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5 - m i n u t e S t r a t e g i c T r a i n i n g f o r E m e r g e n c y P r e p a r e d n e s s COPYRIGHT 2005 Authorization to Copy: No Part of this.

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Presentation on theme: "5 - m i n u t e S t r a t e g i c T r a i n i n g f o r E m e r g e n c y P r e p a r e d n e s s COPYRIGHT 2005 Authorization to Copy: No Part of this."— Presentation transcript:

1 5 - m i n u t e S t r a t e g i c T r a i n i n g f o r E m e r g e n c y P r e p a r e d n e s s COPYRIGHT 2005 Authorization to Copy: No Part of this publications may be reproduced, stored in retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, photocopying, or otherwise, without permission in writing from the copyright holder, the Center for Public Health Preparedness and Research. All rights reserved. Emergency Communication: Making the Initial Statement to the Media 5 - m i n u t e S t r a t e g i c T r a i n i n g f o r E m e r g e n c y P r e p a r e d n e s s Incident Command System & Public Health S.Y.S.T.E.M.S. Training

2 5 - m i n u t e S t r a t e g i c T r a i n i n g f o r E m e r g e n c y P r e p a r e d n e s s COPYRIGHT 2005 Authorization to Copy: No Part of this publications may be reproduced, stored in retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, photocopying, or otherwise, without permission in writing from the copyright holder, the Center for Public Health Preparedness and Research. All rights reserved. MAIN MENU Goal and Learning Objectives Questions Course Assessment 5-Minute Training: S.Y.S.T.E.M.S.

3 5 - m i n u t e S t r a t e g i c T r a i n i n g f o r E m e r g e n c y P r e p a r e d n e s s COPYRIGHT 2005 Authorization to Copy: No Part of this publications may be reproduced, stored in retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, photocopying, or otherwise, without permission in writing from the copyright holder, the Center for Public Health Preparedness and Research. All rights reserved. QUESTIONS If you have any questions or comments, please contact: Randall L. Hecht, CEMSean G. Kaufman, MPH, CHES

4 5 - m i n u t e S t r a t e g i c T r a i n i n g f o r E m e r g e n c y P r e p a r e d n e s s COPYRIGHT 2005 Authorization to Copy: No Part of this publications may be reproduced, stored in retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, photocopying, or otherwise, without permission in writing from the copyright holder, the Center for Public Health Preparedness and Research. All rights reserved. GOAL AND LEARNING OBJECTIVES Goal: The goal of the training is to provide public health professionals with information addressing 7 key aspects of the Incident Command System (ICS). Learning Objectives: 1. List the seven components of the ICS S.Y.S.T.E.M.S. training. 2. Utilize training information to develop public health emergency response plans that include the basic ICS S.Y.S.T.E.M.S. components.

5 5 - m i n u t e S t r a t e g i c T r a i n i n g f o r E m e r g e n c y P r e p a r e d n e s s COPYRIGHT 2005 Authorization to Copy: No Part of this publications may be reproduced, stored in retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, photocopying, or otherwise, without permission in writing from the copyright holder, the Center for Public Health Preparedness and Research. All rights reserved. PREPAREDNESS TRAINING Incident Command System and Public Health: S.Y.S.T.E.M.S. Training Sean G. Kaufman, MPH, CHES Director of Programs Center for Public Health Preparedness and Research Rollins School of Public Health Emory University Randall L. Hecht, CEM Safety Engineer Office of Health and Safety Office of the Director Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

6 5 - m i n u t e S t r a t e g i c T r a i n i n g f o r E m e r g e n c y P r e p a r e d n e s s COPYRIGHT 2005 Authorization to Copy: No Part of this publications may be reproduced, stored in retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, photocopying, or otherwise, without permission in writing from the copyright holder, the Center for Public Health Preparedness and Research. All rights reserved. Introduction Public health professionals have been responding to emergencies for decades, never relying on ICS to manage or integrate resources for outside organizations. After September 11, a new level of awareness was born. This awareness lead to the identification of threats that will affect multiple levels within a community. Public health has enormous role in emergency response, however so do many other organizations. ICS is the model used to integrate these organizations and efforts to serve communities who are experiencing the effects of an emergency situation. The ICS SYSTEMS training has been developed to assist public health professionals with identifying their roles within the ICS model. It is important with the threats we face today that multiple agencies work together to prepare for, respond to, recover from, and mitigate the impact of emergency situations.

