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Www.rallydev.com ©2013 Reduce Security Risk in Your Development Part II: Creating an Agile SSDLC #SecureDev Trent R. Hein, CCIE, CISSP, ISSMP, ISSAP, CSSA.

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Presentation on theme: "Www.rallydev.com ©2013 Reduce Security Risk in Your Development Part II: Creating an Agile SSDLC #SecureDev Trent R. Hein, CCIE, CISSP, ISSMP, ISSAP, CSSA."— Presentation transcript:

1 ©2013 Reduce Security Risk in Your Development Part II: Creating an Agile SSDLC #SecureDev Trent R. Hein, CCIE, CISSP, ISSMP, ISSAP, CSSA

2 ©2013 What We’ll Cover Today How is secure Agile development different? Creating a User Story with integrated security Security Tasks and Testing Managing security Defects Security architecture Agile Threat Map #SecureDev

3 ©2013 Quick Recap of Session 1 Information security overview What are the most common threats? How to protect sensitive data, both from a methodology and technology standpoint Standards and tools –NIST SP A, OpenSAMM, OWASP

4 ©2013 How is Secure Agile Development Different? Distinct security-focused project phases, often at beginning and end of project Security skills brought in from outside project, often disconnected from dev/test resources Specific security testing phase, often at end of project. Agile Traditional/ Waterfall Every iteration considers security, but is not limited by it. Every team member is responsible for security. Security skills are embedded in the team. Hybrid security and functionality testing, throughout project. Security Timing Security Resources Security Validation

5 ©2013 Secure Agile Development Guiding Principles Product value improves with security. Security is integral to the product, not an afterthought. Outside security resources (standards, threats, experts) provide background, not a cage.

6 ©2013 Agile security myths - 1 Myth: I’m a developer / product owner / scrum master. Security is someone else’s job. –Reality: The complex threats facing applications today requires everyone to be thinking about security. –Secure business logic –Secure coding practices –Secure test methods –Secure data architecture –Secure deployment environment

7 ©2013 Agile security myths - 2 Myth: Compliance with an Information Security Standard isn’t Agile –Reality: Compliance with an Information Security Standard, such as NIST SP A, is actually easier in an Agile environment, because “baking in” security in smaller pieces allows for simple compliance test cases and less backtracking

8 ©2013 Secure User Stories The #1 tenet of secure Agile development is to “bake” security into every user story Remember: Stories should be defined such that the lowest level child story can be implemented and accepted in a single iteration –Any security component(s) of the story, therefore, must be lightweight –What is the most basic security functionality required for the story to be compliant? –Don’t let security define the user story. Let the user story define the security.

9 ©2013 Great, Secure User Stories (from Write a Great User Story, by Ronica Roth)

10 ©2013 VIDEO DEMO 1 VIDEO DEMO – Creating a great user story with security elements included in Acceptance Criteria and Definition of Done

11 ©2013 Secure User Story DON’Ts DON’T change the user story template “As a, I want to so that ” NOT “As a, I want to so that and ” DON’T create “Security Epics” DON’T assign secure user story creation to “the security guy/gal” DON’T put technical security tasks in the user story itself.

12 ©2013 Security Tasks For each user story, the Developer should create tasks necessary to meet security acceptance criteria Developer should also detail any security testing tasks, as part of defining all the testing tasks for the story Security review may also be added as a task, assigned to a security specialist

13 ©2013 VIDEO DEMO 2 VIDEO DEMO – Adding security related tasks and testing to a user story

14 ©2013 Security Defects Security defects may be identified –As part of iteration testing –After product deployment Tagging security defects makes them easier to identify and prioritize Once defined, security defects are managed along with other defects as part of iteration acceptance and scheduling

15 ©2013 VIDEO DEMO 3 VIDEO DEMO – Security defect management

16 ©2013 Security Architecture From The Principles of Agile Architecture by Alex Yakyma and Dean Leffingwell, with contributions from Ryan Martens and Mauricio Zamora

17 ©2013 Security Architecture [..] in the context of secure Agile enterprise software systems, we need both: fast, local control of emergent design so that teams react appropriately to changing security requirements without excessive attempts to future risk proof the system, and global control of Intentional Architecture, the guidance needed to assure that the system as a whole has conceptual integrity and efficacy security. Achieving the right balance of emergent design and intentional architecture drives effective secure evolution of the system [..] From The Principles of Agile Architecture by Alex Yakyma and Dean Leffingwell, with contributions from Ryan Martens and Mauricio Zamora

18 ©2013 Agile Threat Mapping Assessment of key threats to business value, process, or data set Tied to real-world, known threats – not “theoretical” Communicated to all team members Completed by team, not by “security guy/gal”

19 ©2013 Agile Threat Mapping Template or Confidentiality: (High, Med, Low) Integrity: (High, Med, Low) Availability: (High, Med, Low) A1 – Injection A3 – Cross-site Scripting A6 – Sensitive Data Exposure or or or Confidentiality: (High, Med, Low) Integrity: (High, Med, Low) Availability: (High, Med, Low) Confidentiality: (High, Med, Low) Integrity: (High, Med, Low) Availability: (High, Med, Low) Confidentiality: (High, Med, Low) Integrity: (High, Med, Low) Availability: (High, Med, Low) A1 – Injection A3 – Cross-site Scripting A6 – Sensitive Data Exposure A1 – Injection A3 – Cross-site Scripting A6 – Sensitive Data Exposure A1 – Injection A3 – Cross-site Scripting A6 – Sensitive Data Exposure

20 ©2013 Checking Our Work

21 ©2013 Questions? Contact me: #SecureDev

22 ©2013 #SecureDev Up Next: Agile Secure Code Review July 24 th | 10am ET Trent R. Hein, CCIE, CISSP, ISSMP, ISSAP, CSSA

23 ©2013 Go Agile. Go Rally. #SecureDev


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