Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Dorothy Dolasky, Ed. D. EDConsult, LLC. 334.740.0719 1 East Central Regional Center (ECRC) Ohio.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Dorothy Dolasky, Ed. D. EDConsult, LLC. 334.740.0719 1 East Central Regional Center (ECRC) Ohio."— Presentation transcript:

1 Dorothy Dolasky, Ed. D. EDConsult, LLC East Central Regional Center (ECRC) Ohio College Tech Prep February 27, 2012 Skills for a Lifetime: Teaching Students the Habits of Success

2 Three Stories Peas Worms Airplanes 2

3 3 Introducing one of SREB’s newest Publications:

4 Who is Here Today? 4 Counselors Specialists School Administrators Action Team Coaches Instructors University Programs Superintendents Intervention Specialists CTE affiliated High School Middle School Family Advocates Outreach Directors

5 5 We work with students who are on our toes! and in our hearts.

6 Please draw a horse. Do not share your drawing. 6 Activity One:

7 Toward the Top of the Page Positive/Optimistic Able to get along well with almost anyone Friendly and have a ready smile Gullible 7

8 8 Toward the Middle of the Page Practical Realistic Always wants to know the rules Can be swayed

9 9 Toward the Bottom of the Page The “devil’s advocate” Starts sentences with “but” Short attention span Sees the glass half empty Not very gullible

10 10 Facing Left Traditional Friendly Usually have a quick wit Remember dates, including birthdays Gullible

11 11 Facing Right Innovative Highly creative and highly excitable Have new ideas and are visionaries Gullible

12 12 Facing Forward Direct Enjoy debating different ideas At ease with ideas and discussions Flirty and passionate

13 13 With Many Details Analytical Thoughtful Deliberate in Making Decisions Enjoys “pomp and circumstance”

14 A Rocking Horse Work and play are synonyms. Appreciate personalized interactions. Inspire others to reach their highest potential Get in trouble when left alone Very Gullible 14

15 15 With Few Details Enjoy taking risks Prefer action as opposed to planning Spend a great deal of time on the phone, usually listening to others Very Gullible

16 16 Section 1: Creating the right conditions to link students’ talents with successful habits. Section 2: Approaches for Teaching the Habits of Success Section 3: Lessons and activities Skills for a Lifetime: Teaching Students the Habits of Success

17 17 Section 1: Creating the right conditions to link students’ talents with successful habits. Must Focus on Talents—not deficits Talents: any recurring pattern of thought, feeling, or behavior that can boost the effectiveness of completing a task. Building Engaged Schools, Gary Gordon

18 Skills for a Lifetime: Teaching Students the Habits of Success 18 Section 2: Approaches for Teaching the Habits of Success Fort Mills, High School 101 Blackstone Valley Regional Vocational Technical High School, Career Guidance Walhalla High School, Teacher Advisement program

19 Skills for a Lifetime: Teaching Students the Habits of Success Section Three: Six theme areas: Create Relationships (Teamwork, responsibility) Study, Manage Time and Get Organized (time mgmt, keeping up w/materials, use effective study skills) Reading and Writing Across the Curriculum (Revise essays, read and write in every class) Mathematics Across the Curriculum (solve problems, estimate, predict) Set Goals and Plan for the Future (set and plan concrete goals, be accountable, make real-world connections) Accessing Resources (negotiate, research, analyze)

20 Southern Regional Education Board Shift School-wide Focus 20 Understand their talents and strengths Set future goals Experience success Connect goals and talents Understand how course-work relates to their future lives Develop skills to maximize talents

21 SREB’s Six Habits 21 Positive Relationships Work Skills Literacy Skills Mathematics Goal Setting Access

22 Common Characteristics of Ninth- Graders: Disorganized Apathetic Weak Social Skills Academic Learning Gaps High Rate of Absenteeism Weak Study Skills Discipline Problems Lack of Responsibility Apprehension Low Self-Esteem Misguided Enthusiasm 22

