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Carnegie Library Lab Jenny Peachey, Policy Officer #librarylab #innovate.

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Presentation on theme: "Carnegie Library Lab Jenny Peachey, Policy Officer #librarylab #innovate."— Presentation transcript:

1 Carnegie Library Lab Jenny Peachey, Policy Officer #librarylab #innovate

2 The Carnegie UK Trust #librarylab #innovate Library associal hub Tackling isolation services for older people, homeless people,disabled peopleoutreach to prisons and care homesoutreach to disadvantaged familiesservices for linguistic minoritiesservices for people suffering domestic abuse Library as community hub information about servicesaccess to public services Promotingenvironmentalawareness information aboutrecyclinginformation aboutvolunteering Promoting health information about health and health servicesbooks as therapyprovide community health services insafe environmentpartnerships with voluntary sector in library Connecting citizens information about local and national issuesspace for public meetingslegal services in the library Library ascultural centre Promoting literature author talks and book groupsbook festivalswriters in residencesupport for self-publishing Creative spaces maker spaces3D printersmedia workshops Local history resource access to family and local history materiallearning sessions on local and family historylocal people contributing to resources Library as cinema film clubs in librariesDVDs to hire Making music access to CDs and sheet musicyoung people making musicrhythm and rhyme for early yearslibrary as music venue Art, dance and drama space for exhibitions, plays and danceclasses and workshops Library aslearning hub Supporting literacy reading for pleasureSummer Reading Challengebreakfast clubs for hostel dwellerssupport for dyslexia English language language courses Early years and school age books for babieshomework support Digital literacy courses and support for all Lifelong learning filling the gaps in formal educationsupporting informal learningsignposting to adult learning Library aseconomic enabler Maximising income benefits information and supportmake the most of your incomeCAB services in librarysmart meter loans Encouraging enterprise advice and support for small businessesbusiness resources in librariessupport for social enterpriseproviding co-working spacesmaker spaces in libraries Access to employment job clubssupport for online job applicationsaccess to computers and wifisupporting digital skills WELLBEING EDUCATIONSOCIALECONOMICCULTURAL The Carnegie UK Trust works to improve thelives of people throughout the UK and Ireland,by changing minds through influencing policy,and by changing lives through innovativepractice and partnership work. The CarnegieUK Trust was established by Scots-Americanphilanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1913. Speaking Volumes: the impact of public libraries on wellbeing Andrew Carnegie HousePittencrieff StreetDunfermlineKY12 8AWTel: +44 (0)1383 721445Fax: +44 (0)1383 749799Email: info@carnegieuk.orgwww.carnegieuktrust.org.uk Libraries are spaces in which peoplecan becreative, where groups canmeet to pursue ashared interestin arts and crafts, or where they canexplore new ways of communicating,usingnew technology, music or otherart forms. They can be venues forconcerts, exhibitions or performances,attracting new audiences. Theysupport self-expression in places wherethere are no other options. Their localhistory collections are at the heart ofcommunities defining themselves. OUTCOMES Through the kind of activitiesdescribed in the poster,libraries can help governmentsachieve their goals ofenriching the livesof individuals andcommunitiesplacing art and culture atthe heart of regenerationpromoting the socialand economic role of artsand culturecreating a vibrantcreative economy Libraries ascultural centres Libraries can inspire people through booksand literature, music, film and theatre. Library staff can help peopleunderstand and act oninformationwhich can make a real difference to their wellbeing – whether that is about their financialsituation, their health or about newtechnology.Governments throughout the UKand Ireland are committed totackling the things which stop people from reaching their full potential – things like illiteracy lack of skills the digital divide.These problems make it harder forpeople to make the most of theirlives, to find work and to enjoy life.They can also increase inequality,for example when people arenot able to make the most ofopportunities which are onlyavailable online, such as cheapergoods and services or access topublic services. OUTCOMES Examples on the poster showhow libraries can play a keyrole in achieving the outcomeswhich governments are seeking in this area – such as creating opportunitiestackling disadvantagecreating smarter citizenshelping everyone to reachtheir potentialmaking opportunity moreequalinvesting in the futureimproving skills foremployment They can do this by encouragingreading for pleasure, introducingyoung families to books and reading,running English language classes fornew citizens, and creating supportiveenvironments for children after school. Librariessupporting learning Public librariessupport learningat all stages