Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Has your Family Changed? Young People’s Accounts of Family Transitions Jan Pryor and Carla Crespo Roy McKenzie Centre for the Study of Families, Victoria.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Has your Family Changed? Young People’s Accounts of Family Transitions Jan Pryor and Carla Crespo Roy McKenzie Centre for the Study of Families, Victoria."— Presentation transcript:

1 Has your Family Changed? Young People’s Accounts of Family Transitions Jan Pryor and Carla Crespo Roy McKenzie Centre for the Study of Families, Victoria University of Wellington, and New Zealand Families Commission, Wellington, New Zealand. NCFR Meeting, Little Rock, Arkansas, 3rd-7 th November, 2008 Abstract This study reports 2000 young people’s accounts of family change over one year. Over 1/3 reported major structural change; 1/5 described significant loss of family members. Other changes included family dynamics, family finances, and new siblings. The study reveals remarkably high levels of family contextual change experienced by adolescents who are navigating the normal chaos of development and change at this stage of life. Participants Over 2000 young people were participants in the Youth Connectedness Project (YCP), a 3- year longitudinal study. These findings are from the young people’s responses to the question ‘Have there been any big changes in your family this year?’ The sample was representative of New Zealand’s population in regard to socioeconomic status, with Mäori youth oversampled (30%). Results Family Structural Change 33.7% of responses referred to major structural changes in their families: “Well I can’t cope with my mum and dad being split up because they have been together sooo long and it’s a BIG change for me….my Mum met this guy on the internet…now he’s living with me and my Mum and I really don’t want him to live with [us]…he has no respect for me.” ‘My mother got a new boyfriend it isn’t that big but it kinda is.’ Loss 21.5% of participants reported on the death of an extended family member - mostly grandparents. “…my Nana died and I feel really upset… and the thing is that when she died it was on the 1st of February and when it comes I have my memories.” Change in family dynamics (16.2%) These were both positive: “My parents are paying attention to me and my other family members and my parents do not fight so much.” And negative: “My mum has been getting into more fights with us lately I think she needs a little break.” transitions, and relationship development.For many, their homes are not havens of stability and support; the extent of real disruption is evident in the large proportion who described family change, conflict, and even violence. Notably, family structural change was most often reported; loss of grandparents was also frequent. The findings are eloquent testimony to the centrality of families in the lives of young people, even as they move towards increasing autonomy. Contact information : Jan Pryor: Changes in family finances Nearly 14% commented on this: Mum has hurt her foot so she couldn’t work as much which made us have less money than usual.” New siblings 9% reported this change: “I have a new baby sister…it really gets stupid because now I have to keep my door closed and it makes my room really hot.” Commentary These findings demonstrate the family contextual changes within which young people are experiencing the normative changes of puberty, school ‘more nd more family kumin in2 our home nd not enough room for us hu are family by birth…mah parents dnt spend much time with uz eni more… nd focus on my lil sister…!!! But wen evah we du go out 2gethah we nevah wnt 2 go to the same place as our parentz…I think they need 2 Understand mee abnd mah bruthar r grown up nd we dnt do that stuff we do eniimre!”


Download ppt "Has your Family Changed? Young People’s Accounts of Family Transitions Jan Pryor and Carla Crespo Roy McKenzie Centre for the Study of Families, Victoria."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google