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YOUNG PEOPLE & THE LAW Planning, delivering and recording Young People & the Law youth work.

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Presentation on theme: "YOUNG PEOPLE & THE LAW Planning, delivering and recording Young People & the Law youth work."— Presentation transcript:

1 YOUNG PEOPLE & THE LAW Planning, delivering and recording Young People & the Law youth work

2 Guidance Notes HOW TO USE THIS PACK: HOW TO DOWNLOAD: To download from website: Click on the link to the pack you want to download From the dialogue box, choose to ‘open’ or ‘save’ the file then click OK The pack will open as a slideshow: all links are live but you will need to left click to advance through the pack. Choose PRINT from the drop down FILE menu to print all or some of the pages (see below) Choose SAVE AS from the drop down FILE menu to save a copy to your hard drive HOW TO PRINT (NOTE – THERE IS NO NEED TO PRINT THE ENTIRE PACK, ONLY INDIVIDUAL SLIDES WITH ACTIVITIY SHEETS): Before printing, delete ‘Index’ arrows by selecting and then pressing DELETE Individual slides can be printed by selecting individual slide numbers or ranges in the PRINT menu To print slides in black & white or grayscale, select the relevant option from the Colour/Grayscale drop down menu when you are about to print HOW TO VIEW LINKS/USE SLIDES These slides may be used to form part of a presentation – press F5 to view as a slideshow To delete individual slides, click on them to select then click on ‘cut’ in the Edit menu To make links ‘live’ you will need to view the pack as a SLIDESHOW – go to the ‘View’ menu or press F5 If you have any comments regarding this pack, or need any additional help in using it, please contact: SUZANNAH YOUDE: or tel: All information in this pack was correct and all links active at time of upload but may be subject to change

3 Introduction Effective youth work within the context of young people and the law should take account of young people’s understanding of the law and how it effects them. Because of the specific nature of some of the issues involved, work in this area is an ideal opportunity for delivery in partnership with a range of agencies particularly YOS. This pack provides templates for recording, accrediting and evaluating this work, as well as some simple introductory activities in the form of activity sheets and ideas for some more in depth work on the themes and issues. There is also a review of some of the work going on around the county in this area. You should all have a copy of the Vanessa Rogers books – the ‘Citizenship’ book has some excellent resources to use to plan delivery in the wider context of citizenship and safety. Although specific legal information may now be out of date and require fact checking, there are plenty of activities that can be used to encourage young people to think about the issues, think about their rights and responsibilities and recognise how the law is there to help them, their families and communities. A NOTE ON CONFIDENTIALITY: Legally, there are certain circumstances when youth workers cannot maintain confidentiality – these are: When the young person is in a life threatening situation e.g. self harm, threats from an abuser Where a young person’s actions may cause significant harm to someone else When a young person is ill or injured and needs immediate medical attention When a young person has committed a terrorist act If you feel you have additional training needs associated with delivering youth work around these issues, go to Kent CPD Online and search ‘Young People & the Law’ for relevant courses.http://cpdonline.kenttrustweb.org.uk/cpd/default.asp?sid

4 Get to know young people Ask young people what issues they want to explore e.g. Knife crime, bullying, discrimination NEED Set goals & targets with young people e.g. Can we develop an anti bullying strategy for our centre? AIMS & OBJECTIVES Find out what resources you have and will need e.g. Partner agencies, young people’s knowledge & expertise METHODS Agree on a timetable of work with young people METHOD Carry out the programme and review with young people as you go e.g. Evaluate each session with an informal discussion IMPLEMENTATION Use evaluation tools to find out what young people thought about it e.g. Formal evaluation using survey monkey, blogs, reports, video & photographic evidence EVALUATION Celebrate what you did and discuss how you could do it better next time! Curriculum Planning Model Equality & Diversity Participation & Empowerment Informal EducationFun Personal & Social Development

5 Young People & the Law: Aims AIMS: Youth work that focuses on young people and the law should: Recognise young people’s rights and responsibilities within the law Look at issues of right and wrong and explore the consequences of young people’s actions Look at how the law is there to help young people, their families and communities Encourage young people to be aware of the different types of law: criminal, civil, health & safety, discrimination, consumer, employment & disability Encourage young people to think about themselves as responsible members of society Help young people to develop strategies to stay safe from bullying, discrimination, crime and anti social behaviour and Inform young people of the legal age limits for sex, smoking and drinking Signpost young people to agencies that can help them if they’re in trouble with the law or need legal advice Youth work that focuses on young people and the law should aim to show the following progression: Rights & responsibilities of the individual Understanding the consequences of your actions Recognising that the law is there to help you & your community Knowing where to go for information on legal issues