23 Activity “One Word Vision” 23 KnowledgeCharacteristicsSkills KnowledgeCharacterSkills/habits

24 Activity “One Word Vision” 24 KnowledgeCharacteristicsSkills KnowledgeCharacterSkills/habits Self-sufficient

25 25 Self-sufficient Able to provide for oneself without the aid of others; independent. In the final analysis it is not what you do for your children but what you have taught them to do for themselves that will make them successful human beings. -- From the "Ask Ann Landers" American advice column KnowledgeCharacteristicsSkills KnowledgeCharacterSkills/habits

26 Skills for a Lifetime: Teaching Students the Habits of Success 26 Section 2 Approaches for Teaching the Habits of Success Fort Mills, High School 101 Blackstone Valley Regional Vocational Technical High School, Career Guidance Walhalla High School, Teacher Advisement program

27 27 Unit 1: Orientation to High School — 12 days School Tour Handbook Review Life Map Team Building Activities Orientation to Technology Orientation to the Media Center Fort Mill High School High School 101 High School 101 A requirement for all freshmen

28 28 Unit 2: Learning Styles — 8 days Modalities of Learning Brain Hemispheres Howard Gardner’s Multiple Intelligences Communication Styles

29 Each Grade New Theme Grade 9: Welcome to BVT Grade 10: Becoming Your Best (Covey) Grade 11: Think Realistically Grade 12: Transitions (pp ). 29 Blackstone Valley Regional Technical High School

30 BVT--Grade Nine (Students will … ) learn to use the BVT Master Notebook and Daily Agenda. evaluate different industries within the clusters at BVT. get to know the guidance counselors and other student support. explore their interests and get to know themselves. create a foundation for a fulfilling four-year stay at BVT. develop a career portfolio that will help them prepare for a career after high school. learn to use tools to make informed decisions regarding their academic work, their career choices and personal social choices. 30

31 Walhalla High School Positive Academic Counseling for Students The Power of One The influence of one person on the success of another is an undeniable fact of life. (PACS)

32 A good teacher-adviser: Knows the student-not just the student’s work. Knows about the whole student, his or her goals and family, as well as what is happening to the student in school. Teaches the “soft skills” needed for success in education, careers and life. Connects students with the larger mission of the school and of education: preparation for life! (PACS)

33 Creating an advisement system that teaches the Habits of Success: Advisers stay with the same students throughout high school. Develop a curriculum and a calendar and stay true to both. Make the curriculum teacher friendly. Provide intensive professional development. Use teacher-leaders to facilitate curriculum development. (PACS)

34 Jigsaw Expert Groups 1.Page Criteria for Page Curriculum Outline 3.Page 84 Guidance Joins the Effort 4.Page 108 How to Develop Curriculum 5.Page Lessons Learned 34 Count off at tables 1-5 Go to expert group and read Return to home group and report

35 35 “I think it was playwright Jane Wagner who said, ‘All my life I wanted to be somebody, but I see now I should’ve been more specific.’” - Oprah

36 Skills for a Lifetime: Teaching Students the Habits of Success 36 Wearing bling Discussion at Tables Three Models

37 Southern Regional Education Board First Assessment 1.What is one key word to describe a graduating senior? 2.Who is the most important person to a student? 3.What habit is the most important? 37

38 The 2 nd Habit: Organize, manage time and develop study skills. 38  Study skills/ organizational skills  Manage time

39 The 3 rd Habit: Develop strong reading and writing skills. 39 Literacy Design Collaborative Plug and Play Templates

40 Southern Regional Education Board The 3 rd Habit: Plug and Play Task 2: [Insert question] After reading ________ (literature or informational texts), write ________ (essay or substitute) that addresses the question and support your position with evidence from the text(s). L2 Be sure to acknowledge competing views. L3 Give examples from past or current events or issues to illustrate and clarify your position. (Argumentation/Analysis) 40

41 The 3 rd Habit: Develop strong reading and writing skills. 41 After researching food experts and relevant informational texts about potatoes, prepare an article for the school newsletter that compares different kinds of potatoes and how they hold up in a perfect dish of hash browns. Support your position with evidence from your research. Be sure to acknowledge why the preparations worked or didn’t work well. Give examples from your reading and tasks to illustrate and clarify your position.