of life,offering support for everyone from babies and smallchildren to older people. Libraries canconnect communitiesandchange lives. They providesafe spacesin the heart of theircommunities, and provide manyservices targeting people who areliving on a low income, people whoare lonely, unemployed, or elderly,and people with long term medicalconditions or disabilities.They can provide a single point ofaccess to a wide range ofpublicservices. Mobile libraries can helptackle rural isolation and socialexclusion, while services to olderpeople in care homes or to people whoare housebound provide importantsocial contact for those people.Libraries can provideinformationabout healthand health services,as well as books on prescription,while they can also be safe spacesfor voluntary sector organisations toprovide health information and advice. OUTCOMES In all these ways librariescontribute to government goals ofsafer and strongercommunitiesthriving neighbourhoodsa strong, shared communitytackling poverty and socialexclusionlonger, healthier livesreduced health inequalitiestackling disadvantage Libraries can support strongconnected communities, providingaccess to information aboutlocaland national issuesand providingspace for public meetings. Libraries at the heart ofstrong communities Libraries can be key partners in tackling the problemsofsocial isolation,inequality,disadvantage,fractured communities, andill health. Libraries helpjobseekersfindopportunities and preparethemselves for interview. Theyoffer courses anddigital skillstrainingwhich enable people toseek work. They can offer adviceand support for the developmentofsmall businesses. At the sametime, they can help people makethe most of the income they have.Libraries will provide essential supportfor people applying forwelfarebenefitsin the digital future. OUTCOMES Income and employmentare important indicators ofwellbeing. Libraries can be keypartners in addressing povertyand unemployment, helpinggovernments to achieve theirgoals ofgrowth and sustainablejobsa wealthier and fairercountryenabling business tocreate jobscreating sustainableeconomic growth Libraries promotingeconomic wellbeing Public libraries can be agencies for economicwellbeing in their communities. Speaking Volumes:the impact of public libraries on wellbeing Our analysis of wellbeing showsthat there are a number of so-called ‘ domains of wellbeing ’ which can be measured or monitored to explore theoverall levels of individual wellbeing.Many countries use different sets ofdomains to measure wellbeing, butthere is a huge amount of overlap.These are some of the key domainswhich libraries can have an impact on:The poster inside this leaflet containsmany examples of how libraries have animpact on wellbeing. We have groupedthe examples into four areas of publicpolicy, showing the potential whichexists for public libraries to really makea difference to the wellbeing of theircommunities.These examples have been selectedfrom a database of examples of goodpractice which we have drawn togetherfrom across the UK and Ireland.You can look at the examples whichsit behind the poster on our websiteatbit.ly/speakingvolsThis material has been drawn togetherby the Carnegie UK Trust to supportall those who are making the case forthe potential of public libraries in the21st century.Public libraries are safe spaces at theheart of our communities, providingcompletely free access to huge resourcesof information, knowledge andtechnology. They have dedicated staff andare well linked with other local services.To respond to the changing needs of the21st century, libraries are changing andmust continue to change. Libraries must bebrave, innovative and show how they aredoing things which really make a differenceto their community. It is also important tosell this story to those who hold the purse strings – to show how in the long term the library service can help save money. The Carnegie UK Trust was set up to promote thewellbeing of the people of the UK and Ireland, and webelieve that public libraries have enormous potential toimprove wellbeing in four broad areas of public policy:social, economic, cultural and education. The Challenge The challenge which publiclibraries face is to continue to bethe kind of places which AndrewCarnegie wanted when hefunded libraries places that give people achance, a second chance andeven a third chance places that improve thecommunities they are based in places that respond to theneeds of local people, givingthem the opportunity to livefuller lives, make more ofwhat they have, discover newworlds, and aspire to greaterthings Domains of wellbeing incomeemploymenteducation and learninghealthsocial connectionscivic engagementenvironment WELLBEING EDUCATIONSOCIALECONOMICCULTURAL Carnegie United Kingdom TrustScottish charity SC 012799operating in the UK and IrelandIncorporated by Royal Charter 1917 Library associal hub Tackling isolation services for older people, homeless people,disabled peopleoutreach to prisons and care homesoutreach to disadvantaged familiesservices for linguistic minoritiesservices for people suffering domestic abuse Library as community hub information about servicesaccess to public services Promotingenvironmentalawareness information aboutrecyclinginformation aboutvolunteering Promoting health