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Special Education in Kentucky What Parents Need to Know About Special Education in Kentucky LOGAN COUNTY SCHOOLS Barry W. Goley, Director

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Presentation on theme: "Special Education in Kentucky What Parents Need to Know About Special Education in Kentucky LOGAN COUNTY SCHOOLS Barry W. Goley, Director"— Presentation transcript:

1 Special Education in Kentucky What Parents Need to Know About Special Education in Kentucky LOGAN COUNTY SCHOOLS Barry W. Goley, Director

2 LOGAN COUNTY SCHOOLS Serves approximately 575 students with disabilities, in all grades (preschool through 12 th & 14 th ). Employ 34 special education teachers, 7 speech-language pathologist, 3 occupational therapist, 1 physical therapist, 3 school psychologist, and 1 social worker

3 Definition of Special Education Special education means “specially designed instruction and related services, at no cost to parents, to meet the unique needs of the eligible child with a disability. It may include instruction in the classroom, in the home, in hospitals and institutions, and in other settings.”

4 Regulations Federal Regulations - 34 CFR Parts 300 and 303 Kentucky Administrative Regulations KAR 1:280 through 707 KAR 1:380 Local School District Procedures Kentucky Department of Education Division of Learning Services 500 Mero Street Frankfort, Kentucky Local Board of Education Director of Special Education

5 History of Federal Law Public Law Education for all Handicapped Children Act (1975) Amendments 1983, ’86, ‘90 IDEA (Individuals with Disabilities Education Act) IDEA ’97 (Public Law ) IDEA ’04 ( )

6 Definition of Advocate An advocate in terms of special education is someone who speaks or acts on behalf of a child with special needs.

7 Who are Advocates for your child? oParent oPrincipal oRegular Education Teacher oSpecial Education Teacher oRelated Service Providers oSpecial Education Director oDoctor oTherapist oFirst Steps Personnel oRelatives oFamily Friends oOthers

8 How Do I Advocate for My Child? Know your child’s abilities. Understand your child’s disability Identify your child’s needs List your concerns.

9 How Do I Advocate for My Child? Be aware of relevant laws and where to get information. Understand procedural safeguards the law provides to protect the rights of your child. Know your local district’s special education procedures.

10 How Do I Advocate for My Child? Get to know school personnel, district staff Be aware of educational and non-academic services that are available under the law.

11 How Do I Advocate for My Child? Maintain a home file/notebook. Attend all meetings. Write your questions down before the meeting. Know where to look for support. Communicate with the school; don’t wait until there’s a problem.

12 Where Do I Look for Support? School your child attends Local Special Education Department/Director Special Education Cooperative (GRREC) Parent support groups Books and internet Specific Disabilities' Organizations

13 Before the Meeting 1. What is your child good at? List strengths - positive points. 2. What does you child need help with? List weaknesses. 3. What are your goals for your child for the next 12 months? 4. What are your dreams and future goals for your child? (What do you expect your child to be doing at age 18? 25? 40?): 5. What part of your child's individual education program do you think has best helped your child? 6. Other important information you would like to share about your child. 7. What additional concerns or questions to you want to present to the team?

14 Before the Meeting: Know: Who is invited to the meeting (Notice of ARC Meeting) Why they’re invited. The purpose of the meeting.

15 Before the Meeting (Cont.) Gather copies of school work, notes from teachers, personal observations, and progress reports. Review records and notes of past conferences. Be familiar with your child’s IEP (Individual Education Program).

16 Before the Meeting (Cont.) Think about any problems your child is having in school. Example: Are any goals or objectives not being met? Think about possible solutions to share with the team. Make a list of significant changes, such as medication changes, major family events, etc.

17 Before the Meeting (Cont.) You may invite someone who has knowledge about your child to attend the meeting with you. Remember to bring your written ideas, questions and observations. Any documentation from outside agencies (e.g., physician statements, therapist, etc.)

18 During the Meeting Think of yourself as part of the team. Remember you are an expert regarding your child. Share your ideas/goals with the rest of the team. What would you like to see your child doing through the course of the upcoming year? Your expectations?

19 During the Meeting (Cont.) Ask questions! Ask for clarification of any terms, acronyms or procedures that you do not understand. Be specific regarding your concerns and priorities. Take notes regarding who will do what and when.

20 During the Meeting (Cont.) Stay with the purpose of the meeting until it is achieved. Ask for another meeting if you did not have enough time to discuss all of the important issues. Before leaving the meeting, know exactly what your next step(s) will be and get a copy of all paperwork.

21 After the Meeting Check your notes regarding who will do what and when. Share information with the rest of the family. Stay in touch with your child’s teachers/service providers. Acknowledge people’s efforts.

22 Special Education Cycle

23 EvaluationEligibility Individualized Education Program PlacementInstructionAnnual Review Referral

24 Evaluations The evaluation data is a critical component that drivers: - Disability Determination

25 Disability Categories Kentucky recognizes 14 disability categories Eligibility criteria varies among the categories, and the criteria is governed by the regulations. Some categories are very specific; other categories are more flexible based upon the data presented.

26 Evaluations The evaluation data is a critical component that drivers: - Individual Education Program (IEP)

27 Individual Education Program (IEP) An IEP is a written plan of action for a student with a disability who is eligible to receive special education and related services. The IEP describes the student’s needs (& strengths), annual goals, specially designed instruction and supplementary aids and services to address the needs of a student

28 Individual Education Program (IEP) The purpose of an IEP is: - Provide access to the general curriculum - Ensure the student is making progress in the general curriculum - Address the student’s unique educational needs - Prepare your student for further education, employment and independent living

29 Evaluations The evaluation data is a critical component that drivers: - Specially Designed Instruction

30 What will we provide? The evaluation will also determine Specially Designed Instruction – “what the teacher does” Supplementary Aids and Services – “what the student needs”

31 Evaluations The evaluation data is a critical component that drivers: - Accommodations and Modifications

32 Accommodations & Modifications Accommodations are tools or procedures that provide equal access to instruction and assessment for students with disabilities. It is provided to “level the playing field” without changing or lowering expectations

33 Accommodations & Modifications Modifications are changes made to the curriculum that alters or lowers the expectation of the course, standard or test. Modifications change “the field you are playing on”.

34 Questions and Answers


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