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Women’s Equality Day August 26 “Celebrating Women’s Right to Vote” U.S. Customs & Border Protection Office of Diversity and Civil Rights.

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Presentation on theme: "Women’s Equality Day August 26 “Celebrating Women’s Right to Vote” U.S. Customs & Border Protection Office of Diversity and Civil Rights."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Women’s Equality Day August 26 “Celebrating Women’s Right to Vote” U.S. Customs & Border Protection Office of Diversity and Civil Rights

3 Women’s Equality Day At U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), we believe that our diversity is our strength. The Office of Diversity and Civil Rights is committed to providing high quality diversity and cultural awareness activities and educational information to CBP employees because we believe that through cultural understanding we grow stronger as an organization. We are committed to the equal representation and participation of all CBP employees in the full privileges and benefits of employment. This presentation is designed to provide you with a brief overview of the courageous suffragists and their supporters who through painstaking struggle and hard work made it possible for women to vote and to hold elected office. We hope you find it interesting and informative.

4 What is Women’s Equality Day? Women’s Equality Day was instituted by Representative Bella Abzug (D-NY) and was established in The date, August 26 commemorates the passage of the 19 th Amendment and the Woman Suffrage Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which gave U.S. women full voting rights in 1920.

5 Women’s Rights Movement Timeline  1848: The first women’s rights convention is held in Seneca Falls, New York. After two days of discussion and debate, the Declaration of Sentiments is signed.  1869: Susan B. Anthony & Elizabeth Cady Stanton form the National Women’s Suffrage Association (NWSA).  1869: Lucy Stone, Henry Blackwell, and others form the American Women’s Suffrage Association (AWSA).  1890: The National Women’s Suffrage Association (NWSA) and the American Women’s Suffrage Association (AWSA) merge to form the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA). As the movement’s mainstream organization, the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA) wages state-by-state campaigns to obtain voting rights for women.  1903: The National Women’s Trade Union League (WTUL) is established to advocate for improved wages and working conditions for women.  1913: Alice Paul and Lucy Burns form the Congressional Union to work towards the passage of a federal amendment to give women the right to vote. The group is later renamed the National Women’s Party.  1919: The federal woman suffrage amendment, originally written by Susan B. Anthony was introduced to Congress in It was passed by the House of Representatives and the Senate and then sent to the states for ratification.  1920: The 19th Amendment was added to the Constitution, granting women the right to vote, is signed into law.

6 Elizabeth Cady Stanton ( ) Elizabeth Stanton was the co- founder with Lucretia Mott of the 1848 Women's Rights Convention that was held in Seneca Falls, New York. Stanton and Susan B. Anthony founded the National Woman Suffrage Association. Stanton served as its president for more than 20 years.

7 Women’s Rights Convention of 1848 At the Women’s Rights Convention, over 100 attendees signed the Declaration of Sentiments. This document called for the attainment of civil, social, political, and religious rights of women. The Declaration is one of the roots of the suffrage movement that ultimately resulted with the 19th Amendment being added to the Constitution.

8 The Backlash This was the period in which editors wrote negative articles regarding the women’s call for expanded rights. The articles essentially had a positive impact far beyond anything the organizers could have hoped for. From the backlash, the Women’s Equality Movement began along with numerous organizations to aid in the struggle for equality.

9 Susan B. Anthony ( ) Susan B. Anthony was a 70 year veteran in the fight for women's rights. Anthony lectured widely in the United States and Europe and wrote a three-volume history of the suffrage movement.

10 National Woman Suffrage Association The National Woman Suffrage Association (NWSA) was formed by Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton in The object of the National Woman Suffrage Association are as follows: 1.Secure an amendment to the Constitution in favor of women’s suffrage 2.Work for suffrage on the federal level. 3. Press for more extensive institutional changes.

11 Lucy Stone ( ) Lucy Stone was the first woman from Massachusetts to earn a college degree. She established the “The Women’s Journal” and was co- founder of the American Women’s Suffrage Association.

12 American Women’s Suffrage Association In 1869, the American Women’s Suffrage Association (AWSA) was formed by Lucy Stone, Julia Ward Howe, and Henry Blackwell. In 1890, the American Women’s Suffrage Association and the National Woman Suffrage Association merged to form the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA)

13 Men of the Cause At the Seneca Falls Convention in 1848, 32 men signed the Declaration of Sentiments including: Fredrick Douglass and James Mott. On August 18,1920, Congressman Harry Burns cast the final vote in Tennessee that was needed to ratify the 19th Amendment, granting women the right to vote.

14 Alice Paul ( ) Alice Paul helped found the Congressional Union for Woman Suffrage, which later became known as the National Woman's Party. Alice Paul worked for passage of an equal rights amendment after the 19 th amendment passed. Paul successfully lobbied for wording on gender equality to be included in the preamble to the United Nations Charter and in the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

15 Lucy Burns ( ) Lucy Burns began picketing in Washington D.C. in 1916 and helped form the National Woman’s Party (NWP). As a member of the National Woman’s Party (NWP) she organized campaigns and was editor of the ”The Suffragist.” Lucy Burns was arrested six times, and spent more time in jail than any other suffragist.

16 Silent Sentinels The National Women’s Party organized the "Silent Sentinels," which was comprised of suffragists standing outside the White House holding banners inscribed with incendiary phrases directed towards President Wilson. Despite the danger of bodily harm from frequent mob attacks and imprisonment, the suffragists continued their demonstrations for freedom unabated. While imprisoned, the suffragists staged hunger strikes in order for their demand of being treated like political prisoners be recognized.

17 When the news of the prison conditions and hunger strikes became known, the press, politicians, and the public began demanding the women’s release; sympathy for the prisoners brought many to support the cause of women's suffrage. Silent Sentinels (contd.)

18 Perseverance Perseverance on the part of National American Woman Suffrage, National Woman’s Party, and thousands of women who continuously fought for their beliefs eventually led to victory and on August 26,1920, the 19 th Amendment granted the ballot to American women.

19 Sources Slide 3: & day Slide 4: Slide 5: Slide 6: Slide 7: Slide 8: & Slide 9: & Slide 10: Slide 11: & Slide 12: & Slide 13: Slide 14: & Slide 15: Slide 16:

20 This presentation was prepared by the Office of Diversity and Civil Rights as part of the continuing series of Special Emphasis Program Presentations. Thank You For Viewing


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