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Anxiety and Kids: “We have nothing to fear but fear itself” Touchstone Academy – Live and Learn Series, Oct. 23, 2014 Edward S. Yuzda, MD, MSc, FRCPC Dr.

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Presentation on theme: "Anxiety and Kids: “We have nothing to fear but fear itself” Touchstone Academy – Live and Learn Series, Oct. 23, 2014 Edward S. Yuzda, MD, MSc, FRCPC Dr."— Presentation transcript:

1 Anxiety and Kids: “We have nothing to fear but fear itself” Touchstone Academy – Live and Learn Series, Oct. 23, 2014 Edward S. Yuzda, MD, MSc, FRCPC Dr. Jean Craven, Clinical Psychologist Dr. JoAnne Burt,School Psychologist, ASD---S Ms. Anita Hofmann, Occupational Therapist

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3 Anxiety is the hand-maiden of creativity TS Elliot

4 Mental Disorder1 Year Prevalence (%) Age = years Any Anxiety Disorder16.4 Any Mood Disorder7.1 Major Depressive Disorder5.3 Bipolar Disorder1.1 Schizophrenia1.3 Any Disorder21 Anxiety - A Very Common Problem Society’s Most Common (yet Curable) Mental Health Problem

5  WHO study  Annual prevalence – 17.7 %  Lifetime prevalence Women – 30.5% Men – 19.2%

6 Overall Prevalance - 10% Separation Anxiety Disorder – % Selective Mutism – 0.7% Obsessive Compulsive Disorder – 1.2% Social Anxiety Disorder – 7% Specific Phobia – 10% Panic Disorder – 2-3% Agoraphobia – 3-4% Post Traumatic Stress Disorder – 2-3% About 40% of adults with Panic Disorder indicated that their symptoms began in their childhood

7 “The child is the father of the Man” William Wordsworth ( )

8  Childhood experiences heavily influence us  Attitudes, rules beliefs and assumptions, maladaptive or not, govern our behavior as adults

9  Anxiety is essential to life  A desire to reduce anxiety keeps us fed, keeps us procreating, keeps us sitting through a dead boring lecture  It compels us to carry out certain acts that forestall or prevent danger

10  Too much of a good thing  Uncontrollable  Chronic & Persistent  Exaggerated  Impairs functioning (at home, in relationships)  i.e. obsessionality

11 Time Anxiety

12 What is signaling? Initiation of Physiologic Cascade  Heart Rate  Tension  Alertness  Perception Sensory Perception (Ears, Eyes, Nose, Touch, Taste) Internal Signals (Thoughts, Emotions, Physical) DANGER! Brain Registers DANGER! Prepared to Fight or Flee for Safety & Protection

13 Signaling = “fight or flight”

14 What is anxiety? Initiation of Physiologic Cascade  Heart Rate  Tension  Alertness  Perception Sensory Perception (Ears, Eyes, Nose, Touch, Taste) Internal Signals (Thoughts, Emotions, Physical) No Danger Anxiety Brain Registers DANGER!

15 Everyone experiences anxiety from time to time. Normal anxiety is an expected response to stressful or dangerous situation. But anxiety which is abnormal occurs in the absence of danger and is excessive or inappropriate to the situation.

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17  Panic Disorder  Agoraphobia  Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder  Separation Anxiety Disorder  Generalized Anxiety Disorder (adult)  Social Anxiety Disorder  Specific Phobias  Selective Mutism

18  Obsessive Compulsive Disorder  Body Dysmorphic Disorder  Hoarding Disorder  Trichotillomania  Excoriation Disorder

19  Reactive Attachment Disorder  Disinhibited Social Engagement Disorder  Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder  Acute Stress Disorder  Adjustment Disorder

20 Ooooh… the days of ones care-free youth

21  Avoidance is the KEY functional symptom found in all Anxiety Disorders  Avoidance behaviours INCREASE anxiety  Not allowing Avoidance behaviours DECREASES anxiety  All successful therapeutic interventions in Anxiety Disorders MUST address Avoidance behaviours AVOIDANCE – The Yang to Anxiety’s Ying Avoidance Anxiety

22 Time Anxiety

23 Most people with psychological problems go to their family doctor with a physical complaint rather than recognizing that they have a form of mental distress. Physical symptoms Psychiatric symptoms

24 Sorrow that has no vent in tears may make other organs weep Henry Maudsley ( )

25  Whether mild, moderate or severe, parents/family must play a role in helping your child  there are general strategies that can help any child who is experiencing anxiety problems

26 Listen - listen to your child's thoughts and feelings Normalize - let your child know he/she is not alone Educate - anxiety is normal, harmless, and temporary Model it - Model facing fears and encouragement Praise - Don't forget to praise your child for his or her efforts

27  Reduce Stress  Make a Routine  Work Together  Give Consequences  Be Supportive  Encourage Independence  Avoid Giving Excessive Reassurance  Build Self-Confidence  Realistic Expectations  Dealing with Your Reactions  Take Risks  Avoid Avoidance

28 Anxious children and teens prefer to have a sense of control in their lives They feel calmer when:  life is predictable  they know what is expected of them  they know what the consequences will be Therefore set limits, create routines, encourage physical activity and good nutrition

29  Skill-based psychotherapy, teaching specific techniques  Targets maladaptive thoughts and behaviors  Psychoeducation about anxiety/anxiety is normal and adaptive  Learning to relax via Progressive Muscle Relaxation, Mindfulness or Calm Breathing  Challenging anxiety inducing thoughts  Exposure Therapy - facing fears

30  AnxietyBC.com  Teenmentalhealth.org

31 Rx?

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