Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Development of the Factory System Lecture 1 Implications of Factory Production.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Development of the Factory System Lecture 1 Implications of Factory Production."— Presentation transcript:

1 Development of the Factory System Lecture 1 Implications of Factory Production

2 Administrative Quiz Reminder Essay Reminder Reading for next class

3 Review Importance of Unfree Labor in the Colonial and Revolutionary Periods Resistance of all forms of labor, free and unfree, to abuse by employers Power of employers over even free employees extensive. Included –Power to prevent them from leaving their work –Power to use corporal punishment Workers and Political Parties

4 Today I.Factory Production II.Challenges factory production presented to employers and workers III.Early factories in the United States IV.Opposition to factory production V.Massachusetts shoe strike of 1860 VI.Issues of Concern to Workers

5 I. Factory Production What is a factory? Is factory production different from other kinds of wage labor? Other kinds of unfree labor? In what ways?

6 Factory Production How is factory production different from handicraft production? How is factory production different from farm production or common labor? What challenges does it create for the employer? What challenges does it create for the workers?

7 II. Challenges for the employer Assembly of a work force Training and discipline of the work force

8 Challenges for the workers Work life? Home life?

9 III. The Early Factory System Where and when was the first factory built in the United States? What were the principal early factory industries in the United States? What was a “panic” and how did it affect factory employment? When were there panics before the Civil War?

10 IV. Opposition to the Factory System Who was opposed? What forms did opposition take?

11 V. Massachusetts Shoe Strike 1860 Which goal did the strikers achieve (at least in part) and which goal did they completely fail to achieve? Achieved an increase in wages from many of the manufacturers Failed to get manufacturers to sign the “bill of wages”

12 VI. Issues of Concern to Workers: Mechanics’ Lien Laws Closed Shop Ten-hour day Managerial Physical Abuse Others –Voting rights for unpropertied male citizens –Free public education –Debt imprisonment

13 Next Time Spread of the factory system Rising resistance to employers

14 Development of the Factory System Lecture 2 The Spread of the Factory System

15 Administrative Reading for next class – Genovese Essay in B&L

16 Review Factory production began only in 1790 Challenges of factory production for both the employers and the workers

17 Today I.How Did Workers View Their Situation? II.Employer Responses III.The Lowell System

18 I. How Did Workers View Their Situation? Comparisons to abused workers of Europe Comparisons to slaves –White slaves –Wage slaves Existence of chattel slavery may have deflected attention from the abuses suffered by wage earners

19 II. Responses of Employers The need to compete with British manufacturers The need to compete with slave labor in the south

20 Employers Today: Analogies Issues –Unionization –Health Insurance –Paid family leave Arguments –Prevents the flexibility needed in today’s global market place –Increases costs damaging our ability to compete

21 Validity of Employer Arguments? Our unionization already among the lowest in the developed world Others already have national health insurance Others already have paid family leave –What family leave do we have? –Do we have a shorter work year than our competitors?

22 III. The Lowell System Method of organizing textile factories Based in Lowell Massachusetts Staffing – mostly young unmarried women –Worked 12-hour days six days a week –Lived in dormitories operated by the employers –Not allowed out unchaperoned –Only had Sunday off if went to church

23 Rationale for the Lowell System Workers inherently lazy and require close supervision and coercion The working class is inherently immoral Young women need to help their families until the are married but also need their virtue protected Employers get labor in return for protecting young women and keeping them employed

24 Next Time Begin detailed discussion of slave labor in the United States Role of slavery and role of race and racism


Download ppt "Development of the Factory System Lecture 1 Implications of Factory Production."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google