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Microsoft Volume Licensing

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Presentation on theme: "Microsoft Volume Licensing"— Presentation transcript:

1 Microsoft Volume Licensing
4/10/2017 Microsoft Volume Licensing Licensing Options for Partner Hosted Cloud © 2012 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. Microsoft, Windows, and other product names are or may be registered trademarks and/or trademarks in the U.S. and/or other countries. The information herein is for informational purposes only and represents the current view of Microsoft Corporation as of the date of this presentation. Because Microsoft must respond to changing market conditions, it should not be interpreted to be a commitment on the part of Microsoft, and Microsoft cannot guarantee the accuracy of any information provided after the date of this presentation. MICROSOFT MAKES NO WARRANTIES, EXPRESS, IMPLIED OR STATUTORY, AS TO THE INFORMATION IN THIS PRESENTATION.

2 Agenda Definitions Partner Hosting Scenarios
4/10/2017 Agenda Definitions Partner Hosting Scenarios Dedicated Hosting Hybrid Hosting License Mobility through Software Assurance RDS User CAL Extended Rights Management & Monitoring hybrid scenarios Shared Hosting SPLA shared hosting SPLA using Software Services Resellers and Data Center Providers Volume Licensing Customers with External Users Scenarios Builder notes: I have modified the text formatting for this slide. You do not need to click the Bullets button. Text box starts with bold first line, then to access the lighter face and the bullet lists, after return, click the Increase List Level button. Web workloads Self-hosted ISV Applications Resources © 2012 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. Microsoft, Windows, and other product names are or may be registered trademarks and/or trademarks in the U.S. and/or other countries. The information herein is for informational purposes only and represents the current view of Microsoft Corporation as of the date of this presentation. Because Microsoft must respond to changing market conditions, it should not be interpreted to be a commitment on the part of Microsoft, and Microsoft cannot guarantee the accuracy of any information provided after the date of this presentation. MICROSOFT MAKES NO WARRANTIES, EXPRESS, IMPLIED OR STATUTORY, AS TO THE INFORMATION IN THIS PRESENTATION.

3 Some definitions Software Services Infrastructure as a Service
Platform as a Service Software as a Service Services that Microsoft partners provide to their customers that make products available and that display, run, access, or otherwise interact with Microsoft licensed products. IaaS is a shared cloud infrastructure to substitute on premises physical infrastructure. PaaS is using the cloud as a server platform for building a new generation of cloud applications. SaaS is consuming entire workloads as finished services running in the cloud. Data Center Provider Software Services Reseller External User Volume Licensing Customer An entity that provides software services, usually infrastructure services, to another Service Provider. (Including Microsoft Azure) An entity that resells a Service Provider’s software services to End Users. Users that are not either your or your affiliates’ employees, or your or your affiliates’ onsite contractors or onsite agents. An entity that has an active Microsoft Volume Licensing Agreement such as Enterprise Agreement, Select Plus, Open License, or other that is not a Services Provider License Agreement (SPLA). Referenced throughout as “end customer.” (*) In SPLA, Service Provider’s End Users are External Users