7 5 - m i n u t e S t r a t e g i c T r a i n i n g f o r E m e r g e n c y P r e p a r e d n e s s COPYRIGHT 2005 Authorization to Copy: No Part of this publications may be reproduced, stored in retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, photocopying, or otherwise, without permission in writing from the copyright holder, the Center for Public Health Preparedness and Research. All rights reserved. (S) Y S T E M S : Span of Control During an emergency, there is lots of pressure and several activities needing immediate attention. In order to manage staff at an optimal level, there should be limits for the number of staff being managed (5-7) per team. To limit the amount of information and activities that leaders have to manage, the following example demonstrates an effective span of control – spreading management responsibilities to several leaders across multiple disciplines. Incident Commander Section Chiefs Responders

8 5 - m i n u t e S t r a t e g i c T r a i n i n g f o r E m e r g e n c y P r e p a r e d n e s s COPYRIGHT 2005 Authorization to Copy: No Part of this publications may be reproduced, stored in retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, photocopying, or otherwise, without permission in writing from the copyright holder, the Center for Public Health Preparedness and Research. All rights reserved. S (Y) S T E M S : Your Role You wouldn’t want a fire fighter to manage an epidemiologic response and a we wouldn’t want a laboratorian telling the fire fighter how to fight a fire. Know your role within the field of public health and be ready to communicate why you need to be involved and what you contribute to minimize the effects of the situation on people. It will be greatly appreciated by the incident leadership if you: - Communicate how your involvement benefits response efforts. - Communicate what you are doing and what you need to do it. - Communicate what you can do to help mitigate the situation. For example, an epidemiologist can provide valuable information on whether or not actions taken to mitigate a situation are working.

9 5 - m i n u t e S t r a t e g i c T r a i n i n g f o r E m e r g e n c y P r e p a r e d n e s s COPYRIGHT 2005 Authorization to Copy: No Part of this publications may be reproduced, stored in retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, photocopying, or otherwise, without permission in writing from the copyright holder, the Center for Public Health Preparedness and Research. All rights reserved. S Y (S T) E M S : Strategic vs. Tactical Response During an emergency, there should one leader and several managers. The leader is concerned with strategic planning and the managers are concerned with tactical response. In other words, the Incident Commander (leader) is interested in activities that will return a community to a level of normalcy as quick as possible. The Section Chiefs (managers) are interested in activities that mitigate (minimize) the effects of an emergency on a community. Responders (team members) do the work. STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP (INCIDENT COMMANDER) ESTABLISHES PRIORITIES AND STATES WHAT NEEDS TO BE DONE. TACTICAL LEADERSHIP (SECTION CHIEFS) CARRIES IT OUT AND PROVIDES CONTINUED RECOMMENDATIONS AND UPDATES TO THE INCIDENT COMMANDER.

10 5 - m i n u t e S t r a t e g i c T r a i n i n g f o r E m e r g e n c y P r e p a r e d n e s s COPYRIGHT 2005 Authorization to Copy: No Part of this publications may be reproduced, stored in retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, photocopying, or otherwise, without permission in writing from the copyright holder, the Center for Public Health Preparedness and Research. All rights reserved. S Y (S T) E M S : Strategic vs. Tactical Incident Commander Section Chiefs and Responders STRATEGIC TACTICAL Event Community Incident Command Post

