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Pre-registration briefing for those wishing to become childminders

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1 Pre-registration briefing for those wishing to become childminders
Welcome participants. Introduce yourself and briefly explain your role. The purpose of the briefing is to: give some background information about Ofsted, which is the government department responsible for registering and inspecting childminders explain the process for applying to register as a childminder on the Early Years Register explain the process for applying to register as a childminder on the compulsory and voluntary parts of the Childcare Register. Reassure participants that this is an introductory session, and that they will receive further help, support and training from their local authority. Tell participants that they can ask questions as they arise and that you will be available at the end of the briefing to answer any individual queries. January 2014

2 Ofsted’s role Register applicants
Inspect childminders regularly after registration Consider any information about childminders that suggest they may not be meeting requirements for registration Take enforcement action when necessary Ofsted is the government body responsible for the registration and inspection of childminders. Ofsted’s legal powers are set out in the Childcare Act A rigorous process for registration is important, because this gives the best protection for children and reassurance to parents. Inspecting registered childminders contributes to improving the quality of childcare and early education by making judgements about the quality of the care that childminders offer, and recommendations about how to improve this. Childminders must provide evidence of their continued suitability and show how they meet requirements at inspection. Ofsted often receives information from parents and others about the childminding provision. To ensure that registered providers continue to remain suitable for registration, Ofsted may carry out an inspection, refer the information back to the childminder or investigate the matter. Where childminders cannot provide evidence that they meet requirements, Ofsted may give them actions to improve. Where there are serious concerns, Ofsted may take other enforcement action to bring about improvement. These powers include, in extreme cases, prosecution and refusal, suspension or cancellation of registration. Pre-registration briefing for those wishing to become childminders | 2

3 Ofsted’s aims Ofsted’s aims through regulation are to:
protect children ensure that childcare providers provide good outcomes for children ensure that childcare providers meet the requirements of the Early Years Foundation Stage and the Childcare Register promote high quality in the provision of care and early education provide reassurance for parents. Ofsted’s aims in registering childminders are primarily to make sure that children are safe, well cared for, and that they make good progress in their learning and development. The government set out a number of requirements that all those who offer services for children, including childminders, must meet. These are set out in the Early Years Foundation Stage for younger children up to the age of five, and the requirements of the Childcare Register for children aged five and over. We will look at these in more detail later. Inspection is one way in which Ofsted contributes to improving the quality of care and early education, by judging the quality of what a childminder provides and how to improve it. Regulation gives parents reassurance that they are placing their children with adults who are suitable to do the important job of caring for their children. Pre-registration briefing for those wishing to become childminders | 3

4 The role of the local authority
This is to provide: information to applicants and registered providers support and advice training for childcare workers access to approved pre-registration training and first aid training for childminder applicants information to parents about childcare services. Those applying to provide childminding and registered childminders can get information, advice and opportunities for training from their local authority. Further details on training for childminders are explained when we look at the registration process in detail later. Include details of how this local authority delivers these services, including the role of the Family Information Service in giving information to parents. Pre-registration briefing for those wishing to become childminders | 4

5 Types of childcare provision
Childminding Individuals looking after children on domestic premises, which is not the home of any of the children being cared for. Home childcarer Individuals caring for children in the children’s own home. Childcare on domestic premises Four or more people looking after children on domestic premises, including childminders and their assistants. Childcare on non-domestic premises Childcare on premises that are not domestic premises, such as nurseries or pre-schools. There are a number of different types of childcare set out on this slide. The next slides give you more details about what needs registration. Pre-registration briefing for those wishing to become childminders | 5

