Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Welcome to Kindergarten Curriculum Night Language Arts – 90 minutes Math – 60 minutes S.S., Sci., Health – 30 minutes Writing – 15 minutes Quiet time.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Welcome to Kindergarten Curriculum Night Language Arts – 90 minutes Math – 60 minutes S.S., Sci., Health – 30 minutes Writing – 15 minutes Quiet time."— Presentation transcript:

1

2 Welcome to Kindergarten Curriculum Night

3 Language Arts – 90 minutes Math – 60 minutes S.S., Sci., Health – 30 minutes Writing – 15 minutes Quiet time – 30 minutes Snack & activity – 15 minutes Free Choice – 30 minutes Morning Business – 25 minutes P.E. – 30 minutes Music – 30 minutes (3 days a week) Art – 30 minutes (2 days per week) Computer – 30 minutes (1 day per week) Library – 30 minutes (1 day per week) A Kindergarten Day

4 Language Arts O Sharing Literature O Big books and library books shared whole group O Models fluent reading behavior O Builds student’s vocabularies and concepts O Builds background knowledge by introducing children to new ideas and expanding on familiar concepts. O Exposes students to different text structures. O Phonemic Awareness O Understanding that spoken words are made of individual sounds. O Helps students learn to read and spell. O Examples: Phoneme isolation, phoneme identity, categorization, blending, segmentation, deletion, addition, substitution. O Word Blending O Word blending and word building are essential O Students are taught the process of blending individual sounds into words. Ex: VC (at) CVC (cat)

5 Writing O “Brave” Spelling (also known as inventive spelling) O Journaling O Concepts of Print O Modeled and in journaling O Using resources (environmental print) O Copying print O D’Nealian Print O Encouraging practice O Shared writing O Morning message and class stories O Introduction to various forms of writing O Letter writing O Stories O Expository

6 Examples of Developmental Writing O Stage 1 Drawing/Picture Writing: In the drawing and picture writing stage, children begin to express their thoughts and feelings, the pictures are usually unrecognizable. Stage 1 Drawing/Picture Writing: O Stage 2 Scribbling: At this stage, the child begins to draw somewhat recognizable shapes and may tell about the picture. The child may try to imitate writing, as well. Stage 2 Scribbling: O Stage 3 Random Letters: The child begins to print his or her own name and may put strings of letter with his/her picture. They may attempt to read the message, but it is probably still unrecognizable Stage 3 Random Letters: O Stage 4 Semi-phonetic(Early Spelling) : The child begins to use some letters to match sounds, often using a beginning letter to represent the whole word. They may begin to use left to right progression, but letter reversals are still common. Stage 4 Semi-phonetic(Early Spelling) O Stage 5 Phonetic : At this stage, children begin to write words with beginning and ending sounds. They also begin to spell some high frequency words correctly. Vowels may be inserted into words, but usually aren’t the right ones. Stage 5 Phonetic : O Stage 6 Transitional Spelling : At this stage, children are writing words the way they sound. They are beginning to leave spaces between words and spell many high frequency words correctly. They use punctuation marks, sometimes correctly. They begin to write one or more sentences. Stage 6 Transitional Spelling : O Stage 7 Conventional Spelling: At this level children spell most words correctly, though phonetic based spelling still comes into play when they must spell longer words. They begin to use punctuation marks correctly and use capital and lower case letters in the correct places.. Sources: Early Literacy Assessment McGraw Hill Publishing, 1997 Kd Writing Eileen G. Feidus and Isabel Cardonick, Wright Group Pub., 1999 Invitations Reggie Routman, Heinemann Pub Stage 7 Conventional Spelling:

