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California Educational Opportunity Report.  Examines the relationship among educational goals, achievement and conditions in California’s public schools.

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Presentation on theme: "California Educational Opportunity Report.  Examines the relationship among educational goals, achievement and conditions in California’s public schools."— Presentation transcript:

1 California Educational Opportunity Report

2  Examines the relationship among educational goals, achievement and conditions in California’s public schools.  Compares California’s schools to schools across the nation and differences among schools in state.  Explores the gap between achievement in schools and aspirations of students and parents and demands of future economy

3 Parents Focus Groups acknowledged their appreciation for local teachers and school leaders conceded that the system often does not provide these educators with the tools they need to be successful. 1/2 noted that high schools lack critical resources and programs

4 Parents Focus Groups many pointed out that these problems are unevenly distributed across the state worried that the weakening economy would lead to further cuts to educational programs.

5 The Economic Crisis  The state ’ s economy has gone from bad to worse.  Not whether there will be cuts, but how deep they ’ ll be.  Awaiting recovery is not a plan - we must focus on: Californians ’ educational goals, and what conditions are needed to attain the goals?

6 What are the consequences of this?

7 Parents care about equity I think there’s some kids that really kind of get left behind. Mother of Public School student It’s very uneven, depending on where you live. Mother of Public School student

8 The many gaps

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10 High School Graduation and College Going  California graduates a smaller proportion of its 9 th grade class than most other states.  California sends a smaller proportion of students directly to four-year colleges and universities than almost any other state.

11  Fewer than 60 of every 100 Latino and African American 9 th graders in the original Class graduated in  Fewer than 15 of these students graduated having fulfilled their A-G requirements.

12 What do students want? almost 9 out of 10 California 10th graders say they expect to graduate from High School and a strong majority plan to attain a bachelor’s degree or higher

13 What do parents want? almost 9 out of 10 of parents want their children to attain a bachelor’s degree. At least 8 in 10 parents of every racial/ethnic group want their children to complete at least a four-year degree.

14 VALUE OF COLLEGE  Proportion of workers with postsecondary education doubled, from 28% to 59% since  Difference between the average wage of high school graduates and workers with some college education rose from 43% to 73% between  Proportion of jobs requiring at least a Bachelor’s degree is likely to grow from 31% today to 41% in 2025.

15 Parents say: Diversity in state but not in schools I like the diversity and the exposure the kids get. I appreciate that. Father of Public school student What concerns me most of all is California is a very diverse state, but you don’t see that in the school system. Mother of Public school student

16 we divided California schools into 3 types % underrepresented students %underrepresented students 3.90+%underrepresented students

17 Group % MAJORITY WHITE & ASIAN SCHOOLS Schools with majority of students WELL represented at 4 year state universities (White & Asian )

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19 Group % MIXED SCHOOLS Schools with % of underrepresented students at 4 year state universities

20 Group 3 INTENSELY SEGREGATED SCHOOLS Schools with HIGH concentration (90%+) of underrepresented students in 4 year state universities (African American, Latino, American Indian)

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22 one of the nation ’ s most racially segregated states Almost 3/4 of African American and Latino students are enrolled in secondary schools where the majority of students are from underrepresented groups. Fewer than 2% of White and Asian students are enrolled in intensely segregated schools.

23 Intensely segregated schools are far more likely than other secondary schools to serve high concentrations of low- income students and students learning English.

24 Intensely segregated high schools are 48 times as likely as majority white and Asian high schools to enroll more than one-third English Learners.

25 Parents’ say: Inadequate and Unequal Learning Conditions and Opportunities I believe there’s a lot of very good teachers, very good personnel and administrators there in the schools, but I [worry about the lack of infrastructure and resources that are available for these people to actually do their jobs. Father of California public school student It’s all about the zip codes in California. It’s good if you live in what you call the exclusive, good areas. [Their schools] look like colleges. You know it’s all about demographics. Mother of California public school student

26 Parents’ say: Inadequate and Unequal Learning Conditions and Opportunities I believe there’s a lot of very good teachers, very good personnel and administrators there in the schools, but I [worry about the lack of infrastructure and resources that are available for these people to actually do their jobs. Father of California public school student It’s all about the zip codes in California. It’s good if you live in what you call the exclusive, good areas. [Their schools] look like colleges. You know it’s all about demographics. Mother of California public school student

27 Parents say: Schools are overcrowded It ’ s incredibly frustrating to be a parent of two little girls in elementary school [with] overcrowding — and they ’ re in bungalows or just basically trailers. Mother of California public school student

28 OVERCROWDED SCHOOLS National average: 603 students  32 middle schools enroll more than 2,000 students

29 OVERCROWDED SCHOOLS  114 high schools enroll more than 3,000 students  18 high schools enroll more than 4,000 students National average: 887 students.