6 What is childminding? A childminder is one person, who can work with up to two other people at any time, looking after children on domestic premises for reward where at least one individual child attends for a total of more than two hours a day. Domestic premises means someone lives there: it is usually the home of one of the childminders. Reward is usually money, but can be any form of payment including goods, vouchers or money’s worth. Childminders can register on the Early Years Register, the compulsory and voluntary part of the Childcare Register or both registers Talk through the definition of a childminder. Childminding takes place on domestic premises – this means it is someone’s home, somewhere that is mainly or wholly used as living accommodation. This is usually your own home, but can be any domestic premises. For example, you can work with another registered childminder at that person’s home. It is not usually the child’s own home - we will come to that later. People may care for children without registration on domestic premises, if they do not accept a reward for doing this. This allows people to care for friends’ children as a favour or for a gift. However, if you are paid for caring for children, you must register as a childminder if: one of the children is under eight; you care for at least one child for more than two hours in any day; and the care takes place in your own home or another home that is not the child’s home. Payment may be money or other types of payment such as vouchers, for example for use in a supermarket or department store. It does not matter if this is a regular payment, a one-off payment, or full or part payment for the total amount you are charging. It also includes payment towards the costs involved in the childcare such as a contribution to heating and lighting, or paying for food or repairs to the place where the childminding happens. If you receive any type of payment other than an occasional gift such as a box of chocolates, a bunch of flowers, or a bottle of wine, you must register as a childminder if you care for children under eight. Ofsted has a factsheet, Childminding between friends, that gives more information if you are not sure if you need to register. If four or more people work together on domestic premises on any one day, the law does not count this as childminding, but as ‘childcare on domestic premises’. The next slide covers this type of care. Pre-registration briefing for those wishing to become childminders | 6

7 What is childcare on domestic premises?
Childcare on domestic premises is determined by the number of people either providing childcare or looking after children or a combination of both. Childcare on domestic premises is four or more people providing childcare or looking after children in someone’s home. They must meet the specific legal requirements that relate to childcare, rather than childminding. This is where four or more adults look after children in someone’s home at the same time. It includes people who would be childminders but for this requirement and anyone who works with them or for them such as assistants. These people must meet the specific legal requirements that relate to childcare, as opposed to childminding. This means that if you offer this sort of care you must appoint a suitable manager who has a full and relevant level 3 qualification and at least 50% of adults caring for children must hold a full and relevant level 2 qualification. If you wish to provide childcare on domestic premises, you should check the safeguarding and welfare requirements in the Statutory framework for the Early Years Foundation Stage and the requirements for the Childcare Register to make sure you follow the ones for childcare providers and not for childminders. Ofsted will check all household members, and everyone working in the house, including those working directly with children, if you want to offer this type of care. Pre-registration briefing for those wishing to become childminders | 7

8 Childminding: who needs to register?
You must register with Ofsted as a childminder if: you look after any children under the age of eight; and you look after at least one child for a total of more than two hours in any one day; and the care takes place on domestic premises; and you receive reward for doing do. You must register with Ofsted as a childminder if what you intend to do covers all four points on this slide. Pre-registration briefing for those wishing to become childminders | 8

9 Where you need to register
You will need to register on: the Early Years Register if you intend to care for children from birth to 31 August following their fifth birthday the Childcare Register if you intend to care for children from the end of the Early Years Foundation Stage to seven years of age. You can choose to register on: the voluntary part of the Childcare Register if you intend to care for children aged between eight and 17 years. Registration is compulsory for childcare providers looking after children aged from birth to seven years – unless they meet certain criteria for exemption. If you intend to care for children across the whole of this age range, you must apply to register on both registers. If you only intend to care for children from the end of the Early Years Foundation Stage to seven years of age, you only need to register on the Childcare Register. If you only intend to care for children aged eight and over, you have the option of registering on the voluntary part of the Childcare Register. You can apply to register on the Early Years Register and on both parts of the Childcare Register, in which case only one registration fee is payable. If you wish to do this when applying to join the Early Years Register, you can tick the box on the application form, to join the other registers at the same time. Explain that you will cover fees later in the session. Pre-registration briefing for those wishing to become childminders | 9

10 When you can’t register
You cannot register if you: are the parent, step-parent or relative of the child have parental responsibility for the child are a foster parent to the child only care for children for two hours or less a day care for the child between the hours of 6pm and 2am only. The Childcare Act 2006 defines childcare and states what childcare does not include. Ofsted cannot register anyone who does not meet the definition of childcare. You can go back to slide 8 to explain the definition of childcare if necessary. Talk through who does not require registration. A relative means a grandparent, brother, sister, uncle or aunt (by full blood, half blood or affinity) or step parent. People do not have to register to look after a child in the child’s own home, or be approved in any way. However, if you intend to look after a child in the child’s own home, you can choose to register on the voluntary part of the Childcare Register. This also applies if you intend to only care for children over seven years. Tell participants that you will provide more detail about this later in the briefing. The final bullet point is there to exclude babysitting arrangements from the requirement to register. Pre-registration briefing for those wishing to become childminders | 10

