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There and Back Again Reclaiming Asheville’s Grove Arcade as a Public Market Bob Oast, City and Regional Planning The Ohio State University With thanks.

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Presentation on theme: "There and Back Again Reclaiming Asheville’s Grove Arcade as a Public Market Bob Oast, City and Regional Planning The Ohio State University With thanks."— Presentation transcript:

1 There and Back Again Reclaiming Asheville’s Grove Arcade as a Public Market Bob Oast, City and Regional Planning The Ohio State University With thanks to Ruth Summers of the Grove Arcade Public Market Foundation, and Stacy Merten, Historic Resources, City of Asheville

2 Asheville’s Grove Arcade The City: – Located in Western North Carolina, approx. 90 miles northwest of Charlotte, 150 miles north of Atlanta – Population: City—approx. 75,000 – Major industries (by workforce participation): Medicine, Education, Tourism, Services, Light Manufacturing – Located at intersection of I-40 and I-26

3 Asheville’s Grove Arcade

4 The History: – Asheville was a boom town in early 1900’s Good climate Nice scenery – Influx of visitors from north and “low country” south; some with money Hotels, inns, and tourist accommodations Sanitariums

5 Asheville’s Grove Arcade

6 The Architecture: – Downtown Asheville is home to several architecturally important buildings (Art Deco, Gothic Revival, International) Frederick Law Olmstead Richard Sharp Smith Raphael Guastavino Douglas Ellington IM Pei

7 Asheville’s Grove Arcade Jackson Building Lawrence City Building

8 Asheville’s Grove Arcade First Baptist Church St. Lawrence Basilica

9 Asheville’s Grove Arcade Grove Park Inn Biltmore House

10 Asheville’s Grove Arcade

11 E W Grove: – First came to Asheville in 1898; came to stay later – Major developer: Battery Park Hotel ( ) Grove Park Inn (1913) Grove Park neighborhood (started 1920s)

12 Asheville’s Grove Arcade

13 Architect: Charles W. Parker (worked with Richard Sharp Smith) Constructed of steel, covered by decorative (and fireproof) terra cotta and marble, neo- Gothic style (same as Woolworth and Chicago Tribune).

14 Asheville’s Grove Arcade Removal of Battery Park HillFramework in place

15 Asheville’s Grove Arcade The building: – Begun in 1926 – Grove died 1927 – Completed 1929 – Takes up an entire City block – 269,000 square feet on 2 ½ levels, 3 level central tower (15 floors planned); still the largest building in downtown Asheville

16 Asheville’s Grove Arcade

17 Originally designed as indoor shopping arcade “I will locate stores of every kind of merchandising business in Asheville…so that a lady can park her car anywhere in this place and can let [it] remain just as long as she pleases, and do all of her trading in that one vicinity, so that she will not have to run around in the narrow streets of the old part of the business section to do her trading.” —E.W. Grove

18 Asheville’s Grove Arcade

19 Exterior has many ornate features, including caricatures of the workers who built it. Interior has intricate woodwork, balconies with iron railings, spiral stairs, “flyovers,” and is illuminated by skylights

20 Asheville’s Grove Arcade

21 The History (cont’d): Great Depression hit Asheville hard Real estate values collapsed Building stopped Public debt was crippling – No financing – No bonds

22 Asheville’s Grove Arcade The Decline: 1942—Arcade taken over by the federal government for use in the war effort —used as federal offices (NWS, Social Security, Selective Service)

23 Asheville’s Grove Arcade federal occupation Miss America

24 Asheville’s Grove Arcade The comeback: – placed on National Register – 1985 –Government plans to build a new federal building; leave the Grove Arcade – City leaders formed Mayor’s Task Force, leading to formation of Grove Arcade Public Market Foundation (Foundation)

25 Asheville’s Grove Arcade GAPMF – Explore possibility of restoring Grove Arcade and re-commissioning for commercial/mixed use – Work with federal government to arrange for transfer – Facilitate funding Public/Private funding Tax incentives Tax credits

26 Asheville’s Grove Arcade How it happened: – Building was conveyed to City in 1997 under the National Monuments Act-Quitclaim Deed – Public entity must hold title – Other federal laws

27 Asheville’s Grove Arcade How it happened: – Conditions provide for preservation and utilization consistent with purposes of Act Preservation= restoration of exterior and interior Utilization=public market uses Restrictions on type of business, “profit making activity”

28 Asheville’s Grove Arcade How it happened: – City leases to Foundation for 99 years Lease Operating agreemen t – GAPMF subleases Individual tenant spaces on ground floor and exterior for commercial use Spaces above ground floor for office/residential

29 Asheville’s Grove Arcade Law : – Downtown Development Act (allows public/private projects in CBD) – Local Development Act of 1925 (allows economic development activity) – Historic Preservation Act (NC)

30 Asheville’s Grove Arcade Players and roles: – Foundation Coordinate construction work Lease ground floor spaces (retail/office) Manage building Secure funding (grants, tax credits, etc.)

31 Asheville’s Grove Arcade Players and roles: – City of Asheville Finance restoration of ground floor – Certificates of participation – Foundation to repay Infrastructure and permitting – Carolina Power & Light (now Duke Energy Progress) Finance restoration of upper floors/residential condos – Direct participation through housing subsidiary – State and federal historic preservation tax credits

32 Asheville’s Grove Arcade Work began in 1997

33 Asheville’s Grove Arcade Problems: – Cost = More than anticipated Asbestos Code compliance Maintenance issues – Some restructuring required for tax purposes – Occupancy rates National economy (2 recessions) Rent structure Conditions of transfer

34 Asheville’s Grove Arcade Re-opened in 2002

35 Asheville’s Grove Arcade

36

37 The impact: – Building now valued at $16.7 million – Office/condo constructed on next block – One hotel constructed, one being built within 2 blocks – Several major new buildings planned in area – 4-6 new restaurants in building (outdoor seating) – Increased pedestrian activity

38 Asheville’s Grove Arcade Before

39 Asheville’s Grove Arcade After

40 Asheville’s Grove Arcade Credits: – Ruth Summers, Grove Arcade Public Market Foundation – Stacy Merten, City of Asheville Historic Resources – Photos courtesy of the Grove Arcade Public Market Foundation and the Pack Memorial Library North Carolina Collection


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