11 5 - m i n u t e S t r a t e g i c T r a i n i n g f o r E m e r g e n c y P r e p a r e d n e s s COPYRIGHT 2005 Authorization to Copy: No Part of this publications may be reproduced, stored in retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, photocopying, or otherwise, without permission in writing from the copyright holder, the Center for Public Health Preparedness and Research. All rights reserved. S Y S T (E) M S : Emergency Definition Public Health and traditional First Responders (fire, EMS, Police, Emergency Departments) have different definitions for emergencies. A fire may be an emergency, however unless it is widespread and continues to pose a serious threat to the health of the public, it may not be defined as an emergency for public health. While there are different types of emergencies, for communities, states, and nations an emergency is something that occurs suddenly and usually without notice causing injury, death, destruction, cessation of normal activity, or any combination. AN EMERGENCY IS AN EVENT THAT OCCURS UNEXPECTEDLY, PUTTING A GREAT STRAIN ON CURRENT LIFE-SAVING AND LIFE- SUSTAINING CAPACITIES WITHIN A COMMUNITY.

12 5 - m i n u t e S t r a t e g i c T r a i n i n g f o r E m e r g e n c y P r e p a r e d n e s s COPYRIGHT 2005 Authorization to Copy: No Part of this publications may be reproduced, stored in retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, photocopying, or otherwise, without permission in writing from the copyright holder, the Center for Public Health Preparedness and Research. All rights reserved. S Y S T E (M) S : Members of Sections Section Chiefs Responders OperationsPlanningLogisticsFinanceGeneral Staff Click on the section titles for a short description.

13 5 - m i n u t e S t r a t e g i c T r a i n i n g f o r E m e r g e n c y P r e p a r e d n e s s COPYRIGHT 2005 Authorization to Copy: No Part of this publications may be reproduced, stored in retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, photocopying, or otherwise, without permission in writing from the copyright holder, the Center for Public Health Preparedness and Research. All rights reserved. S Y S T E (M) S : Members of Sections- Operations Responders Operations The Operations Section is responsible for the responders who are involved in tactical operations. For example, firefighters fighting the fire, EMS responding to an emergency, the triage, treating, and transport of survivors, security around the site, investigation, traffic control and other tactical operations as needed. Public Health activities would include: surveillance, risk assessments, educational assessment, rapid needs assessment, data gathering, health education programs, risk communication, mental health issues, and prophylactic treatment programs. THESE ARE THE PEOPLE WHO REPORT THE SITUATION AND IMPLEMENT THE ACTIVITIES!

14 5 - m i n u t e S t r a t e g i c T r a i n i n g f o r E m e r g e n c y P r e p a r e d n e s s COPYRIGHT 2005 Authorization to Copy: No Part of this publications may be reproduced, stored in retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, photocopying, or otherwise, without permission in writing from the copyright holder, the Center for Public Health Preparedness and Research. All rights reserved. S Y S T E (M) S : Members of Sections- Planning Responders The Planning Section is responsible for gathering information, analyzing the information, and developing a plan (incident action plan) that would be implemented by the responders. Public Health activities would include: epidemiologic analysis; results of risk, needs, and educational assessments; discussions of immediate community, education, and mental needs; planning for necessary resources to accomplish short-term activities and increased capacity for sustainability of long-term activities. THESE ARE THE PEOPLE WHO STATE WHAT NEEDS TO BE DONE! Planning

15 5 - m i n u t e S t r a t e g i c T r a i n i n g f o r E m e r g e n c y P r e p a r e d n e s s COPYRIGHT 2005 Authorization to Copy: No Part of this publications may be reproduced, stored in retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, photocopying, or otherwise, without permission in writing from the copyright holder, the Center for Public Health Preparedness and Research. All rights reserved. S Y S T E (M) S : Members of Sections- Logistics Responders The Logistics Section is responsible for gathering and managing supplies, personnel, equipment, and building space needed during an emergency response. Public Health activities would include: identifying specific requirements and needs to accomplish activities that were discovered by the public health representatives in the Operations Section and to accomplished the activities identified by public health leaders in the Planning Section. THESE ARE THE PEOPLE WHO GET YOU WHAT YOU NEED TO DO THE JOB! Logistics