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31 Parents say: Too Many Students per Counselor In the public schools there’s like one or two counselors. Sometimes it’s a volunteer parent. But there’really not enough to meet the needs of all the kids and give them good direction. Mother of California public school student I really get angry that there’s no college counselors. I have to go out and hire a college counselor in order to be guaranteed that I’m in the right direction as a single parent, I need help. Mother of High School Junior

32 TOO FEW COUNSELORS High Schools: 474 students per counselor National average: 249, 49th among states Middle schools: 727 students per counselor

33 Parents say: Not enough teachers The teacher doesn’t have time to answer his questions because she’s over packed in her class so that makes [my son] upset. Mother of California public school student I think they should really focus on maybe smaller, more personal classes because people can get lost in the cracks when they just don’t feel like they exist anymore. Father of California public school student

34 Parents say: Not enough teachers The teacher doesn’t have time to answer his questions because she’s over packed in her class so that makes [my son] upset. Mother of California public school student I think they should really focus on maybe smaller, more personal classes because people can get lost in the cracks when they just don’t feel like they exist anymore. Father of California public school student

35 STUDENT-TEACHER RATIOS  There are 46% more middle school students per teacher and 38% more high school students per teacher in California than the national average.  California has the largest middle school and high school classrooms in the nation

36 Intensely segregated high schools are almost seven times as likely as majority white and Asian high schools to experience severe shortages of qualified teachers.

37 TEACHER QUALITY  1/4 to 1/3 of high school teachers in each of the core subject areas are either underprepared, teaching out of field, or in their first or second year of teaching.  In 1/4 of high schools, more than 20% of college preparatory courses are taught by teachers teaching outside their subject area expertise.

38 Intensely segregated high schools are four times as likely to experience this problem as are high schools with majority white and Asian students.

39 MATH TEACHER PREPARATION  In more than half of California ’ s middle schools (serving 600,000 students), the majority of math teachers lack a specialized math credential.  More than 1/3 of high schools (more than 500,000 students) face severe shortages of fully certified math teachers, and, as such, fail to meet NCLB requirements.

40 Math teacher shortage is almost twice as likely to occur in intensely segregated middle schools as in majority white and Asian middle schools.

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42 Parents say: Limited Access to High-Quality College Preparatory Curriculum You look at the AP courses that are available for students and what they offer at different high schools. I know at West High they don’t have as many as they have as East High, and they don’t have as many as South High. You know, it is all about demographics. Mother of California public school student If you have your bar way down there then that’s no contest for them. They’re not going to have anything to aspire to, but if you raise your bar up here then they’ll have to continually make themselves better. Mother of California public school student

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44 While 1/2 high schools serving majority white and Asian students lack sufficient A-G courses, more than 2/3 of the high schools with a majority of underrepresented students face this problem.

45 Parents say: Not enough AP classes You look at the AP courses that are available for students and what they offer at different high schools. I know at West High* they don’t have as many as they have at East High*, and they don’t have as many as South High*. You know, it is all about demographics. Mother of public school student

46 ADVANCED MATH CLASSES  In 59% of California high schools, less than 1/2 of 11 th and 12 th graders enroll in physics or chemistry courses that require college preparatory math.  More than 560,00 students attend schools in which fewer than half of 8th graders are enrolled in algebra or equivalent.

47 While in 81% of California high schools, less than 1/2 of 11 th and 12 th graders enroll in advanced math courses, students in schools serving majority African American and Latino are more likely than those in majority white and Asian schools to experience this problem.

48 More than 560,00 students attend schools in which fewer than half of 8th graders are enrolled in algebra or equivalent.

49 What do we do with this information? Ask your principal or school Board member: We know that California has larger class sizes in middle school and high school (and in Elementary school in grades 4 and 5) than in any other state. Do large classes make it more difficult for you to achieve your learning goals with all students?

50 Even before the current round of budget cuts, California spent about 78 cents for every dollar spent nationally on each student. This number is likely worse now. If California spent at the national average, your school would receive at least $2000 more for each student. (For a school of 500 students, this is $1 milliion; for a school of 2000, it is $4 million.) Given your goals for the school, how would you spend this $ and what difference would it make for students? What do we do with this information?

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