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What Youth Need to Succeed

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Presentation on theme: "What Youth Need to Succeed"— Presentation transcript:

1 What Youth Need to Succeed
Working together to build assets

2 OVERVIEW What is the Search Institute? What are Developmental Assets?
Why are assets important?

3 SEARCH INSTITUTE Non-profit organization
Mission is to provide leadership, knowledge, and resources to promote healthy children, youth, and communities. 40 Developmental Assets – qualities that young people need to grow up healthy, caring, and responsible.

4 DEVELOPMENTAL ASSETS Problem-centered approach Asset-building approach
Anticipates the worst Concentrates on kids at risk or in trouble Reacts to problems after they happen Stresses competition Asset-building approach Brings out the best Benefits all children and teens Builds character, skills, and values that help prevent problems Stresses cooperation and collaboration In the past youth development has focused on problem centered approaches to helping youth. These approaches anticipate that the worst will happen to youth, especially those “at risk”. It reacts to problems after they happen ad stresses competition between organizations and service providers. The asset-building approach in contrast looks for the best in youth and focuses its efforts on all youth regardless of whether they are labeled “at risk.” It is concerned with preventing problems not fixing them and it stresses cooperation between organizations, families, and communities because it recognized that asset building is a cooperative effort between parents, youth, teachers, leaders, neighbors, and all community members.

5 DEVELOPMENTAL ASSETS Divided into 8 areas of human development Support
Empowerment Boundaries and expectations Constructive use of time Commitment to learning Positive values Social competencies Positive Identity In the past youth development has focused on problem centered approaches to helping youth. These approaches anticipate that the worst will happen to youth, especially those “at risk”. It reacts to problems after they happen ad stresses competition between organizations and service providers. The asset-building approach in contrast looks for the best in youth and focuses its efforts on all youth regardless of whether they are labeled “at risk.” It is concerned with preventing problems not fixing them and it stresses cooperation between organizations, families, and communities because it recognized that asset building is a cooperative effort between parents, youth, teachers, leaders, neighbors, and all community members.

6 The Support Assets Asset 1: Family Support
Asset 2: Positive Family Communication Asset 3: Other Adult Relationships Asset 4: Caring Neighborhood Asset 5: Caring School Climate Asset 6: Parent Involvement in Schooling To grow and thrive, youth need supportive adults and supportive environments.

7 Asset 1: Family Support Youth need love, comfort, encouragement, and support from their families. 70% of youth say they have this asset in their life Parents should be consistent and positive while responding to children’s needs. Children who form strong bonds with warm, responsive caregivers cope with difficult times more easily than children who don’t have this connection. Supported children are also more curious, get along better with other children, and perform better in school.

8 Asset 2: Positive Family Communication
Parents communicate with children in positive ways and respect and respond to their needs. 30% of youth say they have this asset in their life. As children learn to talk, they are comfortable asking their parents for help and advice.

9 Asset 3: Other Adult Relationships
All youth receive love and comfort from at least one adult other than their parents. 45% of youth say they have this asset in their life. Parents and children have support from individuals outside the home. This support can come from adult family members, friends, teachers, youth group leaders and neighbors.

10 Asset 4: Caring Neighborhood
Youth have neighbors who care for and about them. 40% of youth say they have this asset in their life. Neighbors look out for each other. Adults in the neighborhood know children’s names and talk with the children. The neighborhood provides safe places for children to play.

11 Asset 5: Caring Out-of-Home Climate
Youth spend time in encouraging, caring environments outside the home. 29% of youth say they have this asset in their life. These environments include schools, youth organizations, care givers, and any other extra curricular activities

12 Asset 6: Parent Involvement in School
Parents talk about their children’s needs with caregivers and teachers, and help their children succeed outside the home. 34% of youth say they have this asset in their life. Parents take a proactive role in working with teachers, caregivers, and youth leaders to ensure that their child succeeds. Parents involvement matters!