6 Young People & the Law: Outcomes OUTCOMES: Youth workers should be able to deliver a programme of work with the following outcomes: Young people will have knowledge of the law and the agencies that can offer legal advice to young people Young people will be aware of the importance of confidentiality and the circumstances under which information may be shared with the police Young people will be aware of their rights and responsibilities and will understand the consequences of their actions Young people will recognise that the law is there to help them and will have at least a basic understanding of the laws that exist to protect young people, their families and communities

7 YOUNG PEOPLE & THE LAW YOUTH WORK PLANNING SHEET Signed: ___________________________________ Date: ________ SESSION THEME: AIMS & OBJECTIVES: UNDERSTANDING & AWARENESS OF ISSUES: Methods: Resources: LINKING PERSONAL ISSUES TO SOCIAL ISSUES: Methods: Resources: MAKING INFORMED CHOICES: Methods: Resources: DEVELOPING UNDERSTANDING OF THE LAW: Methods: Resources: RIGHTS, RESPONSIBILITIES & CONSEQUENCES: Methods: Resources: DIVERSITY, EQUALITY & RESPECT FOR OTHERS: Methods: Resources: ACTIVITY:TIMING:OUTCOMES:

8 Activity Resources citizenship lesson plans with transferable activities Up is a moderated forum for under 18s to discuss citizenship issues Centre for Citizenship & the Law has a range of activities & information for young people htm Becal lesson plan on what the law is & why it’s necessary has a searchable resource database – try keywords like Law kids.direct.gov.uk/resource_areas/html/ MainHomePage.aspx Kids Direct.Gov has a wealth of resources for exploring issues around law, citizenship and community video on young people’s rights 2.pdf Citizenship Foundation mock trial resource is well detailed & gives ideas for running a variety of mock trials activities around the law & alcohol and substance abuse ?434 Citizenship Foundation has a range of resources

9 Legal Ages Quiz 1)From what age can you have your own bank account? A: 10B: 5C: From birth 2) If it's okay with your parents how old must you be to get married? A: 11B: 16C: 21 3) If you're younger than 16, can you buy fireworks without an adult being there? Yes/No 4) How old do you have to be to buy cigarettes? A: 21B: 18C: 16 5) From what age can you start to vote in an election? A: 16B: 17C: 18 6) Can 12-year-olds buy pets on their own? A: YesB: No, they must have an adult with them 7) At what age can you officially change your name? A: 16B: 21C: 35 8) How old to you have to be to get a tattoo? A: 16B: 17C: 18 9) At the moment, from what age can you learn to drive? A: 17B: 18C: 21 10) From what age can you buy alcohol? A: 16B: 18C: 21 11) And from what age can you drink alcohol in a pub? A: The age you can buy itB: 16+ with a meal if bought by an adult 12) At what age can you legally drink alcohol at home A: 5B: 12C: There is no age limit

10 Legal Ages Quiz – Answers 1)From what age can you have your own bank account? C: From birth, but there are restrictions on the kind of account you can have 2) If it's okay with your parents how old must you be to get married? B: 16 3) If you're younger than 16, can you buy fireworks without an adult being there? No – the minimum age is 18 4) How old do you have to be to buy cigarettes? B: 18 5) From what age can you start to vote in an election? C: 18 6) Can 12-year-olds buy pets on their own? B: No, they must have an adult with them – the legal age at which you can buy a pet is 16 7) At what age can you officially change your name? A: 16, any one over 16 can change any part of their name at any time 8) How old to you have to be to get a tattoo? C: 18 9) At the moment, from what age can you learn to drive? A: 17, you can apply for a provisional licence up to 3 months before your birthday but can only take the theory test on or after your birthday 10) From what age can you buy alcohol? B: 18, though in an off licence or supermarket you can be challenged to produce ID if you look under 21 11) And from what age can you drink alcohol in a pub? B: 16+ with a meal if bought by an adult – this only relates to beer, cider and wine 12) At what age can you legally drink alcohol at home A: 5, though evidence suggests that the younger a child starts to drink alcohol, the more likely they are to have alcohol related problems

11 Legal Wordsearches Test your knowledge of consumer, criminal and discrimination law CRIMINAL ASBO DEFENCE DETENTION JUSTICE OFFENDER PROSECUTION SENTENCING SUPERVISION YOUNG CONSUMER ALCOHOL CIGARETTES CONTRACT CREDIT GOODS GUARANTEE REFUND RIGHTS SERVICES DISCRIMINATION AGE DISABILITY EQUALITY GENDER HATE CRIME PROTECTED RELIGION RIGHTS SEXUALITY

12 Complete the chain Do you know what happens when someone breaks the law? Can you put the statements in order and complete the chain? CHARGESGO TO COURT REMANDBREAK THE LAW SENTENCINGGET READY FOR COURT