11 When you can’t register
if you provide home education if you provide no more than two types of the following activities for children aged three plus and any care is incidental to these activities: school study or homework support performing arts arts and crafts sport religious, cultural or language study You cannot register if you provide home education for a child who is of compulsory school age under a home education arrangement and the care you give is incidental to the education you provide. A home education arrangement is where a child of compulsory school age receives full-time education not in a school, and is partly or wholly educated by someone who is not the child’s parent. and any care is incidental to the activities. Pre-registration briefing for those wishing to become childminders | 11

12 Registration on the Early Years Register
Explain that in this part of the briefing, you will talk about compulsory registration on the Early Years Register, under the Childcare Act 2006. Childminders on the Early Years Register are required to meet the safeguarding and welfare, and the learning and development requirements of the Early Years Foundation Stage. Pre-registration briefing for those wishing to become childminders | 12

13 The Early Years Foundation Stage
promotes teaching and learning to help prepare young children for school through setting standards that all providers must meet places a duty on providers to comply with safeguarding and welfare, and the learning and development requirements is mandatory for all schools and Ofsted-registered early years providers, who care for children aged from birth to 31 August following their fifth birthday. The overarching aim of the Early Years Foundation Stage is to ensure children are in an environment that helps children learn and develop well and are kept healthy and safe. All childminders on the Early Years Register must by law meet the safeguarding and welfare, and the learning and development requirements, which can be found in the Statutory framework for the Early Years Foundation Stage. Pre-registration briefing for those wishing to become childminders | 13

14 Safeguarding and welfare requirements
These cover: child protection suitable people staff qualifications, training, support and skills key person staff:child ratios health managing behaviour safety and suitability of premises, environment and equipment equal opportunities information and records Remind applicants that the requirements are set out in specific legal requirements. Providers must comply with all the legal requirements. Child protection covers the steps providers must take to safeguard children’s welfare. This includes having a policy and procedure in line with the relevant Local Safeguarding Children Board. Suitable people covers: the steps taken to ensure that adults looking after children, or having unsupervised access to them, are suitable to do so. Staff qualification, training, support and skills covers the arrangements providers must put in place to ensure that anyone cares for children (including themselves) have appropriate training and experience. For childminders, this includes pre-registration training in the Early Years Foundation Stage and first aid. Key person covers the relationship that children make with adults caring for them. For childminders the key person may be an assistant. Staff:child ratios covers the maximum number of children a childminder can have and explains the exceptions to these in certain circumstances. Health covers the policy and procedure for children with infectious diseases and the administration of medicines. Managing behaviour covers the policy and procedure for managing children’s behaviour and makes corporal punishment to a child an offence. Safety and suitability of premises, environment and equipment covers the safety and suitability of outdoor (including outings) and indoor spaces, furniture, equipment and toys, provides the space requirements and requires a policy and procedure about the management of risk. Equal opportunities covers the policy and procedure to promote equality of opportunity for children including the provision for children with special educational needs or disabilities. Information and records covers the type of information providers must share with parents and carers, other professionals, the police, social services and Ofsted. Childminders must keep a record of any complaints received and their outcome. It also requires providers to tell Ofsted about certain things. Pre-registration briefing for those wishing to become childminders | 14

15 Learning and development requirements
These cover: the early learning goals – knowledge, skills and understanding that young children should achieve by the end of the Reception year in which they reach the age of five the educational programmes – matters, skills and processes that are required to be taught to young children the assessment arrangements – arrangements for assessing young children to ascertain their achievements. As with the safeguarding and welfare requirements, all childminders must meet the learning and development requirements. The Early Years Foundation Stage promotes teaching and learning through a play-based framework. Childminders must provide children with a broad range of knowledge and skills through a balance of adult-led and child-initiated activities. The early learning goals cover seven areas separated into three prime areas and four specific areas. The prime areas are: communication and language physical development personal, social and emotional development The specific areas are: literacy mathematics understanding the world expressive arts and design. All of the areas of learning can be covered in every day activities, for example, sorting laundry into different colours, visiting the market to buy food for lunch and taking a walk in the park to observe changes to the trees in autumn. The guide Development matters in the Early Years Foundation Stage and supporting resources will help you to meet the requirements in a way that is suited to the home environment and children’s individual needs. Ofsted will use this guide when carrying out a registration visit and at inspection. You must carry out a progress check on each child between the ages of two and three if you are the child’s main practitioner. You should carry out ongoing sensitive observational assessments of children and use this information to help them make progress in their learning. Observations of children taking part in every day activities are the most appropriate. Pre-registration briefing for those wishing to become childminders | 15