7 Stage 1

8 Examples of Developmental Writing O Stage 1 Drawing/Picture Writing: In the drawing and picture writing stage, children begin to express their thoughts and feelings, the pictures are usually unrecognizable. Stage 1 Drawing/Picture Writing: O Stage 2 Scribbling: At this stage, the child begins to draw somewhat recognizable shapes and may tell about the picture. The child may try to imitate writing, as well. Stage 2 Scribbling: O Stage 3 Random Letters: The child begins to print his or her own name and may put strings of letter with his/her picture. They may attempt to read the message, but it is probably still unrecognizable Stage 3 Random Letters: O Stage 4 Semi-phonetic(Early Spelling) : The child begins to use some letters to match sounds, often using a beginning letter to represent the whole word. They may begin to use left to right progression, but letter reversals are still common. Stage 4 Semi-phonetic(Early Spelling) O Stage 5 Phonetic : At this stage, children begin to write words with beginning and ending sounds. They also begin to spell some high frequency words correctly. Vowels may be inserted into words, but usually aren’t the right ones. Stage 5 Phonetic : O Stage 6 Transitional Spelling : At this stage, children are writing words the way they sound. They are beginning to leave spaces between words and spell many high frequency words correctly. They use punctuation marks, sometimes correctly. They begin to write one or more sentences. Stage 6 Transitional Spelling : O Stage 7 Conventional Spelling: At this level children spell most words correctly, though phonetic based spelling still comes into play when they must spell longer words. They begin to use punctuation marks correctly and use capital and lower case letters in the correct places.. Sources: Early Literacy Assessment McGraw Hill Publishing, 1997 Kd Writing Eileen G. Feidus and Isabel Cardonick, Wright Group Pub., 1999 Invitations Reggie Routman, Heinemann Pub Stage 7 Conventional Spelling:

9 Stage 2

10 Examples of Developmental Writing O Stage 1 Drawing/Picture Writing: In the drawing and picture writing stage, children begin to express their thoughts and feelings, the pictures are usually unrecognizable. Stage 1 Drawing/Picture Writing: O Stage 2 Scribbling: At this stage, the child begins to draw somewhat recognizable shapes and may tell about the picture. The child may try to imitate writing, as well. Stage 2 Scribbling: O Stage 3 Random Letters: The child begins to print his or her own name and may put strings of letter with his/her picture. They may attempt to read the message, but it is probably still unrecognizable Stage 3 Random Letters: O Stage 4 Semi-phonetic(Early Spelling) : The child begins to use some letters to match sounds, often using a beginning letter to represent the whole word. They may begin to use left to right progression, but letter reversals are still common. Stage 4 Semi-phonetic(Early Spelling) O Stage 5 Phonetic : At this stage, children begin to write words with beginning and ending sounds. They also begin to spell some high frequency words correctly. Vowels may be inserted into words, but usually aren’t the right ones. Stage 5 Phonetic : O Stage 6 Transitional Spelling : At this stage, children are writing words the way they sound. They are beginning to leave spaces between words and spell many high frequency words correctly. They use punctuation marks, sometimes correctly. They begin to write one or more sentences. Stage 6 Transitional Spelling : O Stage 7 Conventional Spelling: At this level children spell most words correctly, though phonetic based spelling still comes into play when they must spell longer words. They begin to use punctuation marks correctly and use capital and lower case letters in the correct places.. Sources: Early Literacy Assessment McGraw Hill Publishing, 1997 Kd Writing Eileen G. Feidus and Isabel Cardonick, Wright Group Pub., 1999 Invitations Reggie Routman, Heinemann Pub Stage 7 Conventional Spelling:

