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Daniel E. Nichols, P.E..  History of Uniform Code  Applicability and enforcement  Flood provisions: facts vs. myths  Protection in the future  Wrap-up/questions.

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Presentation on theme: "Daniel E. Nichols, P.E..  History of Uniform Code  Applicability and enforcement  Flood provisions: facts vs. myths  Protection in the future  Wrap-up/questions."— Presentation transcript:

1 Daniel E. Nichols, P.E.

2  History of Uniform Code  Applicability and enforcement  Flood provisions: facts vs. myths  Protection in the future  Wrap-up/questions

3  Fire Protection Engineer; New York State Department of State  Division of Code Enforcement and Administration  Currently assigned to Kingston regional office  Chairman, Fire Code Technical Subcommittee  Active participant and manager; Disaster assistance response teams to southern tier, Catskills, and Long Island  Member of several International Code Council Committees  IBC- Fire Safety (past chairman)  IBC- General  CTC- Elevator Lobby  Ad Hoc on Healthcare  Member of several National Fire Protection Association Committees  Historic Buildings and Cultural Resources  Residential Board and Care  Research Foundation on Smoke Alarm Functionality

4  In the early 1950’s, the Multiple Dwelling Law and Multiple Residence Law were created  First statewide requirements for construction  Still in effect todaay  At the same time, State Government starts to create a voluntary adoptable construction standard  “State Building Construction Code”  Very reminiscent to the first edition of the Basic Building Code, published by Building Officials and Code Administrators (BOCA)  All building types covered by 1959 (single family, residential, and commercial)

5  In the early 1970’s, State Government creates a voluntary adoptable fire prevention standard  “Uniform Fire Prevention Code”  In 1980, a survey shows that approximately 30% of the State has some sort of building or fire prevention code in place  Mainly found around the big 5 cities, Long Island, and the Hudson Valley  Communities could adopt any standards they wish; at least 6 different building codes a 3 different fire prevention codes were in place; not counting self- created documents

6  Two major fires  November 21, 1980; MGM Grand- Las Vagas, NV  Hotel/Casino Fire- 85 dead  December 4, 1980; Stouffers Inn- Harrison, NY  Conference Center- 26 dead  Contributing factors identified were the inconsistency of building and fire prevention codes; or lack thereof  Town of Harrison did not have any codes  Neighboring City of White Plains had a very restrictive building and fire prevention ordinance  Stouffers was built on the line

7  Chapter 707 of the Laws of 1981 created the “Uniform Fire Prevention and Building Code Act”  Article 18 of the Executive Law  Unique in it’s application  Creates a Statewide Building and Fire Prevetion Code  Locals cannot adopt laws to lower the minimum requirements  Locals cannot adopt laws to raise the minimum requirements without State approval  Locals are required to enforce the Uniform Code, or surrender their authority to the State  Governments, including the State itself, is obligated to enforcement on government-owned buildings and premises  All governments must be enforcing ‘something’ by 1982  All governments must use the new Uniform Fire Prevention and Building Code by 1984

8  Each City, Town, Village and County is responsible for code enforcement within their jurisdiction  Counties enforce requirements on county-owned buildings  Any county or local government can ‘opt-out’ of code enforcement  Reverts to the next level of government of as delegated by the Secretary of State  Must meet the minimum requirements set by the Secretary of State  19 NYCRR Part 1203  City of New York permitted to continue with building and fire codes by Executive Law  State Agencies must also follow the Uniform Code  Done with an agency-designated code compliance manager  Many agencies delegate their responsibility to other agencies  OGS, DHESES, etc.

9  Several State Agencies have licenses and/or construction requirements that are aligned/misaligned with the Uniform Code  Department of Health  Day Programs  Assisted Living  Cross connection requirements (Plumbing)  Office of Mental Health  Office of Persons with Developmental Disabilities  Department of Environmental Conservation  Department of Labor  The Uniform Code is a regulation, and is not automatically superseded by other regulations

10  Flood-resistant construction is based upon whether a building is in a ‘flood hazard area’  Within the 1% chance per year flood plain (100 year event)  Designated as a flood hazard area on a community’s flood hazard map or otherwise designated

11 RUNOFF FLOODING WAVE ACTION FLOODING

12  “Flood evacuation zones”  Developed by local jurisdictions to prioritize evacuation needs, based on flood potential, access, and population  Not a tool for determining flood-resistance of buildings  Useful as part of a fire safety and evacuation plan  “Freeboard”  A prescriptive elevation requirement within the Residential Code of New York State and ASCE 24 BOTH TERMS ARE NOT USED WITHIN THE BUILDING CODE OF NEW YORK STATE

13  Determine Building Category  Medical buildings (Group I-2) with surgery or ED: Category 4  Other medical buildings (Group I-2) over 50 patients: Category 3  Other medical buildings, such as residential board and care, assisted living, and small nursing homes: Category 2

14  Determine flood hazard area  Base flood Elevation  Design Flood Elevation  Zone categories

15 Highlights of ASCE24-05; FEMA.GOV

16  Flood design becomes an issue in the 1970’s  Model Building Code began recognition long after the National Flood Insurance Program is developed  State of New York updates the code to national standards in 2003 (previously based on 1951)  City of New York updates the code to national standards in 2008 (previously based on 1968)

17  Building codes are not retroactive for construction features  Flood-resistant construction is required for:  New buildings  Additions  Substantially damaged

18

19  Adopted building code in almost every state and territory in the United States of America  Based on the combination of 3 regional model code groups in 2000  Takes regional information and experience and makes it available to all  Flooding- Mississippi, Texas  Hurricanes: Carolinas, Florida, Louisiana  Snow- Colorado, Maine, Vermont, Alaska  Wildfires- Arizona, Utah, New York  Earthquakes- California, Hawaii

20  Emergency Power supplies  Building access  Stairs/ramps  Personnel  Evacuation  Medical needs  Oxygen  Waste disposal  Fuel sources

21 Daniel E. Nichols, P.E. New York State Department of State Division of Code Enforcement and Administration 1 Albany Ave. Suite G-5 Kingston, NY


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