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Understanding outcomes BLF’s approach to outcomes for applicants [Name of speaker] [Title]

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Presentation on theme: "Understanding outcomes BLF’s approach to outcomes for applicants [Name of speaker] [Title]"— Presentation transcript:

1 Understanding outcomes BLF’s approach to outcomes for applicants [Name of speaker] [Title]

2 This session will cover What BIG means by: project aim outcomes indicators activities

3 New online guide replaces ‘Explaining the difference your project makes’

4 Community learning and creating opportunity Promoting community cohesion and safety Promoting wellbeing Outcome People having better chances in life, with better access to training and development to improve their life skills Outcome Stronger communities, with more active citizens, working together to tackle their problems Outcome Improved rural and urban environments, which communities are better able to access and enjoy Outcome Healthier and more active people and communities Big Lottery Fund Outcomes

5 What BIG expects from applicants Identify the need for your project Develop an aim Develop outcomes Measure progress Work up activities Monitoring

6 Identifying the need Identify the need and explain it Evidence asking people own experience research local statistics

7 Project aim The project aim is the overall purpose of the project A project aim should be something that can be achieved For example: To improve young people’s health & involvement in the community

8 Project outcomes What needs to change for the project to achieve its aim? What difference will the project make for the beneficiaries? Big Lottery Fund will ask projects to identify up to 4 outcomes

9 ‘The door’ Imagine one of your beneficiaries walking through your door for the first time: What is a project outcome? What are they doing when they first come in? What are they doing differently at the end of the project?

10 18 years old, mental health issues, sits at home isolated from peers, lacks confidence, low self esteem, dropped out of education/training

11 Activities: Drop in/coffee and chat Accompanied walks to shops Hill walking IT training (games, surfing, music) Expert speakers 18 years old, mental health issues, sits at home isolated from peers, lacks confidence, low self esteem, dropped out of education/training

12 Activities: Drop in/coffee and chat Accompanied walks to shops Hill walking IT training (games, surfing, music) Expert speakers Project outcomes: Feels less isolated Increase in confidence Increased self esteem Increased understanding 18 years old, mental health issues, sits at home isolated from peers, lacks confidence, low self esteem, dropped out of education/training

13 Activities: Drop in/coffee and chat Accompanied walks to shops Hill walking IT training (games, surfing, music) Expert speakers Programme outcomes: Healthier and more active people People having better chances in life Project outcomes: Feels less isolated Increase in confidence Increased self esteem Increased understanding 18 years old, mental health issues, sits at home isolated from peers, lacks confidence, low self esteem, dropped out of education/training Link to

14 Activities: Drop in/coffee and chat Accompanied walks to shops Hill walking IT training (games, surfing, music) Expert speakers Programme outcomes: Healthier and more active people People having better chances in life Project outcomes: Feels less isolated Increase in confidence Increased self esteem Increased understanding 18 years old, mental health issues, sits at home isolated from peers, lacks confidence, low self esteem, dropped out of education/training Link to

15 Project outcomes Use words that indicate change like ‘more,’ ‘better,’ ‘increased,’ ‘reduced,’ ‘improved’ For example: Increased self-confidence of people with disabilities to manage and make changes in their lives Minority ethnic older people in the borough experience improved psychological and physical wellbeing

16 Outcomes quiz 1.Set up and advertise training courses. 2.Young people have reduced or stopped using drugs 3.Run a befriending service for disaffected young people 4.Children with ASD in the city will have better quality play provision with their peers because of specialised support 5.Build a village hall 6.Older people report reduced isolation through volunteering 7.Low income families eat more fruit and vegetables 8.Recruit volunteers 9.The involvement of residents in regular recycling and environmental activities will result in refurbished green spaces.

17 Tracking Progress Indicators (identifying signs of change) Both activities and indicators will need to be specific and measurable to deliver and measure outcomes Project outcomeIndicatorLevelTimescale Fewer young people will be admitted to hospital as a result of alcohol misuse Number of young people who feel able to engage with project workers to discuss their problems 75 young people By year one, month six Number of young people who have a better understanding of the effects of misusing alcohol 75 young people 100 more young people each year By the end of year one At the end of years two and three Number of young people admitted to hospital as a result of alcohol misuse 30 fewer young people At the end of the project

18 Project activities What will you do to bring about your planned outcomes? What tasks and services will you carry out? Use doing words to describe your activities. For example: provide, run, promote Example: Run a weekly evening circuit training class for 20 young people during term time.

19 Outcomes The difference you intend to make for your beneficiaries Aim The overall aim of your project Activities What those working on your project will actually do, week by week.

20 Aim Young people positively engaged in the community Activities Hold 5 community action days Recruit and train 20 young people as volunteers Start and facilitate a weekly youth club at the community centre Outcome Young people demonstrate improved social skills, self confidence and motivation

21 Planning Triangle Exercise 1. Consider the scenario given to your group. 2. Use the outcomes triangle and in your group decide –a project aim –2-4 project outcomes –activities. 3. Choose someone from your group to feedback your ideas at the end

22 Learning Important to think about how you learn from your project's achievements or the experience of running your project and what you do with that information. Monitoring and evaluation

23 Outcomes Star

24 Planning your application: the project journey exercise You have been given headings for each of the key project planning stages. The headings relating to need and learning have examples already attached. In your groups: Sort the headings into a logical order in which you might plan a project Match the example aim, outcomes, indicators and activities to the relevant headings

25 Planning your application: the project journey OutcomesAim EvidenceProblemCause Need IndicatorsActivitiesLearning

26 Further help Big Advice Line ‘Getting funding and planning successful projects’ - BIG’s guide to using an outcomes approach available at


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