16 How do I apply to register?
You can apply online through the Ofsted Online website: https://online.ofsted.gov.uk/OnlineOfsted/default.aspx. You need a copy of the Statutory Framework for the Early Years Foundation Stage. Tell participants that if they only wish to register on the compulsory and/or voluntary parts of the Childcare Register, the process that you are about to cover is not applicable to them. You will cover this later in the presentation. It is important that you familiarise yourself with the Statutory framework for the Early Years Foundation Stage. At the time of the registration visit, you must demonstrate to the inspector how you intend to meet the legal requirements. This includes how you will plan and provide activities that are appropriate to each child’s stage of development as they progress towards the early learning goals. The easiest way to apply is online by following the instructions on the Ofsted website using the link: https://online.ofsted.gov.uk/OnlineOfsted/default.aspx. You should first read The Guide to registration, which gives information about the whole registration process. You should be able to find all the necessary details about the process in the booklet. If you require any guidance regarding the application process please refer to the Ofsted website in the first instance. If you are still unsure, then you may contact Ofsted on Pre-registration briefing for those wishing to become childminders | 16

17 How does Ofsted register applicants?
Carries out checks on and interviews applicants to make sure they are suitable for registration Carries out checks on others associated with an application to make sure they are suitable to work or be in contact with children Visits the applicant to check their understanding of the requirements of registration including how to assess any risks to children and how to help children make progress in their learning and development. Ofsted carries out a series of checks to make sure people are suitable to work or be in contact with young children. Certain matters disqualify a person from registering. These include offences involving children, certain offences involving adults, orders removing children from your care and previously refused or cancelled registrations. If someone who lives with you is disqualified, or lives in the household where you intend to provide childminding, this also means that you cannot register. If you are on the list of barred persons held by the Disclosure and Barring Service, then you will not be able to apply to Ofsted to register as a childminder unless your barred status changes. If you have concerns about whether you or someone you live with are disqualified, you may talk in confidence to Ofsted before submitting an application, by telephoning the helpline If you are disqualified but can explain why you believe your disqualification should be lifted you may apply to Ofsted to have disqualification waived. This includes circumstances where anyone who lives with you is disqualified. Ofsted cannot waive your disqualification if you are on the list of persons barred from working with children, held by the Disclosure and Barring Service. Other matters may bring into doubt a person’s suitability, for example, information from local authority children’s services departments or about a person’s health. Reassure participants that past offences or health problems do not necessarily prevent them from being registered. Each case is considered individually. Where Ofsted has concerns, individuals are normally interviewed. This includes concerns about other household members. If Ofsted refuses registration because you, someone connected with your application or your premises are not suitable, you have rights of objection and appeal against the decision. During the visit the inspector will discuss any issues with you from the results of any checks. You will have completed your childminding training before the inspector visits you. This training should help you provide sufficient evidence to the inspector that you know and understand the requirements you will need to meet in order to be registered. You will be expected to have read and understood the EYFS and know how to put what you have learnt into practice. For example, you will need to show the inspector how you have reduced the risks in your home. Pre-registration briefing for those wishing to become childminders | 17

18 What must I do to register?
You must: be familiar with the Early Years Foundation Stage before applying complete an online form, including: your consent for Ofsted to carry out checks a declaration of anything that might prevent you from caring for children. Make sure all participants know how to get an application pack, the Early Years Foundation Stage and the guidance. As said earlier, you should not apply unless you believe you can meet the requirements of the Early Years Foundation Stage. You may withdraw your application at any time in the process, unless Ofsted has already issued a notice of intention to refuse registration. However, the registration fee is not refundable. The registration process takes some time to complete. Ofsted aims to process applications within 12 weeks, but delays in obtaining some of the checks can slow down the process. Establishing someone’s suitability through checking them is an important step to protect children. The application form asks for details about you and other persons who live or work on the premises where you want to childmind. It also asks for a declaration about your suitability and for your consent to carry out a series of checks. Pre-registration briefing for those wishing to become childminders | 18