13 The Empowerment Assets
Asset 7: Community Values Youth Asset 8: Youth as Resources Asset 9: Service to Others Asset 10: Safety To feel that they’re important and they belong, young children need safe and caring communities, schools, neighborhoods, and families surrounding them.

14 Asset 7: Community Values Youth
Parents and other adults in the community value and appreciate young people. 25% of youth say they have this asset in their life. Adults in the community listen to what youth have to say. The community provides activities and outlets for youth. Youth are welcome at community meetings and events. Children should be seen, heard, and taken seriously.

15 Asset 8: Youth Are Given Useful Roles
Youth are included in age-appropriate family tasks and are given useful roles in the community. 28% of youth say they have this asset in their life. Youth have useful roles at home and in the community. They have a voice in family decisions as well as having a voice in the community. Youth have jobs at home that contribute to the family well being. Schools take the advice of the student council and listen to student concerns. Youth are invited to be members of community boards.

16 Asset 9: Service To Others
Together, parents and children serve others in the community. 51% of youth say they have this asset in their life. Youth provide one or more hours per week of service to their communities. Families volunteer together in their community.

17 Asset 10: Safety Homes, schools, childcare settings, and other environments are safe for children. 51% of youth say they have this asset in their life. Parents, teachers and other adults have talked to youth about safety and how to protect themselves and respond in emergency situations. Youth know what the safety and disaster plans are for their home, their school, and their community. Firearms in their home and the homes of their friends are safely stored and have trigger locks – parents talk to each other about this. The neighborhood takes crime seriously and watches out for each other.

18 The Boundaries and Expectations Assets
Asset 11: Family Boundaries Asset 12: School Boundaries Asset 13: Neighborhood Boundaries Asset 14: Adult Role Models Asset 15: Positive Peer Influence Asset 16: High Expectations Knowing what’s expected of them – and what’s not – helps children create, learn, and grow. Limits help youth fell safe and secure, they help children know you care and take an active role in their well-being.

19 Asset 11: Family Boundaries
Parents understand children’s needs and preferences, model appropriate behavior, and set age-appropriate limits and consequences. 48% of youth say they have this asset in their life. Families have rules. Parents have expectations and set consequences and follow through on these consequences. Without boundaries there is chaos.

20 Asset 12: Out-of-Home Boundaries
Out-of-home environments provide age-appropriate activities and have clear rules and consequences. 53% of youth say they have this asset in their life. Parents, youth, and teachers know the rules and consequences and work together to make sure they are followed. Schools hold children accountable for their behavior.

21 Asset 13: Neighborhood Boundaries
Neighbors take responsibility for monitoring and supervising children’s behavior outside the home. 49% of youth say they have this asset in their life. Neighbors expect youth to follow rules for safety and good conduct in the neighborhood. Adults hold youth accountable for following the rules and talk to youth and their parents when rules are not followed.

22 Asset 14: Adult Role Models
Parents and other adults model responsible, positive behavior to youth. Youth have at least 3 adult role models in their life. 30% of youth say they have this asset in their life. Youth have at least 3 people, other than their parents that model responsible behavior.

23 Asset 15: Positive Peer Interaction & Influence
Children’s friends model responsible behavior. They do well in school and stay away from risky behaviors. 65% of youth say they have this asset in their life. As children grow, they spend time with friends who act in responsible ways.

24 Asset 16: Appropriate Expectations for Growth
Adults have realistic expectations for children’s development. 49% of youth say they have this asset in their life. Adults encourage children to do their best and develop their unique talents. Children are encouraged to develop at their own pace.

25 The Constructive Use of Time Assets
Asset 17: Creative Activities Asset 18: Youth Programs Asset 19: Religious Community Asset 20: Time at Home With encouragement and support from parents and other caring people, children can enjoy fun, meaningful activities that help them become caring, creative, confident adults.

26 Asset 17: Creative Activities
Adults expose all youth to music, art, or other creative activities. As they mature, children begin to participate in these activities regularly. 20% of youth say they have this asset in their life.