4 Partner hosting scenarios
4/10/2017 Partner hosting scenarios Dedicated hosting Hybrid hosting Shared hosting (single tenant) (single tenant app/multi-tenant infrastructure) (multi-tenant) Dedicated Outsourcing Customer provides all software Dedicated Hosting #1 Customer provides apps; Partner provides dedicated infrastructure Dedicated Hosting #2 Partner provides dedicated apps and infrastructure LM through SA (*) Customer provides server apps; Partner provides shared infrastructure RDS User CAL Extended Rights Customer provides RDS CALs; Partner provides shared infrastructure IaaS Hosting Dedicated VMs Partner provides dedicated apps on shared infrastucture. Shared Hosting Partner’s SPLA licenses Detail Customer brings app and infrastructure Via VL agreement (SA not required) Customer brings app via VL (SA not required); Partner provides infrastructure under SPLA Partner provides apps and infra via SPLA (cannot use its own VL license) Customer brings apps via LM through SA; Hosting Partner provides infrastructure via SPLA Customer accesses app with RDS User CALs with SA; Hosting partner provides infrastructure via SPLA Hosting Partner provides apps and infrastructure via SPLA (cannot use their own VL license) Hosting Partner provides apps and infrastructure via SPLA (cannot use their own VL license) Customer A Customer B Customer C Customer A Customer A Customer A Customer A Customer B End Customer SA DEDICATED DEDICATED DEDICATED DEDICATED DEDICATED DEDICATED SHARED RDS CAL + SA Virtual Machines Partner’s Data Center DEDICATED DEDICATED DEDICATED SHARED SHARED Physical Servers Multi-tenant physical server(s) Dedicated Physical server(s) Virtual machine(s) Customer VL license Partner’s spla license © 2012 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. Microsoft, Windows, and other product names are or may be registered trademarks and/or trademarks in the U.S. and/or other countries. The information herein is for informational purposes only and represents the current view of Microsoft Corporation as of the date of this presentation. Because Microsoft must respond to changing market conditions, it should not be interpreted to be a commitment on the part of Microsoft, and Microsoft cannot guarantee the accuracy of any information provided after the date of this presentation. MICROSOFT MAKES NO WARRANTIES, EXPRESS, IMPLIED OR STATUTORY, AS TO THE INFORMATION IN THIS PRESENTATION.

5 Dedicated hosting

6 Dedicated hosting Scenarios Hosting Partner Dedicated VM
Hosting Partner Dedicated Servers Scenarios Scenario #1: Company A chooses to engage a hosting partner to manage its server systems for use by Company A’s employees and/or contractors. Company A requires a single tenant (dedicated) environment. Scenario #2: Company A is a retailer with a large online presence, and is engaging the Hosting Partner to manage the servers accessed and used by the employees and contractors of Company A. Additionally, the hosting partner will manage and maintain the web and e-commerce servers that Company A’s customers use to interact with the Company A’s online store. Company A requires a single tenant environment. Licensing Options Scenario #1: Company A acquires server applications under VL and allows the Hosting Partner to deploy and manage those licenses in a dedicated environment on its behalf. Scenario #2: Company A acquires VL licenses and allows the Hosting Partner to deploy and manage those licenses on their behalf in a dedicated environment. For the e-commerce servers, Company A needs to acquire External Connectors to provide access to external users. Scenario #1 & 2: Hosting Partner acquires software using its SPLA and provides Software Services to Company A in a dedicated environment. Example Company A outsources its IT to another company (hosting partner) in dedicated servers and virtually dedicated VMs. As a large retailer, Company A outsources its server management as well as online store management to Hosting Partner, who will deploy that environment in physically dedicated servers to Company A. Company A (Employees & Contractors) Company A’s Online Store Consumers Dedicated Physical server(s) Virtual machine(s) Company a internal users Company a customers (external users)

7 Hybrid hosting

8 License Mobility through Software Assurance
Scenario Hosting Partner offers to its customers access to a shared infrastructure platform based on Windows Server onto which the customer may deploy their eligible Microsoft server applications or workloads on a dedicated virtual machine. Licensing Options Hosting Partner can acquire respective licenses to offer IaaS (e.g. Windows Server) via its SPLA. Company C (Hosting Partner’s customer) can deploy its VL server licenses in the Hosting partner’s infrastructure in dedicated VMs, if Company C has Software Assurance and the partner follows the License Mobility through Software Assurance rules. Customers may deploy certain application server licenses with active SA from other Volume Licensing agreements via License Mobility through Software Assurance if the Hosting partner is authorized and the customer is properly licensed. MS Office and Windows Server are not eligible for LM through SA. Examples Hosting Partner hosted Infrastructure as a Service. See for more information. Company C Microsoft Application Volume Licensing server licenses with active SA Dedicated VM Hosting Partner Shared Infrastructure Multi-tenant physical server(s) PARTNER’S DATACENTER PARTNER’S INFRASTRUCTURE Virtual machine(s) Company C (Partner’s end user)

