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Building on our Strengths: A Child Care Plan for Victoria September 2008 Victoria Regional Child Care Council PLAY (Partners in Learning and Advocacy for.

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Presentation on theme: "Building on our Strengths: A Child Care Plan for Victoria September 2008 Victoria Regional Child Care Council PLAY (Partners in Learning and Advocacy for."— Presentation transcript:

1 Building on our Strengths: A Child Care Plan for Victoria September 2008 Victoria Regional Child Care Council PLAY (Partners in Learning and Advocacy for Young Children) Lynell Anderson, CGA Senior Researcher, Human Early Learning Partnership Dan Rosen, M.Sc.Pl Consultant

2 Victoria RCCC learning … Families need more child care spaces, especially infant/toddler, part-time AND Families need quality, affordable spaces AND Stable public operating funds are required to add spaces, lower fees and raise wages for trained staff – i.e. to BUILD A SYSTEM …THEREFORE WE NEED: A provincial plan with timelines and adequate funding Community partnerships to implement the plan. Building on our Strengths: A Child Care Plan for Victoria

3 Project asks: How could plan be implemented in Victoria Region? Review of Project Deliverables Develop child care vision and plan Cost the plan Develop proposed implementation approach Increase understanding of economic benefits of improving access to quality, affordable child care, and implications for child care public policy Building on our Strengths: A Child Care Plan for Victoria

4 RCCC child care vision … The Greater Victoria Regional Child Care Council believes that all children in our area are entitled to an enriched, responsive and secure early childhood experience. Their families deserve recognition and support for their provision for their children’s well-being. Building on our Strengths: A Child Care Plan for Victoria

5 RCCC child care vision … At the moment the picture of care and education for our youngest citizens is fragmented, lacking cohesiveness and structure. Perhaps now we have a wonderful opportunity to introduce some fundamental changes. Building on our Strengths: A Child Care Plan for Victoria

6 RCCC child care vision … As a key component of child development & family support policy, a comprehensive child care system can and must support: Children’s healthy, holistic development Parents in all of their roles (parenting, working, studying, volunteering, caring for others) An effective child care system collaborates and/or integrates with other public services such as health and education. Building on our Strengths: A Child Care Plan for Victoria

7 Two-part Approach: 1.Comprehensive provincial plan - public funding from senior governments (federal/provincial) accountable for improved quality, affordability and access  based on ‘best practice’ policy recommendations, research and evidence 2.Build from strengths - while fragile, existing community assets (programs and people) and partnerships provide starting place Building on our Strengths: A Child Care Plan for Victoria

8 Social & Economic Benefits of Child Care Societal benefits derive from benefits for: 1.Children – human development, education, inclusion and rights*; productive future workforce; population health 2.Parents – social infrastructure support; labour force attachment support for employers (consider high female labour force participation); women’s equality*; poverty reduction 3.Regions – healthy communities; economic development *As outlined, for example, in Canada’s UN commitments Building on our Strengths: A Child Care Plan for Victoria

9 What does the Research Say? Benefits for Children & Society: Quality is key - overarching principles – begin early; well-educated, well-trained & well- compensated teachers – with resulting low staff turnover; small class sizes & high teacher-child ratios*  comprehensive approach; substantial cost *Economic Benefits of High-quality Early Childhood Programs: What Makes the Difference? CED, February 2006 Building on our Strengths: A Child Care Plan for Victoria

10 What does the Research Say? Literature Review commissioned by NZ Ministry of Education - synthesis of research analyzing impact of early childhood education (ECE) for children and families* Includes 117 studies, mainly post-1995, that met established research methodology criteria *Outcomes of Early Childhood Education: Literature Review, Mitchell, Wylie, & Carr, New Zealand Council for Educational Research, May, 2008 Building on our Strengths: A Child Care Plan for Victoria

11 NZ Literature Review (cont’d) Key Conclusions: 1.Positive outcomes (cognitive, learning dispositions, and social-emotional) in short and long term 2.Good quality is key to achieving gains on all outcomes 3.Outcomes occur for all children across socioeconomic range … additional gains in vulnerable groups 4.Children attending with middle class/better maternally educated mix had greater cognitive outcomes, both short and long term. Building on our Strengths: A Child Care Plan for Victoria

12 NZ Literature Review (cont’d) Key Conclusions (cont’d): 5.Parenting outcomes “empowering”– parenting, networks, confidence, paid employment. 6.Gains for both children and parents contribute to family and societal functioning. 7.Economic evaluations show benefits of public spending on universal, high quality approaches exceed costs: increased maternal employment, higher lifetime earnings, reduced use of special education and social services, less criminal activity. Downside? Possible short-term negative effects (behaviour, stress) consistently linked to low-quality conditions. Building on our Strengths: A Child Care Plan for Victoria