27 Asset 18: Out-of-Home Activities
Children spend one hour or more each week in extra curricular school activities or structured community programs. 58% of youth say they have this asset in their life. Youth regularly participate in sports, clubs, Scouts, or other community programs. Children spend one hour or more each week in extra curricular school activities or structured community programs.

28 Asset 19: Religious Community
Parents make religious programs a regular part of family life. 63% of youth say they have this asset in their life. The family/youth attends religious services/programs regularly.

29 Asset 20: Positive, Supervised Time At Home
Children spend most evenings and weekends together at home in predictable, enjoyable routines. 52% of youth say they have this asset in their life. Families eat dinner together most nights. Do homework, play games, watch movies, work in the yard, or do some other activity that the family enjoys.

30 The Commitment To Learning Assets
Asset 21: Achievement Motivation Asset 22: School Engagement Asset 23: Homework Asset 24: Bonding to School Asset 25: Reading for Pleasure Infants are born curious and ready to learn. To keep this excitement and involvement growing, adults need to understand children’s development and choose fun and appropriate activities for them. When something catches a child’s attention, caring adults can nurture that interest and find ways to help the child learn more.

31 Asset 21: Achievement Motivation
Children are motivated to do well in school and other activities. 67% of youth say they have this asset in their life. As children grow, they want to do well in school and other activities. Parents and teachers instill in youth the desire to “do their best.”

32 Asset 22: Children Are Engaged in Learning
Youth are responsive, attentive, and involved in learning new things. 61% of youth say they have this asset in their life. Youth like learning new things and find it fun and fascinating. They are inspired by the adults around them to learn more.

33 Asset 23: Stimulating Activity and Homework
Parents, caregivers, and teachers encourage children to explore and engage in stimulating activities. 53% of youth say they have this asset in their life. Children do homework when it’s assigned. Parents other adults take children to museums, art galleries, and other age-appropriate educational venues that will help stimulate their imaginations.

34 Asset 24: Enjoyment of Learning and Bonding to School
Youth enjoy learning and care about their school. 54% of youth say they have this asset in their life. Parents and other adults model their enjoyment of learning and find engaging learning activities for children.

35 Asset 25: Reading for Pleasure
Parents and other adults read with children, make reading fun, and encourage participation. 23% of youth say they have this asset in their life. Preschool and elementary-age children should read with adults at least 30 minutes each day and also enjoy reading on their own. Children enjoy reading or looking through books on their own. Parent model reading for pleasure to their children.

36 The Positive Values Assets
Asset 26: Caring Asset 27: Equality & Social Justice Asset 28: Integrity Asset 29: Honesty Asset 30: Responsibility Asset 31: Restraint Values are the important internal compasses that guide children to make decisions and set priorities.

37 Asset 26: Caring Youth are encouraged to help other people.
50% of youth say they have this asset in their life. As children mature, they learn and are encouraged to help others.

38 Asset 27: Equality & Social Justice
Youth work to make their community a better place. 52% of youth say they have this asset in their life. Parents and other adults demonstrate ways to demonstrate equality and tolerance.

39 Asset 28: Integrity Youth act on their convictions and stand up for their beliefs. 68% of youth say they have this asset in their life. Families back youth up and set good examples for standing up for what they believe in.

40 Asset 29: Honesty Youth value honesty and act accordingly.
67% of youth say they have this asset in their life. Adults in their life model honesty and deal with youth in an honest and sincere way. Youth make the most honest, not the easiest decisions.

41 Asset 30: Responsibility
Children accept and take responsibility for their decisions and actions. 63% of youth say they have this asset in their life. Parents and other adults model personal responsibility. Children learn that actions affect others. Children learn from the consequences of their decisions.

42 Asset 31: Healthy Lifestyle
Children learn to take care of their bodies, which includes developing healthy sexual attitudes and respect for others. 47% of youth say they have this asset in their life. Children learn to take care of their bodies, which includes developing healthy sexual attitudes.

