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How can you change society when society doesn’t want to be changed? By Shelley Jobe.

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Presentation on theme: "How can you change society when society doesn’t want to be changed? By Shelley Jobe."— Presentation transcript:

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2 How can you change society when society doesn’t want to be changed? By Shelley Jobe

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4 “It’s all about color.” The power and privilege given to some in this society effects everyone. Teachers need to be aware of society’s views and counter act the oppressive and racist ones. (Alexie, 2007; Delpit, 2006; Johnson, 2001; Lew, 2006; Orenstein, 1994; Spring, 2008; Tatum, 2003; Venezuela, 1999.)

5 …and gender, and money… The way that individuals are treated based on their ethnic background, gender, socio-economic class and physical abilities needs to be changed. (Alexie, 2007; Delpit, 2006; Gurian & Stevens, 2005; Johnson, 2001; Lew, 2006; Orenstein, 1994; Spring, 2008; Tatum, 2003; Venezuela, 1999.)

6 “Schools are divided into separate tribes.” Society teaches children to recognize the differences. (Alexie, 2007; Delpit, 2006; Johnson, 2001; Lew, 2006; Orenstein, 1994; Rogoff, 2003; Spring, 2008; Tatum, 2003; Venezuela, 1999.)

7 “Schools are divided into separate tribes.” The behaviors and views of members of society affect the behaviors of others. Individuals with common cultural or ethnic backgrounds tend to create social groups to help support each other from the racism in society and in the school. (Alexie, 2007; Delpit, 2006; Johnson, 2001; Lew, 2006; Orenstein, 1994; Skinner, 1971: Spring, 2008; Tatum, 2003; Venezuela, 1999; Wertsch, 1985)

8 “We fight for our America” Throughout the history of America there have been religious and racial groupings and conflict between those groups. (Spring, 2008)

9 “We fight for our America” We are fighting for a social transformation that that can break down the barriers between those groups and can change the system of oppression that exists.

10 “We fight for our America” By fighting against what society claims is the way America should be, youth and teachers (as well as others) can help to continue the social transformation that is needed. (Delpit, 2006)

11 “We in a war” A war to change the “us” vs. “them” mentality that the American society still clings to. A war to change this country’s class status that is confirmed and reinforced through the education system. (Alexie, 2007; Delpit, 2006; Gurian & Stevens, 2005; Johnson, 2001; Lew, 2006; Orenstein, 1994; Rogoff, 2003; Singer & Revenson, 1996; Spring, 2008; Tatum, 2003; Venezuela, 1999)

12 “If they weren’t here everything would be better for you” We need to be aware of the privilege that we have and aware of how that privilege affects others.

13 “If they weren’t here everything would be better for you” By going against the path of least resistance and by being what Johnson (2001) called actively anti-racist things can change.

14 Curriculum Making sure that in the schools all ethnicities are welcomed and that racist and sexist comments and actions are stopped. All students need to feel safe and represented in the school and curriculum. (Alexie, 2007; Delpit, 2006; Gurian & Stevens, 2005; Johnson, 2001; Lew, 2006; Orenstein, 1994; Spring, 2008; Tatum, 2003; Venezuela, 1999.)

15 Curriculum By providing a curriculum that is not race or gender bias the students can start to modify their mental model for how society should be and see how people are divided because of bias. (Alexie, 2007; Delpit, 2006; Gurian & Stevens, 2005; Johnson, 2001; Lew, 2006; Orenstein, 1994; Rogoff, 2003; Singer & Revenson, 1996; Skinner, 1971; Spring, 2008; Tatum, 2003; Venezuela, 1999; Wertsch, 1985)

16 “You can’t make someone want an education” By providing an engaging curriculum the students will want to learn. (Alexie, 2007; Arends, 1997; Delpit, 2006; Dewey 1938; Gurian & Stevens, 2005; Jensen, 2005; Orenstein, 1994; Skinner, 1971; Tatum, 2003; Venezuela, 1999.)