information about health and health servicesbooks as therapyprovide community health services insafe environmentpartnerships with voluntary sector in library Connecting citizens information about local and national issuesspace for public meetingslegal services in the library Library ascultural centre Promoting literature author talks and book groupsbook festivalswriters in residencesupport for self-publishing Creative spaces maker spaces3D printersmedia workshops Local history resource access to family and local history materiallearning sessions on local and family historylocal people contributing to resources Library as cinema film clubs in librariesDVDs to hire Making music access to CDs and sheet musicyoung people making musicrhythm and rhyme for early yearslibrary as music venue Art, dance and drama space for exhibitions, plays and danceclasses and workshops Library aslearning hub Supporting literacy reading for pleasureSummer Reading Challengebreakfast clubs for hostel dwellerssupport for dyslexia English language language courses Early years and school age books for babieshomework support Digital literacy courses and support for all Lifelong learning filling the gaps in formal educationsupporting informal learningsignposting to adult learning Library aseconomic enabler Maximising income benefits information and supportmake the most of your incomeCAB services in librarysmart meter loans Encouraging enterprise advice and support for small businessesbusiness resources in librariessupport for social enterpriseproviding co-working spacesmaker spaces in libraries Access to employment job clubssupport for online job applicationsaccess to computers and wifisupporting digital skills WELLBEING EDUCATIONSOCIALECONOMICCULTURAL The Carnegie UK Trust works to improve thelives of people throughout the UK and Ireland,by changing minds through influencing policy,and by changing lives through innovativepractice and partnership work. The CarnegieUK Trust was established by Scots-Americanphilanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1913. Speaking Volumes: the impact of public libraries on wellbeing Andrew Carnegie HousePittencrieff StreetDunfermlineKY12 8AWTel: +44 (0)1383 721445Fax: +44 (0)1383 749799Email: info@carnegieuk.orgwww.carnegieuktrust.org.uk Libraries are spaces in which peoplecan becreative, where groups canmeet to pursue ashared interestin arts and crafts, or where they canexplore new ways of communicating,usingnew technology, music or otherart forms. They can be venues forconcerts, exhibitions or performances,attracting new audiences. Theysupport self-expression in places wherethere are no other options. Their localhistory collections are at the heart ofcommunities defining themselves. OUTCOMES Through the kind of activitiesdescribed in the poster,libraries can help governmentsachieve their goals ofenriching the livesof individuals andcommunitiesplacing art and culture atthe heart of regenerationpromoting the socialand economic role of artsand culturecreating a vibrantcreative economy Libraries ascultural centres Libraries can inspire people through booksand literature, music, film and theatre. Library staff can help peopleunderstand and act oninformationwhich can make a real difference to their wellbeing – whether that is about their financialsituation, their health or about newtechnology.Governments throughout the UKand Ireland are committed totackling the things which stop people from reaching their full potential – things like illiteracy lack of skills the digital divide.These problems make it harder forpeople to make the most of theirlives, to find work and to enjoy life.They can also increase inequality,for example when people arenot able to make the most ofopportunities which are onlyavailable online, such as cheapergoods and services or access topublic services. OUTCOMES Examples on the poster showhow libraries can play a keyrole in achieving the outcomeswhich governments are seeking in this area – such as creating opportunitiestackling disadvantagecreating smarter citizenshelping everyone to reachtheir potentialmaking opportunity moreequalinvesting in the futureimproving skills foremployment They can do this by encouragingreading for pleasure, introducingyoung families to books and reading,running English language classes fornew citizens, and creating supportiveenvironments for children after school. Librariessupporting learning Public librariessupport learningat all stages of life,offering support for everyone from babies and smallchildren to older people. Libraries canconnect communitiesandchange lives. They providesafe spacesin the heart of theircommunities, and provide manyservices targeting people who areliving on a low income, people whoare lonely, unemployed, or elderly,and people with long term medicalconditions or disabilities.They can provide a single point ofaccess to a wide range ofpublicservices. Mobile libraries can helptackle rural isolation and socialexclusion, while services to olderpeople in care homes or to people whoare housebound provide importantsocial contact for those people.Libraries can provideinformationabout healthand health services,as well as books on prescription,while they can also be safe spacesfor voluntary sector organisations toprovide health information and advice. OUTCOMES In all