19 What must I do to register? - DBS checks
You must: make sure each person connected with your application completes a Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) application form via make sure that each person arranges to have their identity documents checked, as set out in the guidance on Capita's website each person connected with your application must have received their completed DBS check prior to applying to Ofsted. You can not apply without one. The check on a person’s criminal record is done through the Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) via Capita. All DBS checks will now be processed online through the Capita website (http://ofsteddbsapplication.co.uk). You must make sure that you and everyone associated with your application applies for an enhanced disclosure from the Disclosure and Barring Service. Each person who does not have a disclosure must complete a Disclosure and Barring Service check. Childminders and home childcarers are now required to pay for their Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) check, which the government currently sets at £44. In addition, Capita will charge a handling fee for the application. This cost will vary depending on how the applicant chooses to apply – full details are available on the Capita website (http://ofsteddbsapplication.co.uk). When the Ofsted inspector visits you to discuss your application, he or she will also need to see some evidence of your identity, in order to confirm that you are the person who has applied for registration and to be sure that you have given Ofsted all the relevant details; for example, about any changes to your name. Ofsted will not accept your application until you have a Disclosure and Barring Service check for every person named in your application, including all members of your household who are aged 16 or over. Pre-registration briefing for those wishing to become childminders | 19

20 What must I do to register?
You must: complete a Health declaration booklet and take it to your GP prior to submitting your online application to Ofsted hold a paediatric first aid certificate before registration complete childminding training before registration Submit your completed online application form The Health declaration booklet asks for details about your past and current health. You need to complete Part 1 of the booklet, and then take the booklet to your GP. He or she will complete Part 2 and send the form back to Ofsted. The GP may charge a fee for completing the form. You must pay the fee directly to your GP. It is important to fill in the application form and Health declaration booklet as accurately and fully as possible. Failure to declare important information may lead to delays in registration, refusal of registration or, in rare cases, prosecution as it is an offence to give false or misleading information in an application. Your local authority will give you information about training courses, including first aid training and childminding (include details if known). You must hold a current paediatric first aid certificate and have completed a local authority approved training course before Ofsted can approve your registration. You may only submit an application to Ofsted if you have already completed the required training, or will do so within no later than 8 weeks. Pre-registration briefing for those wishing to become childminders | 20

21 What must I do to register?
Other persons aged 16 and over: who live and work on the premises where childminding takes place or who will work with you caring for children must complete an EY2 declaration and consent using their own Government Gateway account All other persons aged 16 or over who live or work on the premises where you intend to childmind also need to be suitable to be in regular contact with young children. This includes any person who may work with you caring for children, such as an assistant. All of these people must complete a declaration and consent form (EY2). This gives Ofsted details about them and permission to check their suitability. The EY2 form can be found via the Ofsted webiste and should be complete online, each person will need to use their own Government Gateway account Other people associated with the application do not have to complete any other form, such as a Health declaration booklet at this stage. Ofsted will tell them if more checks are required. Pre-registration briefing for those wishing to become childminders | 21

22 What happens next? Ofsted will:
acknowledge receipt of your application form tell you how to pay your application fee On receiving the application form, Ofsted acknowledges its receipt. Ofsted will return the form to you if certain parts are incomplete, for example, if you have not signed the declaration and consent. Ofsted may also telephone you to supply extra information if necessary. You must pay a fee to apply for registration. This is £35 from September Ofsted sends you details how to pay this on receipt of the application or you can pay online. This fee is not refundable if you withdraw your application, or if registration is refused. Each person connected with your application aged 16 and over must obtain an enhanced disclosure from the Disclosure and Barring Service, unless they already hold one. Ofsted will send you separate instructions about how to organise Disclosure and Barring Service checks with the acknowledgement of the application. Before the visit, the inspector will telephone you to confirm the date of the visit and make sure you have all the necessary documents to hand as set out in the Early Years Foundation Stage. Ofsted has also produced a booklet, Preparing for your registration visit, to help you . It should not be necessary for the inspector to make more than one visit to complete the registration process. Pre-registration briefing for those wishing to become childminders | 22