13 Complete the Chain The correct order is: 1.Break the law 2.Charges – the police can: let you go, ask a magistrate for 24 hours for extra questioning, bring charges 3.Remand – you will either be remanded in custody (locked up) or remanded on bail (you’re free to go but someone pays money to guarantee you’ll appear in court) 4.Get ready for court – you’ll talk to a solicitor about what exactly happened so you can prepare your case for court 5.Go to court – either a magistrates court with no jury (for most, lesser crimes) or Crown court with a jury (for the most serious crimes like murder) 6.Sentencing – if you’re guilty the judge will decide on your sentence which could be a suspended sentence (no jail time but reporting to a probation officer), community service, fine or prison

14 What’s Worst? Rank these crimes from in order from least serious to most serious: think about the harm they cause now and the future results for the victims and the criminals, the effect they have on the victim and the effect they have on society Secretly taking a photo of someone with a mobile MurderSelling illegal drugs ShopliftingPunching someone Bank robbery Dangerous driving

15 Civil or Criminal? CIVIL LAW: a dispute between two people, when someone feels damage has been done to them e.g. your new MP3 player breaks after 2 weeks CRIMINAL LAW: when a law is broken and someone commits a crime against society as a whole e.g. murder, theft Where do these scenarios fit? Write them under civil or criminal: Builders working on your youth centre don’t complete the work they say they will. People keep using your garden as a shortcut. You see someone attacking a man in the street. Your friend’s mum & dad split up and can’t agree who looks after the kids. Someone at school is harassing another pupil even though they have an ASBO to stop them. Your best mate is carrying heroin. You download music from the internet without paying. Your mate takes a CD from a shop. Your dad drove himself home from the pub when drunk. A mate carries a knife in case he gets attacked. You have noisy neighbours from hell.

16 Civil or Criminal? Answers Builders working on your youth centre don’t complete the work they say they will CIVIL Breach of contract People keep using your garden as a shortcut CIVIL Trespass You see someone attacking a man in the street CRIMINAL Assault occasioning actual bodily harm Your friend’s mum & dad split up and can’t agree who looks after the kids CIVIL Family law/custody Someone at school is harassing another pupil even though they have an ASBO to stop them CRIMINAL breaking an Anti Social Behaviour Order Your best mate is carrying heroin CRIMINAL possession of an illegal drug You download music from the internet without paying CIVIL copyright law/piracy Your mate takes a CD from a shop CRIMINAL Theft Your dad drove himself home from the pub when drunk CRIMINAL Driving whilst under the influence of alcohol A mate carries a knife in case he gets attacked CRIMINAL carrying an offensive weapon You have noisy neighbours from hell CIVIL Nuisance

17 Recording Young People & the Law Youth Work Below you’ll find a sample sheet for capturing recorded outcomes that may result from using this pack. Please refer to the aims of youth work focusing on young people and the law when measuring young people’s achievements. ‘Recorded outcomes’ must have the following features: Provide evidence to show actions undertaken by the young person, their progression, and distance travelled – to show distance travelled the record must identify starting points, describe the process/identify what happened, and be clear about the achievement, learning gain or end product. This may include, for instance, a decision made as a result of counselling or a detached work encounter. Provide evidence of the benefit derived by the young person as a result of a youth work intervention. Be evidenced (though not necessarily accredited) by a youth worker or an external awarding body. Be meaningful (not just a narrative of events) – it must confirm the achievement of a declared objective that is significant for that individual young person. Some subjective judgments will need to be made in assessing what constitutes a ‘significant’ objective for each young person, given their backgrounds and skill levels. Be recognisable within Ofsted frameworks for inspection A ‘recorded outcome’ DOES NOT: have to subscribe to a specific format; necessarily lead to an accredited outcome – a recorded outcome may be sufficient alone for some young people. For others it may form part of the learning journey towards an accredited outcome have to be measured against a declared curriculum, but it can be good practice to do so. Youth work that focuses on young people and the law can be accredited through: DUKE OF EDINBURGH’S AWARD please contact for more details YOUTH ACHIEVEMENT AWARD visit for more informationhttp://www.ukyouth.org/whatwedo/Programmes/YAA

18 Recording Young People & the Law Youth Work RECORDED OUTCOMES CHECKLIST (a recorded outcome MUST satisfy evidence & achievement criteria): EVIDENCE Do you have evidence of young person’s progression and distance travelled?YES/NO Do you have evidence of the way a young person has benefitted from a youth work intervention? YES/NO Have you or an external body evidenced this recorded outcome?YES/NO ACHIEVEMENT Has the young person achieved their objective?YES/NO GOOD PRACTICE (OPTIONAL) Has it been measured against the aims stated in the curriculum?YES/NO Can it lead to an accredited outcome?YES/NO

19 Recorded Outcomes Recorded by: __________________________________________________ Date: _______________________________________ Young Person’s Name Details of Recorded OutcomesSigned by young person Signed by youth worker Starting point Youth work intervention Outcome(s) for young person Starting point Youth work intervention Outcome(s) for young person Starting point Youth work intervention Outcome(s) for young person


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