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Skills for Routines Breakout Sessions Breakout session 2: Setting the agenda and running the routine meeting.

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Presentation on theme: "Skills for Routines Breakout Sessions Breakout session 2: Setting the agenda and running the routine meeting."— Presentation transcript:

1 Skills for Routines Breakout Sessions Breakout session 2: Setting the agenda and running the routine meeting

2 1 ©2014 U.S. Education Delivery Institute Our objectives for this session ▪ Understand best practices and approach for setting an agenda for a routine ▪ Practice preparing an agenda for a routine ▪ Understand ideal roles and responsibilities while running a routine meeting

3 2 ©2014 U.S. Education Delivery Institute After the calibration, the next step is developing the agenda for the routine Purpose of developing an agenda: ▪ Clarify what you hope to achieve at the stocktake ▪ Identify the most important things on which to focus ▪ Scope out how to spend the time so you’re sure to get through everything

4 3 ©2014 U.S. Education Delivery Institute Routines should follow a T-shaped agenda with three common objectives Arrive at a shared view of progress Dive deep on specific issues Identify and commit to clear next steps

5 4 ©2014 U.S. Education Delivery Institute The “specific issues” objective, however, should be targeted for each routine based on the challenges surfaced in the self-assessment and calibration Challenges Next steps we can take and inform the chief about Usually “understand” objectives Specific asks of the chief Usually “agree” objectives Areas for deeper discussion at the stocktake Usually “discuss,” “decide,” or “identify” objectives

6 5 ©2014 U.S. Education Delivery Institute Finally, identify any supporting materials or data that will help drive the conversation Supporting materials to consider: ▪ What data analyses will support the points you are trying to make? ▪ What key facts or points will best support the points you are trying to make? ▪ What discussion questions will you need to tee up to get to the decisions you need?

7 6 ©2014 U.S. Education Delivery Institute Exercise: Preparing an agenda for a routine WhatHowTime ▪ Review sample output of self- assessment and calibration session and identify what are the challenges on which you’d focus the majority of your routine discussion ▪ For each, classify it as – Something you can develop next steps to act upon – Something you need to make a specific ask to the chief about – A topic for further discussion ▪ Based on the classifications, develop objectives for the routine ▪ Based on the objectives, fill in the rest of the agenda template ▪ Group ▪ 25 minutes ▪ Brown paper ▪ Cards ▪ Flipchart ▪ Sample output of self- assessment ▪ Markers Materials

8 7 ©2014 U.S. Education Delivery Institute While running a routine, it is important that the roles are clear to everyone Holding others accountable Being held accountable Commissioner “Prime Minister” ▪ Holds others accountable for results ▪ Asks tough questions that challenge and support ▪ Actively engages in problem-solving Delivery Unit Leader Broker ▪ Prepares Prime Minister for meeting ▪ Designs agenda, keeps meeting on track Delivery Unit Member Analyst ▪ Prepares data and evaluations ▪ Works with accountable leaders to prepare Assistant Commissioner Accountable leader ▪ Holds overall accountability for the plan’s success ▪ Answers the Prime Minister’s questions and actively solves problems College and Career Readiness Director Accountable leader ▪ Holds day-to-day accountability for the plan’s success ▪ Manages the team to implement the plan ▪ Works with delivery unit and provides evidence to arrive at current assessment of progress, in consultation with sponsor

9 8 ©2014 U.S. Education Delivery Institute We offer this advice to the “delivery leader” to keep the routine running smoothly ▪ Ensure the “accountable leaders” and “prime minister” are briefed ahead of time so that no one is surprised by the conversation ▪ Record next steps throughout the meeting in a public space (flipchart paper or projected on screen) – this is also an opportunity to push for clear next steps if the conversation has gotten off-track ▪ Allow the accountable leader to present on progress and next steps, but be heavily engaged in the facilitation of the conversation; push it forward when it is off-track

10 9 ©2014 U.S. Education Delivery Institute You can also set the “prime minister” up with particular questions or probe which will help show they are prepared Type of InquiryExamples Encourage prioritization and focus on root causes ■ “What are the top three barriers that you face to making this work?” ■ “What are the top three messages that you’d want to send to the “prime minister?” ■ “Where in the graduation pipeline is the biggest issue, and why?” Put them in the shoes of the front-line or end user ■ “If you had a group of teachers or students here right now, what would they say are the biggest reasons for dropout?” ■ “That’s a really great articulation of the issue. If I spoke to teachers or students, would they give a similar message?” Use “what-if” questions to test the possibilities ■ “How much would we improve if we got the bottom quartile to perform at the level of the current average?” ■ “How much would we improve if every teacher in every classroom just got one more student to score ‘proficient’ this year?” Use comparisons to find solutions ■ “Are there other states that have the same issue as us but aren’t struggling in the same way? What do they do about it?” Suspend disbelief ■ “What would it take to increase graduation rate by 10% next year? If there were no constraints, what would it take?”

11 10 ©2014 U.S. Education Delivery Institute You can also set the “prime minister” up with particular questions or probe which will help show they are prepared Type of InquiryExamples Hold others to their own standards ■ “How do you know that what you’re focusing on will improve student performance?” ■ “Your commitment to narrowing gaps is inspiring; how do you intend to address the special education student gap?” Test assertions ■ You mentioned that you thought your team was strong. How do you know that? Follow premises to the logical conclusion ■ “If you have a goal, why wouldn’t you have a plan that shows how you intend to deliver on that goal?” ■ “If you are trying to focus on performance, wouldn’t it be important to collect this information?” Use comparisons to provide challenge and to take excuses off the table ■ 1: “I don’t see how 75% proficiency is possible, given our level of disadvantage.” 2: “Well, the district down the road is getting 90% and they have the same level of disadvantage as us – so what’s stopping our district?”

12 11 ©2014 U.S. Education Delivery Institute We encourage you to view video of a stocktake in Massachusetts which is a good example of how to run a routine Clip 1: System Leader Introduces the Purpose and Sets the Tone Clip 2: Literacy Team Discusses their Delivery Goal Clip 3: Literacy Team is Challenged about their Ambition, Goal-Setting, and Trajectories Clip 4: Math Team Discusses their Delivery Goal Clip 5: Goal Leader Presents Ideas for Next Steps Clip 6 & 7: Team Discusses What Success Would Look Like for the Next Stocktake and System Leader Closes the Meeting


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