11 Stage 3

12 Examples of Developmental Writing O Stage 1 Drawing/Picture Writing: In the drawing and picture writing stage, children begin to express their thoughts and feelings, the pictures are usually unrecognizable. Stage 1 Drawing/Picture Writing: O Stage 2 Scribbling: At this stage, the child begins to draw somewhat recognizable shapes and may tell about the picture. The child may try to imitate writing, as well. Stage 2 Scribbling: O Stage 3 Random Letters: The child begins to print his or her own name and may put strings of letter with his/her picture. They may attempt to read the message, but it is probably still unrecognizable Stage 3 Random Letters: O Stage 4 Semi-phonetic(Early Spelling) : The child begins to use some letters to match sounds, often using a beginning letter to represent the whole word. They may begin to use left to right progression, but letter reversals are still common. Stage 4 Semi-phonetic(Early Spelling) O Stage 5 Phonetic : At this stage, children begin to write words with beginning and ending sounds. They also begin to spell some high frequency words correctly. Vowels may be inserted into words, but usually aren’t the right ones. Stage 5 Phonetic : O Stage 6 Transitional Spelling : At this stage, children are writing words the way they sound. They are beginning to leave spaces between words and spell many high frequency words correctly. They use punctuation marks, sometimes correctly. They begin to write one or more sentences. Stage 6 Transitional Spelling : O Stage 7 Conventional Spelling: At this level children spell most words correctly, though phonetic based spelling still comes into play when they must spell longer words. They begin to use punctuation marks correctly and use capital and lower case letters in the correct places.. Sources: Early Literacy Assessment McGraw Hill Publishing, 1997 Kd Writing Eileen G. Feidus and Isabel Cardonick, Wright Group Pub., 1999 Invitations Reggie Routman, Heinemann Pub Stage 7 Conventional Spelling:

13 Stage 4

14 Examples of Developmental Writing O Stage 1 Drawing/Picture Writing: In the drawing and picture writing stage, children begin to express their thoughts and feelings, the pictures are usually unrecognizable. Stage 1 Drawing/Picture Writing: O Stage 2 Scribbling: At this stage, the child begins to draw somewhat recognizable shapes and may tell about the picture. The child may try to imitate writing, as well. Stage 2 Scribbling: O Stage 3 Random Letters: The child begins to print his or her own name and may put strings of letter with his/her picture. They may attempt to read the message, but it is probably still unrecognizable Stage 3 Random Letters: O Stage 4 Semi-phonetic(Early Spelling) : The child begins to use some letters to match sounds, often using a beginning letter to represent the whole word. They may begin to use left to right progression, but letter reversals are still common. Stage 4 Semi-phonetic(Early Spelling) O Stage 5 Phonetic : At this stage, children begin to write words with beginning and ending sounds. They also begin to spell some high frequency words correctly. Vowels may be inserted into words, but usually aren’t the right ones. Stage 5 Phonetic : O Stage 6 Transitional Spelling : At this stage, children are writing words the way they sound. They are beginning to leave spaces between words and spell many high frequency words correctly. They use punctuation marks, sometimes correctly. They begin to write one or more sentences. Stage 6 Transitional Spelling : O Stage 7 Conventional Spelling: At this level children spell most words correctly, though phonetic based spelling still comes into play when they must spell longer words. They begin to use punctuation marks correctly and use capital and lower case letters in the correct places.. Sources: Early Literacy Assessment McGraw Hill Publishing, 1997 Kd Writing Eileen G. Feidus and Isabel Cardonick, Wright Group Pub., 1999 Invitations Reggie Routman, Heinemann Pub Stage 7 Conventional Spelling:

15 Stage 5

16 Examples of Developmental Writing O Stage 1 Drawing/Picture Writing: In the drawing and picture writing stage, children begin to express their thoughts and feelings, the pictures are usually unrecognizable. Stage 1 Drawing/Picture Writing: O Stage 2 Scribbling: At this stage, the child begins to draw somewhat recognizable shapes and may tell about the picture. The child may try to imitate writing, as well. Stage 2 Scribbling: O Stage 3 Random Letters: The child begins to print his or her own name and may put strings of letter with his/her picture. They may attempt to read the message, but it is probably still unrecognizable Stage 3 Random Letters: O Stage 4 Semi-phonetic(Early Spelling) : The child begins to use some letters to match sounds, often using a beginning letter to represent the whole word. They may begin to use left to right progression, but letter reversals are still common. Stage 4 Semi-phonetic(Early Spelling) O Stage 5 Phonetic : At this stage, children begin to write words with beginning and ending sounds. They also begin to spell some high frequency words correctly. Vowels may be inserted into words, but usually aren’t the right ones. Stage 5 Phonetic : O Stage 6 Transitional Spelling : At this stage, children are writing words the way they sound. They are beginning to leave spaces between words and spell many high frequency words correctly. They use punctuation marks, sometimes correctly. They begin to write one or more sentences. Stage 6 Transitional Spelling : O Stage 7 Conventional Spelling: At this level children spell most words correctly, though phonetic based spelling still comes into play when they must spell longer words. They begin to use punctuation marks correctly and use capital and lower case letters in the correct places.. Sources: Early Literacy Assessment McGraw Hill Publishing, 1997 Kd Writing Eileen G. Feidus and Isabel Cardonick, Wright Group Pub., 1999 Invitations Reggie Routman, Heinemann Pub Stage 7 Conventional Spelling:

