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Parenting in a Digital World – Keeping Children Safe Online Consider how to take Good Parenting online Discussion on latest research and Risks (3 C’s –

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Presentation on theme: "Parenting in a Digital World – Keeping Children Safe Online Consider how to take Good Parenting online Discussion on latest research and Risks (3 C’s –"— Presentation transcript:

1 Parenting in a Digital World – Keeping Children Safe Online Consider how to take Good Parenting online Discussion on latest research and Risks (3 C’s – Content Contact Conduct) Choose quality technology to support children's learning and enjoyment, amongst a mix of other offline activities! Building children’s resilience online as they get older Practical tips and tools: –Conversation starters –Getting Involved with your child’s online activity –Filtering updates, family boundaries –General Support - Age ratings of Apps/games, when to buy your child a mobile phone ….. Contact

2 Parent leaflets (13 different languages) Reminders from today’s sessions Conversations starters Signpost to key organisations Practical tips “What can I do now?”

3 Foster Carers Things to think about when planning a placement Privacy and confidentiality Establishing trust and giving advice What to do if something goes wrong Adoptive Parents Managing online contact with birth family members Managing your family’s online presence Preparing for and responding to unmanaged contact This session can be used with Foster carers & Adoptive Parents – 2 leaflets support discussion points below:

4 That was Then

5 This is now

6 Chinese city opens 'phone lane' for texting pedestrians 15 million texts a minute

7 Remember Tech is positive – Tech City/Old Street, New Computing Curriculum, Year of Code

8 Ofcom – August 2013 – Changing Family Life

9 What tech Is your family using?

10 Every year regulator Ofcom releases a report looking at children's use of digital services. Its most recent, released in October, surveyed 1,600 children aged five to 15. There has been a significant increase in access to, ownership of and use of tablet computers by children of all ages. In contrast, the incidence of TVs and games consoles in the bedroom is declining, while smartphone ownership remains steady. Almost twice as many children aged 5-15 are going online via a tablet than in (11 per cent of children aged three to four now having their own tablet, up from 3 per cent in 2013) Younger children still prefer TV to any other device, and spend more time in a typical week watching TV than doing any other media activity. Parents also treat boys and girls differently, monitoring some aspects of girls’ online activity more closely than boys’. Gender differences are evident from an early age. Differences include a preference for gaming among boys and for communicating online among girls.

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12 What Worries you? Newspaper headlines are a great Conversation starter with your child

13 OFSTED Common risks: Content exposure to inappropriate content, including online pornography, ignoring age ratings in games (exposure to violence associated with often racist language), substance abuse lifestyle websites, for example pro-anorexia/self-harm/suicide sites hate sites content validation: how to check authenticity and accuracy of online content

14 Video sharing sites

15 Extreme Content Commonly Shared and Viewed by Young People

16 Parents can to choose to set filtering via home internet provider carers/parental-controls

17 Grooming (including with sexual intent or with the intent to radicalise) cyber-bullying in all forms (this is what worries many children/young people the most) identity theft (including ‘frape’ hacking Facebook profiles) and sharing passwords Contact

18 privacy issues, including disclosure of personal information digital footprint and online reputation health and well-being (amount of time spent online (internet or gaming) sexting (sending images of child is illegal) copyright (little care or consideration for intellectual property and ownership (for example music and film) Common risks: Conduct

19 “Just like in the offline world, no amount of effort to reduce potential risks to children will eliminate those risks completely. We cannot make the internet completely safe. Because of this, we must also build children’s resilience to the material to which they may be exposed so that they have the confidence and skills to navigate these new media waters more safely” Safer Children in a Digital World The Report of the Byron Review

20 Tools for parents Get involved - Choose quality and age appropriate technology together amongst a mix of other offline activities Conversations - Talk, support and reinforce you are there if things go wrong Talk to your child’s school Agree Boundaries for whole family (including parents!) tech at bedtime, weekends, bathtime, mealtimes, screen time) Passwords, Google SafeSearch, YouTube Safety Mode Parental controls on your Internet service (http://www.internetmatters.org) (e.g. BT Family Protection) Parental controls and separate accounts on your computer Parental controls on your mobile phone (e.g. Vodafone Content Control) Parental controls on your games console (e.g. Nintendo DS and important control to turn off 3d for children under 7, Xbox and restriction of Xbox live) Facebook privacy controls

21 Embrace Technology - City Old Street – future careers, New Computing Curriculum, Year of Code!

22 Be Creators not just Consumers!

23 Take time together to explore and choose quality Apps, Games and Websites https://www.commonsensemedia.org/ app-reviews


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