23 The registration visit
The inspector will check: your understanding of any risks to children on your premises, to ensure that you know they how to keep your home safe and suitable for childminding your understanding of the Early Years Foundation Stage you are ready to begin caring for children and helping them to learn and develop from the point of registration. An inspector will visit you once all the checks on you and the other peoples associated with your application are complete and you have completed both the first aid and childminding training courses. This is normally from about seven weeks after Ofsted has received all the necessary information. The inspector will telephone you first to arrange a time and to go through the documents you will need to have to hand during the visit. You must be well prepared for the visit so that you can demonstrate to the inspector how you intend to meet the Early years Foundation Stage safeguarding and welfare and the learning and development requirements. It is up to you to show the inspector that you have sufficient knowledge to care for children and help them to learn by following the requirements set out in the Early Years Foundation Stage. Ofsted will refuse registration at this stage if you cannot demonstrate how you will meet the requirements. The inspector will go through the safeguarding and welfare and the learning and development requirements and ask you questions about how you intend to meet them. As part of discussion, the inspector will ask you questions about your health and lifestyle to make sure you are mentally and physically suitable to care for children. The inspector will discuss any issues arising from the checks Ofsted carries out. Pre-registration briefing for those wishing to become childminders | 23

24 The registration visit
The inspector will check: your identity your understanding of the number of children you may care for other relevant documents, such as qualifications, first aid certificate, childminding training and documents relating to your car if you intend to transport children. The numbers of children are covered in detail later. The sorts of documents you need to have available are: identification documents including photographic identification such as a passport MOT and car insurance if you intend to transport children by car relevant qualifications, such as first aid, and pre-registration training. Pre-registration briefing for those wishing to become childminders | 24

25 How many children can I care for?
You can care for up to six children aged under eight. Of these: no more than three children may be aged from birth to 31 August following their fifth birthday normally no more than one child may be aged under 12 months. Go through the numbers of children. You cannot care for more than six children aged under eight, unless you are working with an assistant or another registered childminder. This number includes your own children and any other children for whom you are responsible while you childmind: for example foster children or grandchildren. The numbers are set out in the Statutory framework for the Early Years Foundation Stage in sections 3.39 to 3.41. Pre-registration briefing for those wishing to become childminders | 25

26 How many children can I care for?
In certain circumstances childminders may: care for more than one child aged under 12 months care for more than three children in the early years age group. Exceptions to these ratios can sometimes be made for siblings, babies and to promote continuity of care in certain circumstances, in the case of baby twins, you may care for two children under the age of one. However, you must be able to demonstrate to parents and to Ofsted that you can meet the individual needs of all the children being cared for. In all cases, the total number of children under the age of eight years must not exceed six. These are exceptions to the norm that apply to particular children at particular times. It is not expected that childminders adjust their numbers at all times to care for more children in the early years age group. Ofsted has a factsheet that helps you understand the circumstances in which you might do this - The numbers and ages of children. Pre-registration briefing for those wishing to become childminders | 26

27 How many children can I care for?
Please note: care provided for children aged eight and over is not allowed to affect adversely the care provided for children aged under eight if you employ an assistant or work with another childminder you may care for additional children childminding assistants can only care for children on their own for no more than two hours a day If you look after older children, or have your own children aged eight or over, then you will need to show the inspector how you manage the arrangements for their care. In particular you will need to make sure that you show how any care provided for older children affects the number of younger children you might care for. Childminders may also look after additional children if they employ an assistant or work with another childminder but childminders are expected to supervise assistants. If you want an assistant to look after children on their own they can only do so for a maximum of two hours in a single day. If assistants care for children for longer than two hours in a single day they must be registered as childminders in their own right. Pre-registration briefing for those wishing to become childminders | 27

