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Students will be able to define and find examples of ethos, pathos and logos and comment on their effect on an audience Learning Goal:

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Presentation on theme: "Students will be able to define and find examples of ethos, pathos and logos and comment on their effect on an audience Learning Goal:"— Presentation transcript:

1 Students will be able to define and find examples of ethos, pathos and logos and comment on their effect on an audience Learning Goal:

2 Rhetoric the art of using language to persuade

3 Aristotle

4 Three modes of persuasion.

5 1. Ethos 2. Pathos 3. Logos

6 1. Ethos someone’s character, credibility, or identity

7 -Applying to NHS, colleges - Defend yourself to a teacher - The way you dress, present, identify yourself How you establish Ethos

8 A writer/speaker is establishing their Ethos when they… - list their credentials - talk about their experiences - talk about their behavior

9 Two types of Ethos- we’ll call them explicit and implicit * Explicit= Ethos that the writer or speaker verbally tells you of. * Implicit= Ethos that the writer or speaker does not directly talk about.

10 Writers/Speakers can also appeal to the ethos of their audience… …they can appeal to their sense of identity “Americans do not tolerate injustice” “Don’t be the type of person who allows this to happen…” ….they can assert a shared ethos “We’re all in this together as Americans”

11 Let’s look for examples of Ethos in I’ve Been to the Mountain Top A Bit of Background Info: …Martin Luther King delivers this speech in Memphis, Tennessee, the day before he was assassinated.

12 Let’s look for examples of Ethos in I’ve Been to the Mountain Top As we read, let’s highlight (or underline) lines in which King establishes his ethos or appeals to his audience’s ethos

13 Let’s look for examples of Ethos in I’ve Been to the Mountain Top As we read, let’s highlight (or underline) lines in which King establishes his ethos or appeals to his audience’s ethos This is important: write what effect the lines have on King’s audience. Remember our goal: Students will be able to define and find examples of ethos, pathos and logos and comment on their effect on an audience

14 2. Pathos appealing to emotions

15 -Depict consequences “Fine, don’t let me go out. I’m just going to miss out on the best years of my life.” - Puppy-Dog face - Guilt How you’re familiar with Pathos

16 A writer/speaker is drawing on pathos when they… -paint an emotionally charged image -use ‘emotive’ words - imply that you should feel a certain way

17 How does the word Pathos relate to the word pathetic?

18 Something that is ‘pathetic’ in the specific sense, is sad, it stirs pity… More generally, the word ‘pathetic’, as in a ‘pathetic appeal’ means to appeal to emotions- be they sad, happy, angry, etc.

19 Therefore, while this is ‘pathetic’ in the sad sense:

20 …This could be is ‘pathetic’ in the sense that it draws on your happier emotions: [Get ready for it]

21 …This could be is ‘pathetic’ in the sense that it draws on your happier emotions: [Get ready for it]

22 Again, the word ‘pathetic’, as in a ‘pathetic appeal’ means an appeal to one’s emotions- sadness, pity, anger, joy, any emotion

23 Let’s look for pathos in FDR’s Declaration of War For some background information: FDR made this speech after the bombing of Pearl Harbor in It announced America’s entrance into World War II.

24 Let’s listen first: Y

25 Let’s look for pathos in FDR’s Declaration of War Let’s go back and highlight (or underline) lines in which Roosevelt appeals to his audience’s emotions This is important: write what effect the lines have on Roosevelt’s audience. Remember our goal: Students will be able to define and find examples of ethos, pathos and logos and comment on their effect on an audience

26 3. Logos appealing to logic

27 -Inquiring “how come?” “why?” (You’re prying into the logic of your counter argument) - If… then… statements are attempts to make a logical argument -If you’ve ever used statistics in your writing -Using concessions -Even using anecdotes to back up your points How you’re familiar with Logos

28 A writer/speaker is drawing on logos, or logic, when they… -use examples of past experiences - use numbers or statistics - cite authoritative research

29 Let’s look for logos in ‘A Time for Choosing’ As we read, let’s highlight (or underline) lines in which the speaker, Ronald Reagan, uses logic to persuade his audience This is important: write what effect the lines have on the author’s audience. Remember our goal: Students will be able to define and find examples of ethos, pathos and logos and comment on their effect on an audience

30 Let’s look for logos in ‘A Time for Choosing’ For some background information: Ronald Reagan is giving this speech to endorse 1964 Republican Presidential Nominee Barry Goldwater. Reagan had been a Democrat for most of his life, but in this speech he outlines his reasons for voting Republican- namely the desire to see taxes lowered

31 Now Let’s take a minute to review our exit slip and mark our scales


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