42 Boomerangs Phil and Cath make and sell boomerangs for a school event. The money they raise will go to charity. They plan to make them in two sizes: small and large 42 The 4th Habit: Develop strong mathematics skills.

43 43 Phil will carve them from wood. The small boomerang takes 2 hours to carve and the large one takes 3 hours to carve. Phil has a total of 24 hours available for carving. Cath will decorate them. She only has time to decorate 10 boomerangs of either size. The small boomerang will make $8 for charity. The large boomerang will make $10 for charity. They want to make as much money for charity as they can. How many small and large boomerangs should they make? How much money will they then make? Boomerangs, continued

44 Alex’s solution 44

45 Danny’s solution 45

46 Jeremiah’s solution 46

47 Tanya's solution 47

48 Evaluating Sample Responses to Discuss What do you like about the work? How has each student organized the work? What mistakes have been made? What isn't clear? What questions do you want to ask this student? In what ways might the work be improved? 48

49 Solve a Math Problem 49 A billboard advertising the need to spay/neuter cats states that a female cat can have over 1500 descendants in 18 months. Is this a true statement? Information: The gestation period is an average of 66 days. Kittens are weaned between six and seven weeks. Cats reach sexual maturity at four months A litter usually has between four and six kittens. A cat can have a litter every four months.

50 The 5 th Habit: Set goals and make plans to reach them. 50  Determine students’ strengths and career interests.  Help students develop a long-term vision of success.  Guide students in developing plans to achieve goals.  Monitor completion of goals and revise plans as necessary.  Help students develop a program of study tied to long-term goals and areas of interest.  Teach students to set short-term academic goals.  Guide students in exploring postsecondary and career options related to areas of interest. Chapter 11 Objectives

51 The 6th Habit: Access resources needed to achieve goals. 51  Introduce students to the range of extra-help resources available at school and in the community.  Help students to access and use services as needed.  Be attentive to students’ needs that may require outside assistance and connect students with the proper sources of support.  Develop students’ abilities to seek support and to learn independently.  Provide opportunities for teamwork and interdisciplinary learning. Chapter 12 Objectives

52 The 1 st Habit: Build and maintain productive relationships with peers and adults. 52 Chapter Seven Objectives  Create trusting relationships between students and teachers.  Help students learn about each others.  Develop students’ abilities to communicate effectively with their teachers.  Acquaint students with administrators, other school personnel and adults in the community who can provide support.  Teach and help students practice teamwork.  Help students find additional venues for practicing the six habits of success through participation in extracurricular activities. (p. 127).

53 53 Positive Relationships

54 Creating Positive, Productive Relationships Two central principles: 1.Positive change cannot occur in isolation. In order for children to feel supported, the whole class, as well as the teacher, must be cheering for them, and believing transformations can occur. 2.Classroom power has to be shared among its members. Children are more likely to work hard at learning if they’re included in the process of running the classroom and making decisions.” From: Belonging: Creating Community in the Classroom 54

55 Southern Regional Education Board Motivation Behaviors Choices Self-theories Messages Invitations Intentionality 55

56 Motivation Daniel Pink Drive Autonomy Mastery Purpose 56

57 It’s the Culture! “The most important determining factor in an organization or a school in building an environment of trust and a culture of success is the level and quality of positive energy expended by all its stakeholders through the relationships of its members.” dd. 57

58 “Our beliefs about ourselves and the nature of our abilities—our self- theories—determine how we interpret our experiences and can set the boundaries on what we accomplish.” Carol Dweck quoted in Drive by Daniel Pink 58 Positive Relationships Self-theory