16 5 - m i n u t e S t r a t e g i c T r a i n i n g f o r E m e r g e n c y P r e p a r e d n e s s COPYRIGHT 2005 Authorization to Copy: No Part of this publications may be reproduced, stored in retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, photocopying, or otherwise, without permission in writing from the copyright holder, the Center for Public Health Preparedness and Research. All rights reserved. S Y S T E (M) S : Members of Sections- Finance Responders The Finance Section is responsible for contracting, accounts receivable and payable, and are also responsible for administrative activities (i.e., report writing, personnel issues). Public Health activities would include: identifying the cost of materials, supplies, personnel, transportation, housing, and expenses needed to accomplish public health activities identified by public health leaders in the Planning Section. THESE ARE THE PEOPLE WHO PAY FOR IT! Finance

17 5 - m i n u t e S t r a t e g i c T r a i n i n g f o r E m e r g e n c y P r e p a r e d n e s s COPYRIGHT 2005 Authorization to Copy: No Part of this publications may be reproduced, stored in retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, photocopying, or otherwise, without permission in writing from the copyright holder, the Center for Public Health Preparedness and Research. All rights reserved. S Y S T E (M) S : Members of Sections- General Staff Responders The General Staff consists of the safety office, public affairs specialist, and liaison officers from outside organizations. This group is responsible for the health, safety, and security of the response force and emergency site; the distribution of public information and management of political affairs; the administration of outside agency resources and integration of those resources into the response. Public Health activities would include: providing public health expertise to each of these staff members, ensuring public health concerns are addressed across public, political, and organization levels. General Staff

18 5 - m i n u t e S t r a t e g i c T r a i n i n g f o r E m e r g e n c y P r e p a r e d n e s s COPYRIGHT 2005 Authorization to Copy: No Part of this publications may be reproduced, stored in retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, photocopying, or otherwise, without permission in writing from the copyright holder, the Center for Public Health Preparedness and Research. All rights reserved. S Y S T E M (S) : Stages of an Emergency Preparedness Activities that include the planning, training, educating, and exercising of the entire response force (traditional first responders, public health, and the general public) for potential emergencies. Response Activities that occur during an emergency that save lives, reduce damage, and minimize the impact of an emergency on the community. Recovery Activities that occur after an emergency that bring the community back to a sense of normalcy or back to the pre-emergency state (economically, socially, and structurally). Mitigation Activities that include taking lessons learned during the emergency and making the community more resistant and resilient for potential emergencies.

19 5 - m i n u t e S t r a t e g i c T r a i n i n g f o r E m e r g e n c y P r e p a r e d n e s s COPYRIGHT 2005 Authorization to Copy: No Part of this publications may be reproduced, stored in retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, photocopying, or otherwise, without permission in writing from the copyright holder, the Center for Public Health Preparedness and Research. All rights reserved. SUMMARY The seven components of ICS SYSTEMS training are: (S) Span of Control: How many you can manage in an emergency. (Y) Your Role: Know your role in an emergency. (S) Strategic: Activities that return a community to a level of normalcy. (T) Tactical: Activities that minimize an emergency on a community. (E) Emergency: Know when capacities have been exceeded. (M) Members: Know the members for the 5 key sections. (S) Stages: Know the four stages of an emergency. Course Assessment

20 5 - m i n u t e S t r a t e g i c T r a i n i n g f o r E m e r g e n c y P r e p a r e d n e s s COPYRIGHT 2005 Authorization to Copy: No Part of this publications may be reproduced, stored in retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, photocopying, or otherwise, without permission in writing from the copyright holder, the Center for Public Health Preparedness and Research. All rights reserved. COURSE ASSESSMENT After submitting the course assessment, we will send an with a receipt listing the participant’s score. If you have any questions, please contact Sean Kaufman at or Thank you! Course Assessment


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