9 RDS User CAL extended rights
Scenario Scenario #1: Company A wants its employees and onsite contractors to access a Microsoft or other third party desktop application on a Hosting Partner’s dedicated or shared infrastructure. Hosting Partner is the licensee and providing the application workloads. Scenario #2: Company B wants to run a third party application on a Hosting Partner’s shared infrastructure for the use of its employees (internal use). At the same time has invested previously on RDS User CALs with Software Assurance. Scenario #3: Company C wants its employees to access a Microsoft Application (e.g. Desktop Application) provided by a Hosting Partner on its shared infrastructure and at the same time has invested previously on RDS User CALs with Software Assurance. Licensing Options Scenario #1: Hosting Partner provides desktop application software as a service (SaaS) to Company A in a dedicated or shared VM licensed via SPLA. Hosting Partner must license RDS SAL for each Company A’s user. This is because the environment will be used for Company A’s external use, as well as it’s internal use. Scenario #2: Hosting Partner provides access to a desktop application in a dedicated VM on a shared infrastructure licensed via SPLA and requires no SALs, because Company B’s users have RDS User CALs with active Software Assurance acquired via other VL Programs (e.g. EA, Select Plus). Scenario #3: Company C provides access to the Microsoft server apps for their employees (internal use) using their qualified server/CALs and RDS User CALs with active SA purchased via their Volume Licensing Agreement (EA, Select). This is allowed via License Mobility through SA rights in which the Application is running on a dedicated virtual machine (VM). Company B (End User) Company C (End User) Company A (End User) LM through SA RDS User CAL + SA RDS User SAL RDS User CAL + SA Microsoft Application Licensed and owned by Hosting Partner Dedicated or Shared VM Company’s B Application Build/owned by Company B or licensed to Company B by 3rd Party (Non-MS) Dedicated VM Microsoft Application Licensed by Company C (VL server license) Dedicated VM Hosting Partner Shared Infrastructure Company B or C internal users Multi-tenant physical server(s) Virtual machine(s)

10 Management and monitoring
Hosting Partner VM** Hosting Partner Servers* Scenario Scenario #1: Company A wishes to run software applications on a hosting partner’s shared infrastructure and wants partner to manage those workloads. Licensing Options Hosting partner licenses System Center via SPLA provides management services for Company’s A software as a service (SaaS) workloads running on hosting partner’s shared infrastructure all licensed via SPLA. Company A brings its own System Center licenses with SA and contracts with Hosting partner to manage its workloads on its behalf. Workloads are running in dedicated VMs on partner’s shared infrastructure. Company A brings its own System Center licenses and contracts with Hosting partner to manage its workloads on its behalf. Workloads are running in dedicated VMs on partner’s dedicated servers. Hosting Partner Dedicated (or Shared) Servers Hosting Partner Dedicated (only) VM System Center Server Management Console System Center managed Server OSEs Company A Alternatives 2 & 3 *Must be dedicated for answer 3 **Must be dedicated for answers 2 and 3 Hosting Partner’s infra server(s) Virtual machine(s) Company a (Partner’s end user) Partner’s spla license Company A VL license

11 Shared hosting

12 SPLA - Shared hosting Scenario Hosting Partner Shared Servers
Hosting Partner Shared VM Scenario Hosting Partner wishes to offer storefront software services to retailers such as Company A, B or C. Licensing Options Hosting Partner acquires software using a SPLA. Note: Internal use agreement (e.g., EA/Select Plus) may not be used in a shared environment. Examples Online Multi-Tenant Services. SaaS CRM Application as online services. Company A Company B Company C Company A’s Online Store Company B’s Online Store Company C’s Online Store Consumers

