Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Interstate Compact for Juveniles State Council Training Updated January 2014.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Interstate Compact for Juveniles State Council Training Updated January 2014."— Presentation transcript:

1 Interstate Compact for Juveniles State Council Training Updated January 2014

2 Overview This training will cover: The reasons for forming a state council The required membership of a state council Duties of individual state council members Legal background of the Compact The rulemaking process of the Commission Serving Juveniles While Protecting Communities 2

3 Introduction and History Original compact enacted in 1955 Revised compact enacted in 2008 Ensures effective monitoring of juvenile offenders moving across state lines Provides for the welfare and protection of juveniles and the public Serves as the only legal process for returning runaways 3

4 4 Advantages of the New Compact Provides enhanced: –Accountability –Enforcement –Visibility –Communication Resolves discrepancies between state laws Serving Juveniles While Protecting Communities

5 Purpose of the ICJ Promote public safety Protect rights of victims Control movement of youth Provide for effective tracking Supervision Rehabilitation 5

6 Serving Juveniles While Protecting Communities National Structure 6

7 Serving Juveniles While Protecting Communities Role of the State Council Provide mechanism for empowerment of Compact process Assist in developing Compact policy Determine qualifications for membership on Council Appoint designee when Commissioner is unable to attend State Council Governor Representative Legislative Representative Judicial Representative Victim’s Advocate Commissioner 7

8 Why Is It Necessary to Have State Councils? State Councils address 3 problems – 1.The Interstate Commission for Juveniles may be unknown outside the agency where the Commissioner works 2.Interstate compliance is not exclusively an issue for one state agency 3.Interstate supervision is a significant policy concern 8Serving Juveniles While Protecting Communities

9 Empowerment Each state is required by statute to establish a state council for overseeing its intrastate affairs dealing with the Compact. An active State Council can have a positive influence on a state’s Compact operations. –State councils can serve as an advocate when seeking resources, improving operations, resolving disputes and conducting training. 9

10 Serving Juveniles While Protecting CommunitiesMembership States determine the structure, composition and budget of their State Council. –must include at least one representative from the legislative, executive and judicial branches of government, victim groups, other community interest groups, and the Compact Administrator, Deputy or designee. 10

11 State Council Appointments Factors to consider when recommending appointments include: –Is the candidate willing to serve on the council? –Does the candidate have a demonstrated interest in the Compact process? –Is the individual well known in the juvenile justice community? –Is the candidate influential? Serving Juveniles While Protecting Communities 11

12 Serving Juveniles While Protecting Communities State Council Members Should Be: Familiar with the Compact and its purpose Educated on your state’s Compact process Familiar with how your state appoints the Compact Administrator and Commissioner Familiar with the authority vested in the Interstate Commission Familiar with the process if the Commissioner cannot attend a Commission meeting 12

13 Serving Juveniles While Protecting Communities Council Members – cont. Assist in determining if the Compact Office has adequate staff for the operation of the Compact Become familiar with the rules of the Compact and discuss any desired additions or amendments Assist the Commissioner in developing a network within your state to assist with the Compact process Discuss the addition of other members that may lend assistance to the Compact process Serve as an advocate for ICJ 13

14 Serving Juveniles While Protecting Communities Preliminary Activities for the Council Develop the Council’s –By-laws –Mission Statement –Short and long term plans –Goals and objectives Establish Meeting Procedures –Scheduling –Notices –Meeting Minutes –Voting procedures 14

15 Staying Energized Projects that are helpful to the ICJ Office and suitable for engaging the Council include: –Developing a dispute resolution policy and procedure –Assessing Compact office workloads and needs –Recommending changes in Compact Office business process and procedures –Recommending changes to the Compact rules Serving Juveniles While Protecting Communities 15

16 State Council Enforcement Policy By January 1 of each year, member states and territories shall submit the following information regarding their state council to the National Office: –State council membership roster –Meeting dates from previous year Serving Juveniles While Protecting Communities 16

17 17 Legal Background of the ICJ Serving Juveniles While Protecting Communities

18 18 Interstate Compacts –contractual agreements between the states enacted through legislative means and adopted to resolve a dispute, study a problem or create an on-going administrative mechanism for managing an interstate agreement Serving Juveniles While Protecting Communities

19 19 Interstate Compacts – cont. Agreements between states authorized under Article I, Section 10, Clause 3 of the U.S. Constitution – the “Compact Clause” The U.S. Supreme Court has consistently held that Congressional consent is only required for Compacts that tend to increase the political power of the states in a manner that encroaches upon or interferes with the just supremacy of the United States. Serving Juveniles While Protecting Communities

