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© 2005 SHRM SHRM Weekly Online Survey: November 8, 2005 Ethics Sample comprised of 347 randomly selected HR professionals. Analyzing 347 responses of 2828.

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Presentation on theme: "© 2005 SHRM SHRM Weekly Online Survey: November 8, 2005 Ethics Sample comprised of 347 randomly selected HR professionals. Analyzing 347 responses of 2828."— Presentation transcript:

1 © 2005 SHRM SHRM Weekly Online Survey: November 8, 2005 Ethics Sample comprised of 347 randomly selected HR professionals. Analyzing 347 responses of s sent, s were received (response rate = 15%). Survey fielded November 8 – November 14, 2005; presentation generated on November 16, Margin of error is +/- 4%

2 © 2005 SHRM SHRM Weekly Online Survey: November 8, 2005 Have you quit a job as an HR Professional for ethical reasons?

3 © 2005 SHRM SHRM Weekly Online Survey: November 8, 2005 Have you quit a job as an HR Professional for ethical reasons? ChoiceCountPercentage Answered Yes5616.1% No %

4 © 2005 SHRM SHRM Weekly Online Survey: November 8, 2005 Top five ethical reasons HR professional have/would quit their job Based on respondents who indicated they have quit a job due to ethical reasons

5 © 2005 SHRM SHRM Weekly Online Survey: November 8, 2005 Ethical reasons HR Professionals have/would quit a job Management lying to employees, customers, vendors, shareholders, or the public 77.5% Lying on reports or falsifying records 74.6% Mishandling employee 401(k) retirement accounts73.3% Misrepresenting company financial assets63.9% Violating the privacy of employees63.3% Violations of Title VII (Discrimination based on race, color, gender, age or similar categories) 63.0% Altering results of products/service testing60.4% Violating antitrust laws58.0% Sexual harassment56.5% Misusing the organization’s assets or proprietary information56.2% Employees accepting or giving bribes, kickbacks, or gifts that may conflict with organizational responsibilities 54.1% Percentage may not total 100% because multiple response were allowed N=338

6 © 2005 SHRM SHRM Weekly Online Survey: November 8, 2005 Employees engage in fraud54.1% Misusing insider information52.1% Violating environmental laws or regulations51.8% Stealing/theft50.9% Violations of the FLSA (Fair Labor Standards Act) 50.9% Violations of OSHA regulations 46.4% Violations of the FMLA (Family and Medical Leave Act)44.7% Improperly obtaining competitors’ proprietary information44.1% Misreporting actual time or hours worked 41.7% Employees lying to supervisors19.5% Other8.9% Percentage may not total 100% because multiple response were allowed N=338 Reasons HR Professionals have/would quit a job cont’d

7 © 2005 SHRM SHRM Weekly Online Survey: November 8, 2005 Other Pressure to change religious beliefs to match employer beliefs policy inconsistency and no employee accountability personnel mistreatment personal reasons Owners adding family members to medical plan that did not work for the company; EEs paying for medical coverage and Owner/Family Members getting medical free Opportunity for growth none of the above No hope for change Most should be dealt with by HR. I would quit if top management wasn't willing to address the issues. Most I would deal with, not quit Mismanagement of employee records and poor employee management Mgmt style issues Manager asking to lie on his behalf Management practices that were in conflict with personal core values Management mistreating customers (insulting in public); (in another position) management mistreating employees (discriminatory discipline, although not Title VII) Management accepted harassment or intimidation of employees Lack of support from Executive Team Lack of respect for employees Intentional violations of above improper use of funds & poor employee treatment

8 © 2005 SHRM SHRM Weekly Online Survey: November 8, 2005 Other continued If I'm not able to correct an unethical problem If asked to commit fraud or falsify documents I would work to have that person leave--potentially I would leave a job for any of the above yet it depends on the intentionality and depth of issue. I would report harassment or theft not quit a job if I observed it. I would like to be clear that I would not tolerate my employer intentionally violating any law or ethical standard. I do realize that "employees" may sometimes violate these circumstances and I would expect the employer to deal with those situations. I would leave for any of the above reasons if not resolved I could have checked all the reasons listed if I understood them to be perpetrated by or sanctioned by management. For violations of any of the above reasons by individual employees, I would work within the internal system to rectify. Hostile Work Environment horrible, mean, toxic boss - very poor manager, mistreating people - went ahead against my personal values Have quit senior position, when my boss asked me to lie about his participation in a "deal that went bad" - currently making 25% of my previous salary and no longer have benefits Handling of a layoff - several years ago gender bias, and ignoring the importance of Hr For many of the things I checked, I would only quit if I was forced to turn a blind eye or cover it up. I would not quit over an employee engaging in fraud, since I'm able to address and deal with it. If I was asked to cover it up, then I'd work elsewhere Executives not fired but employees are for the same offense (e.g. sexual harassment); that is one of the reasons I left an employer. There were different rules for executives. VP of HR was aware of the sexual harassment but nothing happened. Employers taking credit for employees' work Disrespectful treatment of employees by management. depends on how org handles the issue; if addressed and resolved appropriately, I wouldn't quit (applies to all the violations)

9 © 2005 SHRM SHRM Weekly Online Survey: November 8, 2005 Other continued Depending upon the severity of the above, I think all could be a reason for terminating. Deliberate continuation of any of the above activities after discovery. compensation not based on background and experience and coworkers with less adequate background paid the same. bouncing a paycheck Better Opportunities Being asked to do something that goes against my integrity and honesty, period. As an HR professional my job is to address all of the above anything illegal or that I felt was unethical that the company would not correct or support my efforts to correct Any of the above, if I was unable to effect change. Any mistreatment of employees that went above and beyond what you could discipline and have the other management team members support any known illegal or unethical practices, where corrective action is not taken immediately and seriously. All of the above, assuming you tried to correct the situation and there was willful opposition. Your first duty would be to try to fix the situation not abandon it. All of the above, although it would depend on the circumstances of the particular issue, whether widespread (company policy or culture issue) or an individual case. All of the above

10 © 2005 SHRM SHRM Weekly Online Survey: November 8, 2005 Other continued would leave if couldn't rectify any of the above situations Violating Company Safety Policies and Practices Upper management continuously conducting themselves unethically and/or illegally despite pleas for ethical and legal practices from other managers. Told by executive management to do something that was unlawful This survey is odd - why would anyone continue working for an employer who engaged in any of these activities? This question is not well-worded. Are you asking whether I would quit because I did these things or others did. And if others did, wouldn't it be my responsibility as an HR professional to rectify the situation, rather than living with it or quitting? These all the depend on the circumstances and gravity of situation as well as management's role/approach to the situation; none of these would be reasons in sr management condemns the actions and acts properly to fix the issues The assumption is that I would leave an organization if any of the above issues were known to the senior executive and nothing was done to correct and eliminate the problem. Some of these depend on the level of the person committing the offense - management vs. line workers. If a line worker, could be handled through disciplinary process. If management, there is a core issue that may not be able to be affected by HR, and I'd probably none / I'm a single parent dependent on my income with nothing to fall back on


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