17 Stage 6

18 Examples of Developmental Writing O Stage 1 Drawing/Picture Writing: In the drawing and picture writing stage, children begin to express their thoughts and feelings, the pictures are usually unrecognizable. Stage 1 Drawing/Picture Writing: O Stage 2 Scribbling: At this stage, the child begins to draw somewhat recognizable shapes and may tell about the picture. The child may try to imitate writing, as well. Stage 2 Scribbling: O Stage 3 Random Letters: The child begins to print his or her own name and may put strings of letter with his/her picture. They may attempt to read the message, but it is probably still unrecognizable Stage 3 Random Letters: O Stage 4 Semi-phonetic(Early Spelling) : The child begins to use some letters to match sounds, often using a beginning letter to represent the whole word. They may begin to use left to right progression, but letter reversals are still common. Stage 4 Semi-phonetic(Early Spelling) O Stage 5 Phonetic : At this stage, children begin to write words with beginning and ending sounds. They also begin to spell some high frequency words correctly. Vowels may be inserted into words, but usually aren’t the right ones. Stage 5 Phonetic : O Stage 6 Transitional Spelling : At this stage, children are writing words the way they sound. They are beginning to leave spaces between words and spell many high frequency words correctly. They use punctuation marks, sometimes correctly. They begin to write one or more sentences. Stage 6 Transitional Spelling : O Stage 7 Conventional Spelling: At this level children spell most words correctly, though phonetic based spelling still comes into play when they must spell longer words. They begin to use punctuation marks correctly and use capital and lower case letters in the correct places.. Sources: Early Literacy Assessment McGraw Hill Publishing, 1997 Kd Writing Eileen G. Feidus and Isabel Cardonick, Wright Group Pub., 1999 Invitations Reggie Routman, Heinemann Pub Stage 7 Conventional Spelling:

19 Stage 7

20 Guided Reading O Children are grouped with students reading at about the same level and sharing similar instructional needs O These groups may change as the children progress O Children practice strategies with the teacher’s support leading to independent reading O Beginning Reading Strategies O These strategies are used throughout the primary grades to help children when they come to words they don’t know O Children are encouraged to use these strategies instead of relying on “sounding out”

21 Stations O ABC and or Word Study – working with words and or letters O Cutting out words from magazines, matching uppercase and or lowercase, finding words with certain letters in them, etc. O Buddy Reading – silent reading O Looking at pictures, reading with another students quietly O “Read the Room” finding words throughout the room and writing them down O Handwriting – different activities that we use to work on handwriting O Blends O Poetry – Finding letters and or words that we know in poems, circling uppercase and or lowercase letters O Overhead – variety of different activities done on the overhead O Word Searches O Drawing “detailed” pictures O Finding letters O Practice handwriting O Listening – Listen to a book on tape and complete the follow-up activity O Favorite Character O Setting O Writing the Title and Author O Writing about your favorite part O Drama – Creating a play with puppets (theatre) O Writing Station – Writing in our journals, writing words around the room O Use fun pens and or pencils and or markers to write O Write about a specific activity O Pocket Chart – Using the pocket chart to perform a variety of activities O Matching Rhyming Words together O Making Silly Sentences O Blends O Blocks – making a variety of different buildings with blocks O Math – working with numbers, patterns, etc. O Puzzles and Games – putting together a puzzle or playing a learning game O Creation – Making things that revolve around a lesson O Make your own book O Make a picture that starts with a certain word O Make a web O Housekeeping O Working with words/items that are related to food and kitchen items. O Taking orders, Working in a restaurant

