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A 501(c)(3) non-for profit organization that was started in response to a need for political unity among.

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Presentation on theme: "A 501(c)(3) non-for profit organization that was started in response to a need for political unity among."— Presentation transcript:

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3 A 501(c)(3) non-for profit organization that was started in response to a need for political unity among Asian American students in the Midwest. Started in 1989 in Ohio By 1990, more than 20 universities in the Midwest that had formed Asian Pacific Islander American (APIA) organizations. Growing need to support APIA organizations and its students promoting leadership among students, Develops a channel of communication (network) for APIA students in the Midwest

4 First organized meeting for MAASU | October 21, 1989 | Granville, Ohio MAASU is incorporated in the state of Ohio by Charles Chang | June 27, 1990 Purdue Asian American Students/MAASU Conference | October 1990 | Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN Midwest Asian American Conference | March 1991 | University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL MAASU Conference | April 1991 | University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI MAASU ECC Retreat, Constitution established | September 1991 | University of Illinois,Urbana-Champaign, IL MAASU Leadership Retreat | October 1991 | Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN MAASU granted tax-exempt status | April 1992 MAASU Conference | April 1992 | University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL MAASU Board of Advisors Meeting | October 1992 | Chicago, IL MAASU Conference | April 1993 | The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH MAASU Leadership Retreat | October 29-31, 1993 | Northern Illinois University, Dekab, IL MAASU Spring Conference | April 8-10, 1994 | University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI MAASU Leadership Retreat | October 28-30, 1994 | Northwestern University, Evanston, IL MAASU Spring Conference | March 23-25, 1995 | University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL MAASU Leadership Retreat | November 17-19, 1995 | Notre Dame, South Bend, IN MAASU Spring Conference | April 4-7, 1996 | Indiana University, Bloomington, IN MAASU Leadership Retreat | November 8-10, 1996 | Washington University, St. Louis, MO MAASU Spring Conference | April 10-13, 1997 | Northwestern University, Evanston, IL MAASU Leadership Retreat | October 31 - November 2, 1997 | The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH MAASU Spring Conference | April 2-5, 1996 | University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI MAASU Organizational Meeting | April 10, 1999 | The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH MAASU Spring Conference | April 6-8, 2000 | University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, Minneapolis, MN MAASU Leadership Retreat | October 20-22, 2000 | Grand Valley State University, Allendale, MI MAASU Spring Conference | March 22-25, 2001 | University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI MAASU Leadership Retreat | October 10-19, 2001 | Loyola University, Chicago, IL MAASU Spring Conference | February 15-17, 2002 | University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL MAASU Leadership Retreat | November 8-10, 2002 | Ball State University, Muncle, IN MAASU Spring Conference | April 3-6, 2003 | Indiana University, Bloomington, IN MAASU Leadership Retreat | November 7-9, 2003 | Northern Illinois University, Dekab, IL MAASU Spring Conference | April 1-3, 2004 | University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI MAASU Leadership Retreat | November 5-6, 2004 | University of Missouri, Columbia, MO MAASU Spring Conference | April 1-3, 2005 | University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI MAASU Leadership Retreat | November 4-5, 2005 | Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI MAASU Spring Conference | April 1-3, 2006 | The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH MAASU Leadership Retreat | November 10-12, 2006 | Eastern Illinois University, Charleston, IL MAASU Spring Conference | March 9-11, 2007 | University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL MAASU Leadership Retreat | November, 2-4, 2007 | Denison University, Granville, OH MAASU Spring Conference | March 28-30, 2008 | University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS MAASU Leadership Retreat | November 14-16, 2008 | University of Missouri, Columbia, MO MAASU Spring Conference | April 3-5, 2009 | University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI

5 Executive director (ER) Chairperson Public relations Members outreach Secretaryadvocacy communications fundraisingprogramming Technical networking Executive coordinating committee (ECC) Board of Advisors (BOA)

6 Danielle Masuda Student Affairs Administration Graduate Assistant LBGT Resource Center Michigan State University Executive Director

7 Shane Carlin Assistant Vice Chancellor Office of Student Affairs Advancement University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Tedd Vanadilok Director Asian/Asian- American Student Affairs Northwestern University Lester Manzano Assistant Dean College of Arts and Sciences Loyola University Chicago lester.manzano lester.manzano

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9 The Midwest Asian American Students Union strives to recognize the needs of the Asian Pacific Islanders American (APIA) Community. The objects of the Midwest Asian American Students Union are: To assist schools with the establishment of APIA student organizations, APIA cultural center and/or an Asian American Studies Program To promote leadership among APIA students through programs including, but not limited to to the Leadership Retreat, Spring Conference and other various programming. To address the educational needs and rights of the APIA community and provide scholarship information for all APIA students To develop and maintain a channel of communication for APIA student organizations in the Midwest through s, bi-weekly newsletter and networking To assist and encourage all APIA students to work toward social change, by providing a forum for social consciousness To unite all communities and strengthen the APIA community's stance against all forms of oppression

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12 Current Reality Vision Purpose

13 Collaborative Leadership Leadership is a complex form of human activity that can be nurtured through appropriate learning opportunities. We view collaborative leadership as the involvement of two or more people in a group working toward a common vision or goal in a manner that reflects shared ownership, authorship, use, or responsibility. A successful collaboration takes place when participants with diverse experiences and expertise work together to solve a common problem or produce a common product. Successful collaborations are non-jurisdictional, relationship driven and sensitive to issues of inclusion and exclusion. We believe that the following core concepts are at the heart of collaborative leadership: Collaborative leadership is the intentional and skillful management of relationships that enables others to succeed individually while accomplishing a collective outcome. Collaborative leaders ably facilitate the involvement of two or more people in a group working toward a shared outcome in a manner that reflects collective ownership, authorship, use, or responsibility. Collaboration is not the outcome or goal. Collaborations are processes that, when successful, align people’s actions to accomplish a goal or solve a problem. Collaborative leaders possess knowledge, skills, and dispositions that enable them to carry out leaderful actions such as optimizing assets, seeking new solutions, sustaining focus, promoting trust, or setting and monitoring goals and progress. Managing and sustaining collaborative relationships requires leaderful actions on the part of all participants including the following: advocating for people, ideas and organizations in ways that are inclusive rather than exclusive facilitating open group discussion, problem solving and decision-making exercising sound judgment and political skills while working with multiple constituencies promoting systemic and long term vs. symptomatic and short term change seeking creative global as well as local actions and solutions sustaining ideas, trust and collaborative focus while responding to changing circumstances accepting responsibility at professional and personal levels providing the means for partners to set incremental and obtainable goals and celebrations along the way Collaborative leadership exists at varying levels and is exhibited in a variety of ways. Ultimately, though, collaborative leaders in education achieve some degree of expertise at all of the following levels: Self-directedness Classroom leadership Peer leadership School leadership Community leadership Global citizen leadership

14 More than just a fight for social justice.

15 2009 fall leadership retreat “Stay close to your roots, go far in leadership…”

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18 The Ohio State University 2010 Spring Conference 800 plus APIA (Asian Pacific Islander Americans) More workshops Greater opportunity to network Develop or enhance leadership skills

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