13 Using Software Services Reseller and Datacenter Provider
Scenario- Using a Data Center Provider Company A (SPLA Partner) intends to provide SaaS application comprised of Microsoft Products to its End Users. As a SPLA Partner and a SaaS ISV, Company A would like to leverage another Hosting Partner for its Infrastructure. Licensing Options Company A (SPLA Partner) may transact with another Service Provider (SPLA Partner) serving as a Data Center Provider(*) to acquire/consume IaaS products in order to host it’s SaaS applications. Microsoft Azure is also considered a Data Center Provider. SPLA Partner may acquire Microsoft Azure by signing an Enterprise Agreement (EA) [Server and Cloud Enrollment (SCE) or Enrollment for Windows Azure (EWA)] or via Microsoft Online Services Program (MOSP). (*) Data Center Provider licenses the infrastructure products through its own SPLA. (**) When using a Data Center Provider, Company A may host only eligible Microsoft Products licensed through SPLA listed as “Eligible for Software Services on Data Center Providers’ Servers: Yes” in the Services Provider Use Rights (SPUR) document. Example SPLA Partner is a SaaS ISV dedicated to offer desktop application to its End Users and wants to leverage another hoster to acquire IaaS to host the application End Users Company A (SPLA Partner) Contoso, Inc. Data Center Provider

14 Using Software Services Reseller and Datacenter Provider (1 of 3)
Scenario – Acting as a Data Center Provider Scenario #1: As a SPLA Partner, Company A provides infrastructure as a service (IaaS) to other Service Providers. Licensing Options Company A (SPLA Partner) may act as Data Center Provider for other Service Providers/hosters (e.g. Company B). Company A as a Data Center Provider must license and report the Microsoft Products used to provide IaaS through its SPLA agreement. Service Provider (SPLA Partner) may license eligible Microsoft Products to provide to End Users while using Company A’s shared infrastructure. Eligible products are detailed in the SPUR. (See previous slide). (**) When using Company A as a Data Center Provider, Service Provider may host only eligible Microsoft Products licensed through SPLA listed as “Eligible for Software Services on Data Center Providers’ Servers: Yes” in the SPUR. Example Company A provides IaaS for SaaS ISVs hosting applications to their respective End Users. The SaaS ISV (Service Provider) becomes a Software Services Reseller of Data Center Provider’s IaaS. End Users Company B (Service Provider) Company A (SPLA Partner) Contoso, Inc.

15 Using Software Services Reseller and Datacenter Provider (2 of 3)
Scenario – Using Software Services Resellers Scenario #2: Company A Hosting Partner wants to use a reseller (white label reseller) to distribute both its IaaS and SaaS applications to its end users. Licensing Options Company A must license and report all Microsoft Products used to deliver software services (IaaS and/or SaaS) through its SPLA. Company A must maintain an agreement with each Reseller (“Software Services Reseller Agreement”). Reseller may include additional services on top of Company A’s Software Services. Company A may use multiple resellers for its offerings but employ only one distribution layer of reseller to deliver Software Services to its End User, no additional layers is allowed programmatically. Example SPLA Partner looking to expand its distribution of both its IaaS and SaaS apps to more end users (mostly small & medium businesses), extending its services distribution through resellers on the SMB segment. End Users Reseller Company A (SPLA Partner) Contoso, Inc.

16 Using Software Services Reseller and Datacenter Provider (3 of 3)
End Users Company A (Service Provider) Company B (DC Provider) Reseller Scenario – Service Provider Using Software Services Resellers Scenario #3: Company A (Service Provider) acquiring IaaS from Company B (Data Center Provider) while also using a Software Services Reseller to distribute its SaaS applications to its end users. Licensing Options Combination of Scenario #1 and Scenario #2 (previous slides). Company B must license and report all Microsoft Products used to deliver IaaS through its own SPLA. Company A must license and report all eligible Microsoft Products (*) used to deliver SaaS to its End Users through its own SPLA. Company A may use a Software Services Reseller to reach out more small and medium companies as End Users. Microsoft Azure is also considered a Data Center Provider. SPLA Partner may acquire Microsoft Azure by signing an Enterprise Agreement (EA) [Server and Cloud Enrollment (SCE) or Enrollment for Windows Azure (EWA)] or via Microsoft Online Services Program (MOSP). (*) Using a Data Center Provider, Company A may host only eligible Microsoft Products licensed through SPLA listed as “Eligible for Software Services on Data Center Providers’ Servers: Yes” in the SPUR. Contoso, Inc.