28 How many children can I care for?
Other factors affecting the number of children for whom you may provide care include: space available your own children and any others for whom you are responsible, such as relatives’ children children that you care for who are aged four and five and who only attend childminding before or after a school day and in the school holidays may be counted as being older than the early years age group. However, other factors may also affect maximum numbers. These include: Space – the space requirements are set out in the Statutory framework for the Early Years Foundation Stage. Other agencies also may have a view on whether your premises are suitable for childminding, such as your local authority planning department (particularly if you want to work with an assistant), fire safety and environmental health departments. Children aged four and five who therefore only attend the childminding setting before and after school and/or during school holidays can be counted as aged five for the purpose of calculating ratios. This means if any children you are caring for, including your own children, fall into this category you may still care for up to three additional children in the early years age group. Pre-registration briefing for those wishing to become childminders | 28

29 After the visit Ofsted confirms:
whether you are suitable to be registered whether there needs to be any conditions or restrictions placed on your registration whether others connected with your application are suitable to work or be in regular contact with children. Ofsted will not normally impose any conditions on your certificate at the point of registration. If, however, there are particular circumstances that warrant a condition being placed on your certificate the inspector will discuss this with you at the end of the visit. Such conditions might include a restriction on the ages you can care for due to health implications. Ofsted continues the checking process until it is satisfied that all people connected with a registration are suitable to work or be in contact with young children. Pre-registration briefing for those wishing to become childminders | 29

30 After the visit When all checks are complete Ofsted sends you either:
a letter granting registration and your certificate of registration setting out any conditions of registration or a notice of its intention to refuse registration. When all checks are complete, Ofsted either grants registration or sends notice of intention to refuse registration. If registration is refused, you will be sent details of how to object to Ofsted’s intention to refuse, and your rights of appeal. The certificate is the final stage in the registration process. You cannot begin work as a childminder until you receive the certificate. It sets out any conditions that apply to your registration. All registered childminders must comply with conditions at all times. It is an offence not to do so. You must display the certificate of registration and show it to parents on request. Pre-registration briefing for those wishing to become childminders | 30

31 After registration Ofsted will:
publish your name, address and telephone number on its website, with your consent inspect you at regular intervals and publish your inspection report on its website As part of your application you have the option to give Ofsted consent to publish your name, address and telephone number on their website. This will allow you to publicise your services to any prospective parents who may be looking for childcare in your area to contact you through the Ofsted website. If you do not do so at the point of applying you may choose to do so at any time by completing a short consent form, which you can do online or post back to Ofsted. All the details on how to do this and a short Q&A are available on the Ofsted website. You may also withdraw your consent at any time. After registration Ofsted usually carries out a first inspection within seven months of registration providing a childminder is caring for children. As part of its inspection process, Ofsted asks providers to complete a self-evaluation form. This is not compulsory, but it is a very useful tool to help providers review and improve their provision, so that it is of the highest standard and offers the best experience for young children. After this first inspection Ofsted will inspect at least once in every three/four-year period. Ofsted inspects more frequently in certain circumstances, for example, as a result of concerns raised with Ofsted by parents. After each inspection Ofsted publishes the report on its website alongside other information about each provider. Pre-registration briefing for those wishing to become childminders | 31

32 After registration You must pay an annual fee to remain registered. You can pay your fee by any of the following methods: Direct Debit telephone bank giro transcash post home or online banking. The fee for continued registration is £35 a year from September 2012. Ofsted will provide applicants with full details of payment methods. Pre-registration briefing for those wishing to become childminders | 32

33 The Childcare Register
Compulsory and voluntary registration on the Childcare Register Explain that you will now talk about registration on the compulsory and voluntary parts of the Childcare Register. Pre-registration briefing for those wishing to become childminders | 33

34 The compulsory part of the Childcare Register
You must register on the compulsory part of the Childcare Register if you intend to care for children aged five to seven years. Remind participants that they must apply to register on the Childcare Register if they intend to care for children aged five to seven years, unless they are exempt from registration. Remind participants that exemptions were covered at the beginning of the briefing and refer back to these slides if necessary. Pre-registration briefing for those wishing to become childminders | 34

35 The voluntary part of the Childcare Register
You have the choice of registering on the voluntary part of the Childcare Register if: you intend to care only for children over seven years in your own home you are a home childcarer or a nanny caring for children from birth to 17 years one or more exemptions apply; for example, with regard to activity-based provision. The voluntary part of the Childcare Register offers the choice of registration to providers who are not eligible for compulsory registration. By joining the voluntary part of the register, providers show parents who use their services that they: meet certain requirements relating to people, premises and provision designed to safeguard children are monitored through inspections carried out by Ofsted on a random basis or when parents have concerns about the care. Parents who use registered childcarers may be eligible to claim the childcare element of working tax credits. Pre-registration briefing for those wishing to become childminders | 35