22 Mackeben Read–At–Home Program O It is important to read with your child every night-this includes your child reading to you and you reading to your child. O Reading at home is expected as part of their nightly homework routine-this reinforces skills your child has learned throughout the school day O Parents are responsible for writing the titles of the books read nightly in the child’s assignment notebook or on the monthly calendar. This will be used for proof of participation in our many read-at home incentive programs (Rush to Read, Ozzie Reading Club, Six Flags Great America, Pizza Hut Read it coupons and our monthly awards from our neighborhood businesses) O Remember to… O Sit side by side O Encourage use of strategies O Have child retell the story O Read story more than once O Ask questions about the story

23

24 Math O Everyday Math O Contains hands-on activities that include games, whole group and small group activities. O Number recognition O Number writing 0-20 O Symmetry O Shape Recognition O Coin Identification and value O Calendar (days of the week, months of the year) O One to one correspondence O Counting by 1’s, 5’s, and 10’s to 100. O Simple data collection and graphing. O Measurement O Telling time O Calculator Skills O Understanding equivalence (ex. 6 as 2+4, 5+1, 7-1) O Patterning O Math links contain reinforcement activities to be completed at home.

25 Science O Life Science O Living and Non-living O Animals (Chicks) O Plants O Physical Science O Matter (solid vs. liquid) O Movement O Earth Science O Earth and Sky O Weather O Caring for the Earth O Human Body O Five Senses O Growing and Changing O Healthy Habits and Dental Health

26 Social Studies, Science, Health O Beginning of the Year (1 st half) O School Friends O Different feelings about school. O Identify ways to get along with others. O Manners O Food Nutrition O Identify the needs for food. O Food pyramid O Families O All families are different and ways families work together O Holidays and Celebrations O Understand sequencing (months and seasons) O Describe ways people celebrate holidays O 2 nd Half of the Year O Shelter O Varieties of shelter, clothing, needs, etc. O Tools O Past vs. Present tools O Identify different types of tools and their uses. O Wishes O Needs vs. Wants O Personal Goals O Places Near and Far O Neighbors and or neighborhoods O Hawaii Unit

27 Other Information O PBIS PBIS O Themes (Apples, Chicks and or Farm, Gingerbread, 100 th Day, Hawaii and or Oceans) O Field Trips O MAP testing MAP testing O Homework O Scholastic Books

28 PBIS (Positive Behavior Intervention Program) Purpose: O Create and maintain a safe learning environment where teachers can teach and students can learn. O Increase data-based decision making about behaviors and academic instruction and reinforcement across all school settings. Mackeben has 3 broad expectations: BE SAFE BE RESPECTFUL BE RESPONSIBLE Expectations are posted throughout the building. Teachers will be re- teaching the expectations throughout the year. Each classroom has a 3 step behavior management system.

29 Other Information O PBIS PBIS O Themes (Apples, Chicks and or Farm, Gingerbread, 100 th Day, Hawaii and or Oceans) O Field Trips O MAP testing MAP testing O Homework O Scholastic Books

30 MAP testing (Measures of Academic Progress) The MAP is a computer adaptive test that measures a student’s knowledge. Because it is adaptive, the test adjusts to the student’s skill level. As the student answers correctly, the questions become harder. If a student answers incorrectly, the questions become easier. The test will be administered to Kindergarteners in the fall, winter and spring. Because results come back to the district within a few days, the results will allow teachers to immediately target specific areas of instructional needs.

31 Other Information O PBIS PBIS O Themes (Apples, Chicks and or Farm, Gingerbread, 100 th Day, Hawaii and or Oceans) O Field Trips O MAP testing MAP testing O Homework O Scholastic Books

32 Questions?


Download ppt "Welcome to Kindergarten Curriculum Night Language Arts – 90 minutes Math – 60 minutes S.S., Sci., Health – 30 minutes Writing – 15 minutes Quiet time."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google