17 Using a Data Center Outsourcer
Scenario Company A wants to focus on delivering software services while leveraging an Outsourcing Company to manage its data center, including servers administration, testing and maintenance, covering also management of any additional need for space and capacity. Licensing Options Company A may use a Datacenter Outsourcer in order to: Expand its physical datacenter capacity . Transfer responsibilities of administration, testing and maintenance of its data centers while focusing on delivering software services to its End Users. Company A must maintain an agreement with its Data Center Outsourcer to ensure authorized access only to the Microsoft Products run in the Outsourcing Company. Company A must report all Microsoft Products used to deliver software services (Iaas and/or SaaS) through its SPLA agreement, regardless of the location of its datacenter (own facilities or datacenter outsourcer facilities). Examples Company A hires Outsourcing Company for administration, testing, maintenance of additional datacenter capacity offered by Outsourcing Company. Company A hires Outsourcing Company for administration, testing and maintenance of its own datacenter. End Users Company A (SPLA Partner) Outsourcing Company

18 Volume Licensing customers with external users scenarios

19 End customer scenarios
Internal use External use Self-hosting VL Customer acquires and owns licenses for internal use (End User: Employees, On site Contractors, etc.) VL Customer uses owned licenses to provide access to publicly available content on its website(s) (End User: Business’ Customers) VL Customer uses owned licenses to provide access to web applications/services that provides customizable information for each user VL Customer creates U. Solution that includes MS software and hosts it on its servers to External End Users Detail VL Customer is licensed via VL agreement VL Customer is licensed via VL Agreement [NO External Connector license required] VL Customer is licensed via VL agreement [External Connector license required] VL Customer is licensed via VL agreement with Software Assurance [Hosting via SPLA is also an option for customer and without having to host a U. Solution] employees ON SITE contractors Website external visitors External user A External user B external USER A External USER B End User VL Customer’s Data Center DEDICATED dedicated dedicated dedicated EC+SA EC app Customer VL license app VL CUSTOMER u. solution

20 Web workloads – Content publicly available
Scenario Company A sets up a website with content equally available for any internal or external user accessing Company A’s website. No login, subscription or “freemium” subscription is required or offered to access specific content. Licensing Options Company A may use its own licenses (e.g. Windows Server, SQL Server, SharePoint, etc.) acquired through its Volume Licensing Agreement such as Enterprise Agreement, Select Plus, and/or Open. Company A does not need to acquire additional CALs or External Connector licenses for external users.* *Company A’s internal users require CALs to access Windows Server and any other product that requires CALs. Examples Informational websites Local news websites (with no subscription offer) Company A Dedicated Server External User #1 External User #2 External Users #3 (Company B)

21 Web workloads – Customizable content
Scenarios Company A offers access to additional website content (“premium”/“freemium” content) for those internal or external users that subscribe to the website. Company A offers services of their core competency such as financial services, travel services, online merchandising through its website, complementing or replacing services that could be offered on a physical location, and that requires the user to identify himself to obtain these services. Licensing Options Company A may use its own licenses (e.g. Windows Server, SQL Server, SharePoint, etc.) acquired through its Volume Licensing Agreement such as Enterprise Agreement, Select Plus, and/or Open. Company A must acquire additional CALs and External Connector licenses for users. Company A may also license via SPLA to host its website, webapp and/or web service that will also allow access to MS Products to external users. Examples Local news website with “premium” information. 401K Portal through the HR Site. Call Center Services. e-Commerce. Company A Dedicated Server ID ID ID External User #1 External User #2 External Users #3 (Company B)