20 Implications of Congressional Consent Transforms an interstate Compact into federal law under the “law of the union doctrine.” –This transformation is not only for jurisdictional or interpretative purposes. –Consent makes a Compact substantive federal law. Makes a Compact enforceable under the Supremacy Clause and the Contract Clause. Serving Juveniles While Protecting Communities 20

21 Implications – cont. Places ultimate responsibility for interpretation and enforcement in the federal courts, and ultimately the U.S. Supreme Court. Requires that all courts give effect to a Compact even to the extent that state law (constitutional or statutory) must yield to its terms and conditions. Makes available to aggrieved parties the full range of federal court enforcement including not only the relief authorized by the Compact but also federal injunctive relief where necessary. A state court cannot declare an interstate Compact to be invalid on state constitutional grounds without subjecting that normally un-reviewable decision of state law to further U.S. Supreme Court review to protect the federal interest and the interests of the other signatories. Serving Juveniles While Protecting Communities 21

22 22Compacts Approximately 200 Compacts formed since the founding of the U.S. –About 38 are inactive –On average, each state is a member of 23 Compacts Creation of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey in 1922 signaled a new era in regulatory Compacts Serving Juveniles While Protecting Communities

23 Why Are Compacts so Appealing? Important Advantages: Flexible, enforceable means of cooperation Interstate uniformity without federal intervention –i.e., best of both worlds States give up right to act unilaterally, but retain shared control (“collective sovereignty”) Alternative/deterrent to federal intervention and preemption Power sharing among the states 23

24 Authority of the ICJ Crime Control Act, 4 U.S.C. Section 112 (1965) Authorizes and encourages states to form cooperative efforts and mutual assistance in the prevention of crime A state law, court rule, or regulation that contradicts or the rules of the Commission is invalid to the extent of the conflict. All courts and executive agencies are subject to the Interstate Compact for Juveniles Article I, V, & VII Serving Juveniles While Protecting Communities 24

25 Serving Juveniles While Protecting Communities Legal Authority Summary Article I, Section 10, Clause 3 of the U.S. Constitution authorizes Compacts between states; A Compact with Congressional consent becomes a “law of the United States.” The U.S. Supreme Court recognized that Congressional consent transforms a Compact into federal law under the Compact Clause. Compact rules supersede any state laws in conflict with them. 25

26 26 Rules Serving Juveniles While Protecting Communities

27 Rulemaking Power Commission rules must be adopted in a manner that is substantially similar to the process of the Administrative Procedures Act. Once adopted, the rules have the force and effect of statutory law and supersede any inconsistent state laws. Majority of state legislatures can reject a proposed rule. 27

28 Proposing New Rules or Changes Proposed new rules or amendments to the rules shall be adopted by majority vote of the members of the Commission in the following manner: –Any ICJ Commissioner or Designee may submit proposed rules or amendments for referral to the Rules Committee during the annual meeting of the Commission. –Standing ICJ Committees may propose rules or amendments by a majority vote of that committee. – ICJ Regions may propose rules or amendments by a majority vote of members of that region. Rule Serving Juveniles While Protecting Communities 28

29 Enforcement Power Commission has authority to enforce the Compact and its rules upon the states by: –Requiring remedial training –Requiring mediation/arbitration of dispute –Imposing monetary fines on a state –Seeking relief in federal court, most likely by obtaining an injunction to curtail state action or compel compliance Serving Juveniles While Protecting Communities 29

30 Who is Served by the Compact? The Compact provides services for a juvenile who –Is on probation or parole and plans to move out of state –Is a non-delinquent who runs away to another state –Escapes from an institution to another state –Absconds from probation/parole to another state –Is an accused delinquent who runs away to another state –Requires institutional care and specialized services in another state Serving Juveniles While Protecting Communities 30

31 Who is NOT Covered by ICJ? Children and youth going to another state for placement in residential facilities Children and youth going to another state for educational purposes Children and youth under a court order from another state for mental health treatment Serving Juveniles While Protecting Communities 31

32 Questions? Serving Juveniles While Protecting Communities 32

33 Serving Juveniles While Protecting Communities Contact Information National Office Interstate Commission for Juveniles 836 Euclid Avenue Suite 322 Lexington, KY (859)


Download ppt "Interstate Compact for Juveniles State Council Training Updated January 2014."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google