioners. Many old people never reached the age of 70 so could not benefit from the pension. Reform Evaluation Help for old people GCSE Modern History Britain Old people and the Liberal Welfare Reforms What did the Liberal Government do to help old people?

6 HISTORIANS’ VIEWS We should beware of … claims that the Liberal Party created the Welfare State between 1906 and 1914” E J Evans, Social Policy “In fact, it would be true to say that most of the developments that we now think of as part of the Welfare State are built on the foundations laid during this exciting time, ”. G Williams, The Coming of the Welfare State “There were many participants in the creation of the Liberal Reforms who had no thought of creating a “welfare state” of the type which developed in Britain after Indeed many Liberals of would have been appalled by the prospect” J R Hay, The Origins of the Liberal Welfare Reforms SOURCE ASOURCE CSOURCE B Listen to source 1 Listen to source 2 Listen to source 3 15 GCSE Modern History Britain Overall Assessment Did the Liberal Reforms create a Welfare State? A welfare state is one that looks after peoples’ needs from ‘the cradle to the grave’. Had the Liberals achieved this by 1918?

7 The position of women in 1900 For centuries women worked in the home at childcare, cooking, washing, cleaning, nursing, gardening and farming. In 1850, women were thought of as second class citizens. People believed women were inferior to men – physically and mentally. Women were paid less than men, and tended to do less skilled work. They were excluded from many professions and it was thought that ‘a woman’s place is in the home’. Many young women were simply expected to get married and have children. Towards the end of the nineteenth century, new opportunities began to open up for working women. Some women could begin to train for the medical and teaching professions or join the civil service. However, employers insisted that women gave up these jobs as soon as they were married. There were some legal changes to the status of women that slowly began to redress the inequality that women faced in society. By 1900, most working men could vote in general elections if they had a permanent address, women could not. Women could vote in local elections however. This was because local councils dealt with local matters which were likely to affect their homes. Most people thought that only men should deal with national politics. Up to 1914 women organised a sometimes violent campaign to change this.general elections The position of women in 1900 For centuries women worked in the home at childcare, cooking, washing, cleaning, nursing, gardening and farming. In 1850, women were thought of as second class citizens. People believed women were inferior to men – physically and mentally. Women were paid less than men, and tended to do less skilled work. They were excluded from many professions and it was thought that ‘a woman’s place is in the home’. Many young women were simply expected to get married and have children. Towards the end of the nineteenth century, new opportunities began to open up for working women. Some women could begin to train for the medical and teaching professions or join the civil service. However, employers insisted that women gave up these jobs as soon as they were married. There were some legal changes to the status of women that slowly began to redress the inequality that women faced in society. By 1900, most working men could vote in general elections if they had a permanent address, women could not. Women could vote in local elections however. This was because local councils dealt with local matters which were likely to affect their homes. Most people thought that only men should deal with national politics. Up to 1914 women organised a sometimes violent campaign to change this.general elections Read the learning outcomes first. 17 Learning Outcomes By the end of this section you will know what role women where expected to play in society. You will learn why and how the suffrage campaign tried to change this and why their success was limited by You will also understand why women’s role in the First World helped to secure the vote in 1918? To what extent had men’s attitude towards the role of women changed?suffrage GCSE Modern History Britain


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