59 Creating Positive, Productive Relationships Two central principles: 1.Positive change cannot occur in isolation. In order for children to feel supported, the whole class, as well as the teacher, must be cheering for them, and believing transformations can occur. 2.Classroom power has to be shared among its members. Children are more likely to work hard at learning if they’re included in the process of running the classroom and making decisions.” From: Belonging: Creating Community in the Classroom 59

60 Choices 60

61 I am not who you think I am- I am not who I think I am- I am who I think you think I am. 61 Teacher Expectations and Student Achievement (TESA) Human Functioning Self-theory

62 “Our beliefs about ourselves and the nature of our abilities—our self- theories—determine how we interpret our experiences and can set the boundaries on what we accomplish.” Carol Dweck quoted in Drive by Daniel Pink 62 Self-theory

63 What teachers say to themselves about themselves is very important. What teachers say to themselves about students is vital. When teachers have good thoughts about themselves, they are more positive about their students. Positive teacher self-talk about students involves viewing students as able, valuable, and responsible. 63 Teacher’s Self-talk

64 64 What Students say to themselves about themselves is very important. What Students say to themselves about students is vital. When Students have good thoughts about themselves, they are more positive about their students. Positive Students self-talk about students involves viewing students as able, valuable, and responsible. What Students Say to Themselves William Purkey Students’ Self-talk

65 The message… 65

66 Serotonin 66

67 Teaching and Marzano’s Taxonomy New Taxonomy Level OperationStudent-centered questions about performance tasks central to information, mental procedures and psychomotor procedures: Level 6: Self- system Thinking Examining Importance How important is it for me to learn this information or procedure? Examining Efficacy How competent do I feel in regards to success in meeting the lesson objective? Examining Emotional Response Am I bored, apathetic or engaged in what I am being asked to do? Examining Motivation Am I motivated to improve competence or understanding relative to task? 67

68 Two Powerful Concepts Positive Energy Must be Intentional and Equitable 68

69 Which comes first? Change in Behavior or Change in Attitude? 69

70 The Inviting School and Staff 1.Intentionally Disinviting (Deliberately discouraging; Busy with other obligations; Focused on students’ shortcomings). 2.Unintentionally Disinviting (Well-meaning, but condescending; Obsessed with policies and procedures; Unaware of students’ feelings). 3.Unintentionally Inviting (Well-liked and reasonably effective; Inconsistent and uncertain in decision-making). Counselors and teachers who are “naturals”, but who are unaware of the nature and good effects of their behavior. 4.Intentionally Inviting (Optimistic, respectful, and trustworthy; Able to affirm yet guide students). Teachers and counselors who explicitly invite students, teachers, administrators, and parents and are able to adjust and evaluate their invitations as necessary. 70

71 The adults in the building must be positive in every way that the student may not see at home. 71 Cold home-cold school (-) Cold home-warm school (+) Warm home-warm school (++)

72 We do our best work when we are AWARE 72

73 73 Self-sufficient Able to provide for oneself without the aid of others; independent. In the final analysis it is not what you do for your children but what you have taught them to do for themselves that will make them successful human beings. -- From the "Ask Ann Landers" American advice column

74 “Each student deserves a high-quality academic education that lays the groundwork for success in adulthood. Today’s high schools must prepare students to enroll in college or complete a training program, or to enter the workforce at a level where they are expected to think critically and solve problems, learn new skills, and be in line for promotion and career advancement.” Rethinking High School Corbett and Huebner

75 “The most important determining factor in an organization or a school in building an environment of trust and a culture of success is the level and quality of positive energy expended by all its stakeholders through the relationships of its members.” dd. 75 Concluding…

76 76 Dorothy Dolasky, Ed. D. EDConsult LLC Thank You!

77 77


Download ppt "Dorothy Dolasky, Ed. D. EDConsult, LLC. 334.740.0719 1 East Central Regional Center (ECRC) Ohio."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google