these ways librariescontribute to government goals ofsafer and strongercommunitiesthriving neighbourhoodsa strong, shared communitytackling poverty and socialexclusionlonger, healthier livesreduced health inequalitiestackling disadvantage Libraries can support strongconnected communities, providingaccess to information aboutlocaland national issuesand providingspace for public meetings. Libraries at the heart ofstrong communities Libraries can be key partners in tackling the problemsofsocial isolation,inequality,disadvantage,fractured communities, andill health. Libraries helpjobseekersfindopportunities and preparethemselves for interview. Theyoffer courses anddigital skillstrainingwhich enable people toseek work. They can offer adviceand support for the developmentofsmall businesses. At the sametime, they can help people makethe most of the income they have.Libraries will provide essential supportfor people applying forwelfarebenefitsin the digital future. OUTCOMES Income and employmentare important indicators ofwellbeing. Libraries can be keypartners in addressing povertyand unemployment, helpinggovernments to achieve theirgoals ofgrowth and sustainablejobsa wealthier and fairercountryenabling business tocreate jobscreating sustainableeconomic growth Libraries promotingeconomic wellbeing Public libraries can be agencies for economicwellbeing in their communities. Speaking Volumes:the impact of public libraries on wellbeing Our analysis of wellbeing showsthat there are a number of so-called ‘ domains of wellbeing ’ which can be measured or monitored to explore theoverall levels of individual wellbeing.Many countries use different sets ofdomains to measure wellbeing, butthere is a huge amount of overlap.These are some of the key domainswhich libraries can have an impact on:The poster inside this leaflet containsmany examples of how libraries have animpact on wellbeing. We have groupedthe examples into four areas of publicpolicy, showing the potential whichexists for public libraries to really makea difference to the wellbeing of theircommunities.These examples have been selectedfrom a database of examples of goodpractice which we have drawn togetherfrom across the UK and Ireland.You can look at the examples whichsit behind the poster on our websiteatbit.ly/speakingvolsThis material has been drawn togetherby the Carnegie UK Trust to supportall those who are making the case forthe potential of public libraries in the21st century.Public libraries are safe spaces at theheart of our communities, providingcompletely free access to huge resourcesof information, knowledge andtechnology. They have dedicated staff andare well linked with other local services.To respond to the changing needs of the21st century, libraries are changing andmust continue to change. Libraries must bebrave, innovative and show how they aredoing things which really make a differenceto their community. It is also important tosell this story to those who hold the purse strings – to show how in the long term the library service can help save money. The Carnegie UK Trust was set up to promote thewellbeing of the people of the UK and Ireland, and webelieve that public libraries have enormous potential toimprove wellbeing in four broad areas of public policy:social, economic, cultural and education. The Challenge The challenge which publiclibraries face is to continue to bethe kind of places which AndrewCarnegie wanted when hefunded libraries places that give people achance, a second chance andeven a third chance places that improve thecommunities they are based in places that respond to theneeds of local people, givingthem the opportunity to livefuller lives, make more ofwhat they have, discover newworlds, and aspire to greaterthings Domains of wellbeing incomeemploymenteducation and learninghealthsocial connectionscivic engagementenvironment WELLBEING EDUCATIONSOCIALECONOMICCULTURAL Carnegie United Kingdom TrustScottish charity SC 012799operating in the UK and IrelandIncorporated by Royal Charter 1917 http://www.carnegieuktrust.org.uk

3 Carnegie Library Lab Aim: Innovation and leadership UK and Republic of Ireland Early to mid-management individuals 3 years: 2014-2017 2 cohorts with 5-7 individuals per cohort Package: 1.Online learning programme 2.Innovative idea 3.Network 4.Support 5.Evaluation #librarylab #innovate

4 1. Online learning programme Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation Modules Mix of materials Learning guide Time commitment #librarylab #innovate

5 2. Innovative Idea £5,000-£15,000 “Innovation” Bring your own definition! Building and space Service delivery Activity/service Partnerships Need, legacy & feasibility Time commitment #librarylab #innovate

6 3. Network Face-to-face Online Informal #librarylab #innovate

7 4. Support Learning Guide Mentors Sponsors #librarylab #innovate

8 Legacy Online material to be taken on Cohort of people Innovative idea Evaluation #librarylab #innovate

9 Primary Criteria Innovative idea Impact Feasibility Personal attributes #librarylab #innovate

10 Balancing Criteria Geographical Target group Type of project Experience #librarylab #innovate

11 Advisory Group …and Linda Tomos, Director, CyMAL

12 Thank you Jenny Peachey - jennyp@carnegieuk.org


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