22 Self-hosted ISV applications
Scenario Company A has a software application (“Unified Solution”) built on eligible Microsoft products. In addition to Company A’s employees, external users such as Company A’s customers and partners access the application. Licensing Options Company A hosts their owned (not licensed) intellectual property (IP) from its datacenter with eligible Microsoft products with active Software Assurance through traditional Volume Licensing Programs under the Self-Hosted ISV Application rights. Company A cannot use a Hosting Partner as Datacenter Provider to run its Unified Solution licensed under the Self-Hosted ISV Application rights. Company A may also acquire software using SPLA and host its Unified Solution as a service. SPLA offers a more flexible option to: (a) host more variety of software, (b) without delivering it as a Unified Solution and (c)with the option to leverage a Datacenter Provider’s IaaS. Examples SaaS ISVs develop applications and deliver through the internet. Financial firm provides financial software applications to its business customers. Dating and Social Media online services. e-Commerce including an application (unified solution) allowing customizable product catalog among other features (e.g. customized promotions sent out, billing, etc.). For more details & eligibility see “Servers – Self-Hosted Applications” section in VL PUR Appendix 2. Company A Dedicated Server Unified Solution Company B Company C Company D Note: External Connectors (or per-processor for SQL Server, etc.) required. Software Assurance required. SPLA still remains an option for Hosted ISVs preferring their features

23 Resources Microsoft Volume Licensing for Partners
https://partner.microsoft.com/ Services Provider License Agreement Program https://partner.microsoft.com/ Microsoft Hosting License Mobility through Software Assurance Self-Hosted ISV Licensing Brief https://partner.microsoft.com/download/

24 Thank you

25 Appendix

26 LM through SA vs. SALs for SA
4/10/2017 LM through SA vs. SALs for SA License Mobility through SA Hosting Partner Dedicated VM Description Allows customers to deploy server licenses with Software Assurance (SA) to a Service Provider’s cloud. Customer keeps CALs with SA on premises. Customer may deploy server licenses back to its on-premises servers (following reassignment rights). Customer may not use server licenses on both on-premises and Partner hosted cloud at the same time. Hosting Partner Shared Servers Hosting Partner Hosted Cloud EA Client Access Licenses With SA (Per user or device) EA Server Licenses With SA Hosting Partner Hosted Cloud Hosting Partner Shared VM SALs for SA Hosting Partner Shared Servers Description Allows customers to leverage their investment on productivity on premise access licenses with SA in order to run workloads in a Hosting Partner’s cloud. Supports cost effective multi-tenant deployments. Hosting Partner provides access licenses (SAL for SA) to Customer to access workloads running on Hosting Partner’s environment. Customer keeps access licenses acquired from VL agreement on-premises. Workloads running on Hosting Partner’s environment are different from the ones running on Customer’s on-premises. (*) server licenses required under the EA in a hybrid deployment (on-prem & cloud) EA Client Access Licenses With SA (Per user or device) Service Provider “SAL for SA” SKU Hosting Partner Hosted Cloud Multi-tenant physical server(s) Dedicated Physical server(s) Customer VL license Virtual machine(s) Partner’s spla license © 2012 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. Microsoft, Windows, and other product names are or may be registered trademarks and/or trademarks in the U.S. and/or other countries. The information herein is for informational purposes only and represents the current view of Microsoft Corporation as of the date of this presentation. Because Microsoft must respond to changing market conditions, it should not be interpreted to be a commitment on the part of Microsoft, and Microsoft cannot guarantee the accuracy of any information provided after the date of this presentation. MICROSOFT MAKES NO WARRANTIES, EXPRESS, IMPLIED OR STATUTORY, AS TO THE INFORMATION IN THIS PRESENTATION.


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