17 Learning The brain has the capability to take in information visually, verbally, and kinesthetically The neurons in the brain create neuropathways that connect all of the information. (Jensen, 2005; Zull, 2002)

18 Learning The more that is learned on a topic the easier it is for the brain to take in the information. By providing information in a variety of ways the brain can make connections between different parts of the brain. (Arends, 1997; Jensen, 2005; Zull, 2002)

19 “Why don’t you explain it to me?” By getting to know the students a teacher will know how best to teach them and how to make a connection with them. By knowing the community and the cultural backgrounds the curriculum and experiences can be made more meaningful for the students. (Alexie, 2007; Arends, 1997; Dewey, 1938; Delpit, 2006; Gurian & Stevens, 2005; Lew, 2006; Orenstein, 1994; Rogoff, 2003; Singer & Revenson, 1996; Skinner, 1971; Tatum, 2003; Venezuela, 1999; Wertsch, 1985)

20 “Stand on the line…” Making the curriculum relevant to the students and having it relate to their past learning or experiences will allow for the brain connections to strengthen. If the students see their similarities and build connections with each other they will create a community of learners and a bond that can be used to help each other meet their goals. (Alexie, 2007; Delpit, 2006;Dewey, 1938; Jensen, 2005; Lew, 2006; Orenstein, 1994; Singer & Revenson, 1996; Skinner, 1971; Tatum, 2003; Venezuela, 1999; Wertsch, 1985; Zull, 2002)

21 “Everyone has their own story” Each student has their own story and teachers should get to know their students’ stories. By showing that you care about them, their story, and their community, the student is more willing to strive to reach higher goals. (Alexie, 2007; Arends, 1997; Dewey, 1938; Delpit, 2006; Orenstein, 1994; Tatum, 2003; Venezuela, 1999)

22 “There’s no place like this out there for us.” This is the social control that society wants to maintain. This is what we are in the war to change. Society needs to realize that the change is needed so that all can have their lives matter and feel respected. (Johnson, 2001; Spring, 2008; Tatum, 2003)

23 “No body listens to a teenager” All voices need to be heard. It does not matter the gender, race, sexuality, or age. The youth of today are the leaders of tomorrow. By helping to change the way they view each other and the bias they have society can change. (Alexie, 2007; Delpit, 2006; Gurian & Stevens, 2005; Johnson, 2001; Lew, 2006; Orenstein, 1994; Spring, 2008; Tatum, 2003; Venezuela, 1999.)

24 How can we change a society that does not want to be changed? Through Teaching, Learning and Schooling

25 Learning and Caring By being aware of how the brain functions and how learning takes place a teacher can make appropriate choices that will best support the learning of the students. By providing a variety of styles of teaching to enable the most students to engage in the learning and the most brain connections to be made. By caring for the students and challenging them academically. (Alexie, 2007; Arends, 1997; Delpit, 2006; Dewey, 1938; Jensen, 2005; Orenstein, 1994; Plato, 1900/1995; Singer & Revenson, 1996; Skinner, 1971; Tatum, 2003; Venezuela, 1999; Wertsch, 1985; Zull, 2002)

26 Safe and Respected By providing an environment in which students feel safe and respected. By providing a multicultural curriculum that allows for everyone to be represented. and

27 Renewal Teachers, schools, and students can cause a social renewal. A renewal that is not the same social standards past on to the next generation, but new standards that can rise up with those who have learned to go against the path of least resistance and want the change. (Johnson, 2001)

28 References Alexie, S. (2007). The absolutely true diary of a part-time Indian. NY: Little, Brown and Company. Arends, R. (1997). Classroom instruction and management. San Francisco: The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Delpit, L. (2006). Other people’s children: Cultural conflict in the classroom. NY: The New Press. Dewey, J. (1938). Experience & education. New York: Touchstone. Gurian, M, & Stevens, K. (2005). The minds of boys: Saving our sons from falling behind in school and life. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. Jensen, E. (2005). Teaching with the brain in mind (2nd ed.). Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. Johnson, A. (2001). Privilege, power, and difference. Mountain View, CA: Mayfield Publishing Company. Lew, J. (2006). Asain Americans in class: Charting the achievement gap among Korean American youth. NY: Teachers College Press. Orenstein, P. (1994). School girls: Young women, self-esteem and the confidence gap. NY: Doubleday. Plato. (1900/1995). Meno (B. Jowett, trans.). Retrieved August 22, 2007, from Columbia University, Institute for Learning Technologies Web site: no/meno.html. Rogoff, B. (2003). The cultural nature of human development. New York: Oxford University Press. Singer, D. & Revenson, T. (1996). A Piaget primer: How a child thinks (revised ed.). New York: Penguin Books USA, Inc. Skinner, B. (1971). Beyond freedom & dignity. New York: Bantam/Vintage Books, Inc. Spring, J. (2008). The American School: From the Puritan’s to No Child Left Behind. NY: McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Tatum, B. (2003). “Why are all the black kids sitting together in the cafeteria?” and other conversations about race. NY: Basic Books. Wertsch, J. (1985). Vygotsky and the social formation of mind. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. Zull, J. (2002). The art of changing the brain. Sterling, VA: Stylus Publishing, LLC.

29 The End Thank you!


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