43 The Social Competencies Assets
Asset 32: Planning & Decision Making Asset 33: Interpersonal Competence Asset 34: Cultural Competence Asset 35: Resistance Skills Asset 36: Peaceful Conflict Resolution Children learn how to act from observing the people around them. As children grow older, they’re able to apply the skills they’ve seen others use and begin to handle social situations on their own. When they’re socially competent, children can cope with the many choices, challenges, and opportunities they face in life.

44 Asset 32: Planning and Decision Making
Children learn how to plan ahead and make choices at appropriate developmental levels. 30% of youth say they have this asset in their life. Parents and other adults help children learn how to make appropriate choices.

45 Asset 33: Interpersonal Skills
Youth interact with adults and peers and can make friends. Children express feelings in appropriate ways. 47% of youth say they have this asset in their life. Parents and other adults help children to express their feelings in appropriate ways and learn to respect the feelings of others.

46 Asset 34: Cultural Competence
Children know and are comfortable with people of different cultural, racial, and/or ethnic backgrounds. 42% of youth say they have this asset in their life. Parents and teachers encourage learning about other cultures and model behaviors that show sensitivity to differences.

47 Asset 35: Resistance Skills
Youth develop the ability to resist negative peer pressure and dangerous situations. 42% of youth say they have this asset in their life. Parents and other adults model resistance skills and help children learn to make careful choices and avoid dangerous situations. As children mature, they learn to resist negative peer pressure.

48 Asset 36: Peaceful Conflict Resolution
Youth resolve problems non - violently. 45% of youth say they have this asset in their life. Parents and other adults model and help children learn how to cope with frustrations and resolve conflicts nonviolently.

49 The Positive Identity Assets
Asset 37: Personal Power Asset 38: Self-Esteem Asset 39: Sense of Purpose Asset 40: Positive View-Personal Future Caring adults can sow the seeds of positive identity as soon as a child enters the world. While children grow, their sense of self needs to be cultivated and nurtured so they can learn who they are and what they can do. Adults around them can challenge, support, and guide children as they move through childhood and are on their way to becoming confident adolescents and adults.

50 Asset 37: Personal Power Children learn that they can influence their surroundings and have control over things that happen to them. 44% of youth say they have this asset in their life. Youth manage frustrations and challenges in ways that have positive results. Parents and other adults model coping skills, demonstrating healthy ways to deal with frustrations and challenges Children learn that they can influence their surroundings and have control over things that happen to them.

51 Children report having high self-esteem.
Asset 38: Self-Esteem Children report having high self-esteem. 52% of youth say they have this asset in their life. Adults and other adults model high self-esteem and give children appropriate positive feedback. Children learn to feel good about themselves.

52 Asset 39: Sense of Purpose
Youth feel their lives have purpose and actively engage their skills. 59% of youth say they have this asset in their life. Parents and other adults feel and show that their lives have purpose. Children are curious and interested in exploring the world around them. As children grow, they feel that their life has purpose.

53 Asset 40: Positive View of Personal Future
Youth are hopeful and positive about their future. 74% of youth say they have this asset in their life. They have plans, goals, and dreams that they believe can be realized. Parents and other adults work to create a positive future for themselves and their children.

54 The More Assets Young People Have, The More Likely They Are To:
Succeed in school by getting mostly A’s Help friends or neighbors for at least one hour per week Value getting to know people of many racial/ethnic groups Be a leader of a group in the past year Everyone can build assets in themselves and in others. Relationships are essential to building these assets and it is an ongoing process. Building assets requires consistent messages, duplication, and repetition. The more assets young people have the more likely they are to:

55 The More Assets Young People Have, The More Likely They Are To:
Pay attention to healthy nutrition and exercise Avoid doing dangerous things Save money instead of spending it right away Refuse to give up when things get difficult The average 6th grader has 21.5 of the 40 developmental assets. We should aim to instill 31 of the 40 developmental assets in children. The more assets a child has in their life, the more likely they are to succeed!

56 What do you do that develops assets in youth?


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