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Michael L. Kamil Stanford University.  What Common Core is and is not  Why we need Common Core  Requirements for College and Work  ELA and disciplinary.

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Presentation on theme: "Michael L. Kamil Stanford University.  What Common Core is and is not  Why we need Common Core  Requirements for College and Work  ELA and disciplinary."— Presentation transcript:

1 Michael L. Kamil Stanford University

2  What Common Core is and is not  Why we need Common Core  Requirements for College and Work  ELA and disciplinary standards  Disciplinary standards  Text variables and complexity  Implications for Special Education June 12, 2012 CASE Sanibel Island

3  Aligned with college and work  Rigorous content and high-order skills  Use strengths of current standards June 12, 2012 CASE Sanibel Island

4  Informed by international data  Evidence and/or research-based June 12, 2012 CASE Sanibel Island

5  Grade levels for K–8;  Grade bands for 9–10 and 11–12  Integrated model of literacy  Includes research & media skills June 12, 2012 CASE Sanibel Island

6  HOW to teach  ALL that can or should be taught  Definition of ADVANCED work  INTERVENTIONS for advanced or struggling students June 12, 2012 CASE Sanibel Island

7  Support for ELL or SPECIAL NEEDS  WHOLE of college/work readiness June 12, 2012 CASE Sanibel Island

8 "By 2018, we will need 22 million new workers with college degrees“ “63% of all jobs will require college by 2018” Help Wanted June 12, 2012 CASE Sanibel Island

9 Help Wanted June 12, 2012 CASE Sanibel Island

10 June 12, 2012 CASE Sanibel Island

11  Comprehend and evaluate complex text across disciplines.  Construct effective arguments and convey multifaceted information. June 12, 2012 CASE Sanibel Island

12  Build knowledge in different subjects.  Become proficient in new areas.  Read purposefully.  Refine knowledge and share it. June 12, 2012 CASE Sanibel Island

13  Consider context in reading.  Appreciate nuances.  Know that different disciplines use different evidence. June 12, 2012 CASE Sanibel Island

14  Open-minded, skeptical, readers.  Understand what authors are saying.  Question an author’s assumptions.  Assess the veracity of claims. June 12, 2012 CASE Sanibel Island

15  Cite text evidence for interpretations.  Make reasoning clear.  Evaluate others’ use of evidence. June 12, 2012 CASE Sanibel Island

16  Mindful of impact of vocabulary.  Compare meanings of different choices.  Attend to when precision matters. June 12, 2012 CASE Sanibel Island

17  Attend to structure when reading.  Understand presenting information in different disciplines.  Understand how author’s craft relates to setting and plot. June 12, 2012 CASE Sanibel Island

18  Employ technology thoughtfully.  Efficiently search online for information.  Integrate online and offline information.  Select best suited media for goals. June 12, 2012 CASE Sanibel Island

19 Students actively seek to understand other perspectives and cultures through reading and listening. They can communicate effectively with people of varied backgrounds. They evaluate other points of view critically and constructively. June 12, 2012 CASE Sanibel Island

20 June 12, 2012 CASE Sanibel Island

21 1. Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it. 2. Determine central ideas or themes and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas. 3. Analyze how and why individuals, events, and ideas develop in a text. June 12, 2012 CASE Sanibel Island

22 4. Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning. 5. Analyze the structure of texts, including how specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions relate to each other and the whole. 6. Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text. June 12, 2012 CASE Sanibel Island

23 7. Integrate and evaluate content presented in words and diverse media. 8. Delineate and evaluate the argument in a text, as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence. 9. Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics. June 12, 2012 CASE Sanibel Island

24 10. Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently. June 12, 2012 CASE Sanibel Island

25  6-8 Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources.  attending to such features as the date and origin of the information.  connecting insights gained from specific details to an understanding of the text as a whole. June 12, 2012 CASE Sanibel Island

26  6-8 Determine the central ideas or conclusions of a text; provide an accurate summary of the text distinct from prior knowledge or opinions.  trace the text’s explanation or depiction of a complex process, phenomenon, or concept; provide an accurate summary of the text.  summarize complex concepts, processes, or information presented in a text by paraphrasing them in simpler but still accurate terms. June 12, 2012 CASE Sanibel Island

27 Literature: By immersing themselves in literature, students enlarge their experiences and deepen their understanding of their own and other cultures. June 12, 2012 CASE Sanibel Island

28 Information Text: Because most college and workplace reading is nonfiction, students need to hone their ability to acquire knowledge from informational texts. June 12, 2012 CASE Sanibel Island

29 Multimedia Documents: Students must be able to integrate what they learn from reading text with what they learn from audio, video, and other digital media. June 12, 2012 CASE Sanibel Island

30 Procedural Text: Procedural texts convey information in the form of directions for accomplishing a task. Such text is composed of discrete steps in a strict sequence, with an implicit end product or goal. June 12, 2012 CASE Sanibel Island

31  Documents: Documents require readers to draw on information presented as short continuous prose and also as columns, matrices, or other formats. Document structures can be simple or complex, embeded or “nested” information within the document structure. June 12, 2012 CASE Sanibel Island

32 Students must have the capacity to handle independently the quantity of reading material, in print and online, required in college and workforce training. The amount of reading in high school is often far lower than that required for typical first-year college courses. June 12, 2012 CASE Sanibel Island

33  Differentiated texts  Literary text Story Literary nonfiction essay, speech, biography Poetry June 12, 2012 CASE Sanibel Island

34  Information text Exposition Argumentation and persuasion Document and procedural June 12, 2012 CASE Sanibel Island

35 Electronic text or Hypertext: A text with navigation tools that requires nonsequential reading. Readers construct “customised” texts from portions of text. Not all text is present. June 12, 2012 CASE Sanibel Island

36 GRADELITERARYINFORMATION 450% 845%55% 12NAEP = 30% CC = 25% NAEP = 70% CC = 75% June 12, 2012 CASE Sanibel Island

37 Structure Purpose Style and Language Richness Relationships Knowledge Demands June 12, 2012 CASE Sanibel Island

38  Special Education and Common Core  A difficult task  Prepare ALL students for College or Work  Some advantages of Special Education  RtI is a natural for Common Core  Technology and Special Education June 12, 2012 CASE Sanibel Island

39  What Common Core is and is not  Why we need Common Core  Requirements for College and Work  ELA and disciplinary standards  Disciplinary standards  Text variables and complexity  Implications for Special Education June 12, 2012 CASE Sanibel Island

40 THE END June 12, 2012 CASE Sanibel Island


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