36 How do I apply to register?
You can apply on the compulsory and/or voluntary part of the Childcare Register: on the Ofsted website (www.ofsted.gov.uk) Explain that the process for joining either register is the same. Run through the different ways of making an application. Emphasise that where possible, applications should be made online. Stress that participants do not need to make a separate application if they applying to be on the Early Years Register. Pre-registration briefing for those wishing to become childminders | 36

37 How do I apply to register?
You need to: pay an application fee sign a declaration confirming that you will meet all requirements of the register when you start to care for children produce a valid first aid certificate have completed a local authority approved childminding training course for the compulsory part of the Childcare Register. If you apply to register, you will need to pay a non-refundable application fee, which is set by the government. This is £103 for childminders and home childcarers. You must also pay an annual fee for continued registration. This is currently £103. The amount of this fee is set each year. These fees are not relevant if you are applying to go on the Early Years Register, in which case the fee for all registers is £35. You will need to arrange a check of your identity, first aid qualification and any other required information. Ofsted uses an external partner called HR Assurance Services to check your identity so that you can obtain a Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) check. Ofsted will provide you with details of how to get your identity checked when you apply to register. You will also be required to send your first aid certificate to Ofsted and evidence of completion of the childminder training course. Pre-registration briefing for those wishing to become childminders | 37

38 What happens next? Ofsted will not carry out a registration visit but may carry out any additional checks and interviews needed to establish suitability if there are concerns. Ofsted sends out the certificate of registration once the process is complete. Ofsted will not normally carry out a visit to the premises before granting your application for registration, unless you are also applying to join the Early Years Register. It will assess your suitability by considering the information on your application form and your Disclosure and Barring Service disclosure. It may be necessary in some circumstances to interview you or carry out further checks. For example, if you have lived aboard during the past three years, you will normally have to provide some extra evidence of your suitability, such as a certificate of good conduct from the embassy of the country in which you have lived. When the registration process is complete, Ofsted will issue a certificate. This is your proof that you are registered on the compulsory and/or voluntary part of the Childcare Register. Once you are registered you must continue to meet the requirements relating to people, premises and provision that you confirmed on your application form. You can access these requirements from the Ofsted website. Pre-registration briefing for those wishing to become childminders | 38

39 After registration Ofsted will inspect if a parent or other person has concerns about your childcare provision. Ofsted will also select some providers at random for an inspection. You will not receive a report for these inspections. Instead Ofsted will send you a letter informing you whether your provision meets requirements. Once you are registered, Ofsted may inspect you at any time while your registration is current. Ofsted will inspect a random selection of all those on the Childcare Register and will always inspect if it receives a concern about your childcare provision that relates to the requirements of registration or any conditions imposed on your registration. If you are also registered on the Early Years Register, Ofsted will check that you are complying with the requirements of the Childcare Register when it carries out your Early Years Foundation Stage inspection. Ofsted will inspect with little notice and you should be ready for inspection at all times by meeting the requirements that govern continued registration. An inspector may visit your provision to check compliance against the requirements and will give you feedback on the outcome of the inspection. If you have not met one or more of the requirements the inspector will tell you what needs to be put right and will explain what happens next. Following any inspection you will either receive a letter confirming that you were meeting your requirements for registration or a letter detailing what must done in order to remain registered. Whatever the outcome Ofsted will publish this letter on its website. However, if you are also on the Early Years Register, your inspection report will confirm whether you are meeting the requirements of the Childcare Register. Pre-registration briefing for those wishing to become childminders | 39

40 Conclusion Childminding is very important work.
You must show Ofsted how you intend to meet the Early Years Foundation Stage requirements and promote good outcomes for children. If you intend to register on the compulsory and/or voluntary parts of the Childcare Register, you must agree to meet the requirements. Ofsted works closely with local authorities, which will provide you with help, support and training. Go through concluding remarks and make sure that everyone has the relevant documents to apply. Pre-registration briefing for those wishing to become childminders | 40


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