13 Social & Economic Benefits  Specific Public Policy and Funding Implications Conclusive evidence that: 1.If quality child care services, all children benefit – vulnerable children additional benefits 2.Benefits – for both targeted and universal approaches - outweigh costs 3.Vulnerability across socioeconomic spectrum  Positive return on public investment  minimum $2 returned for every $1 invested  if quality, universal child care services Building on our Strengths: A Child Care Plan for Victoria

14 Rate of access to ELCC programs for 3-6 year olds Data source: OECD. (2006). Starting Strong II: Early Childhood Education and Care. Country Profiles. AU, CZ, FI, HU, NL, UK – Estimated (averaged across ages 3-6) DE – Estimated (averaged across ABL and NBL) CA – Children 0-6 in child care including regulated family day care Building on our Strengths: A Child Care Plan for Victoria

15 Spending on ELCC programs Data source: OECD. (2006). Starting Strong II: Early Childhood Education and Care. Annex C, pg Building on our Strengths: A Child Care Plan for Victoria

16 It Can Be Done … Consider Our Public Investment in Education of $8,078/pupil OECD ranking*: 41 countries (including U.S.) & 10 provinces Overall, BC 3 rd (Reading), 5 th (Math), 6 th (Science & Problem-Solving) *BC Ministry of Education 2007/08 Service Plan Building on our Strengths: A Child Care Plan for Victoria

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18 Comprehensive, integrated plan required As OECD and community recommend … move from user fees to direct public funding of child care services, with accountability for public goals: Quality – improved compensation for trained staff Affordability – reduced parent fees, with subsidies Accessibility - expand spaces, with inclusion Building on our Strengths: A Child Care Plan for Victoria

19 Focused Public Investment Strategy: Establishing Targets & Benchmarks Universality (thru affordability, expansion, inclusion): Full time, part time or drop in, centre or family-based spaces for all children <6 & 60% of <12 10% of new spaces funded at 2x standard cost, for social, cultural and physical inclusion Parent fees average 20% of total costs (except drop- in programs free) Quality: Compensation = $25/hour average, including benefits Minimal rent (public or community-owned spaces) Building on our Strengths: A Child Care Plan for Victoria

20 RCCC Plan: Requires additional annual public investment of: $158 million, 1-12 year olds $119 million, 1-5 year olds $49 million, 3-5 year olds With 40% immediate return (Quebec experience), net annual public investment $95 million (1-12) Building on our Strengths: A Child Care Plan for Victoria

21 RCCC Plan: 3-5 annual public cost/child care space averages $8,960 Compare to: BC education cost - $8,078/pupil (Min of Ed, Information Bulletin, Aug ) Canadian university cost - $15,000/student (OECD Canada Country Note, 2004, paragraph 108) Building on our Strengths: A Child Care Plan for Victoria

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23 The Plan Closes the Gaps Of $158 million annual public investment (1-12): $24 million closes the quality gap - improving compensation in 10,365 existing spaces from $18/hour to $25/hour average (including benefits) $25 million closes the affordability gap - decreasing average parent fees for 10,635 existing spaces from 70% to 20% of total costs $109 million closes the expansion gap - creating 13,811 new affordable, quality spaces Building on our Strengths: A Child Care Plan for Victoria

24 Closing the Gaps (Targets) Current Phase 1 Phase 2 Phase 3 Phase 4 New Public Funds ($ millions) Existing spaces: Compensation $/hour (incl benefits) $18$23$25 Parent fees % of total cost 70%45%22%20% New spaces01,1004,1009,00013,811 % of children <12 accessing regulated child care space* 28%31%38%51%65% *> 80% of 1-4’s (others drop-in), 60% of 6-12’s Building on our Strengths: A Child Care Plan for Victoria

25 All ‘Public Investment Plan’ elements in place Proven product – if quality Demonstrated demand – if affordable, accessible Real returns – for children, families, economy, society Containable costs?  establish compensation, fee & access targets, yet overall declining birth rate, low technology, choice of family support/early learning programs available, quantifiable time periods Building on our Strengths: A Child Care Plan for Victoria

26 Child Care System Implementation Model Developed by: Lynell Anderson, B. Comm, CGA Through YWCA Canada and Child Care Advocacy Association of Canada (with funding from Government of Canada’s Social Development Partnerships Program) Based on Twenty years of work with ECE’s and families From Patchwork to Framework: A Child Care Strategy for Canada with additional thanks to Dan Rosen, Consultant and Ellen Larcombe, Human Early Learning Partnership (HELP) Building on our Strengths: A Child Care Plan for Victoria


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