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Family- Centered Innovations Improve Child Support Outcomes Connecticut Department of Social Services Child Support Policy Conference, June 27, 2014 Office.

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Presentation on theme: "Family- Centered Innovations Improve Child Support Outcomes Connecticut Department of Social Services Child Support Policy Conference, June 27, 2014 Office."— Presentation transcript:

1 Family- Centered Innovations Improve Child Support Outcomes Connecticut Department of Social Services Child Support Policy Conference, June 27, 2014 Office of Child Support Enforcement Administration for Children & Families U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Vicki Turetsky Commissioner

2 The child support program improves children’s chances in life  Serves 1 in 4 children in United States  One of largest sources of income support  Reduces child poverty  Promotes parental responsibility, work and involvement  A dollar of child support improves children’s educational outcomes more than any other income source 2

3 Income of poor custodial families Source: Urban Institute All Poor Custodial FamiliesPoor Custodial Families Who Receive Child Support 3

4 Overview of Labor Market Trends Employment and Earnings for Men and Women Have Been Converging –Men’s employment rates and median earnings have been falling, while women’s employment rates and median earnings have been rising –In the 1960s, most adult women did not work and the median earnings of those who did work were a fraction of the median earnings of men. –Today, women are nearly as likely to work as men and their median earnings are 71% of men’s median earnings. 4

5 Employment Rates, by Gender (16 and over) Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Current Population Survey 78% 5

6 Median Earnings, by Gender Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Current Population Survey Men 6

7 Changes in Families More and more children are being born outside of marriage and being raised by a single mother. –In 2012, 41% of all children were born to unmarried women, up from 9% in –The percent of children living with their mother and not their father has more than doubled since Today, nearly a quarter of all children live with their mother only. 7

8 Birth Rate for Women and Percent of Births to Unmarried Women Source: National Vital Statistics 9% 41% Birth Rate 8

9 Children usually receive reliable support when:  The noncustodial parent has a stable job  An income withholding order is in place…74% of collections are withheld from paychecks  The parent can comply with the support order  The money is paid to the family, instead of kept by the state to repay TANF benefits  The parent maintains ties with the child 9

10 The paradigm shift in child support  Short and medium-term strategies to increase reliable support to children  Using data to select the right tools for the right person at the right time  Early intervention to get parent on right track and prevent debt build-up  Change behavior to encourage payment… build ability and willingness to pay 10

11 Five evidence-based tools to increase regular payments  Right-sized orders (Takayesu 2011; Formoso, 2003; HHS/OIG, 2000)  Debt reduction (Heinrich, 2009; Cancian, 2009: HHS/OIG 2007)  Family distribution (Wheaton, 2008; Meyer, 2003; Bloom, 1998)  Parenting time (Pearson, 2006; HHS/OIG 2002)  Employment services (Sorensen, 2011; Schroeder, 2009; Miller, 2001) 11

12 Early intervention can increase regular support payments  Many child support agencies have early intervention strategies to work with parents early in the process-- before they fall behind.  Early intervention can address inaccurate orders and high debt.  Agencies partner with other programs to offer services.  Many courts use problem-solving models.  States must have “pay or work” procedures to be able to order a noncustodial parent who owes overdue support for a child receiving TANF assistance to enter into a payment plan or participate in work activities. 42 U.S.C. 666(a)(15) 12

13 Family-Centered Child Support Services CSE Core Mission: Locate Parents Establish Paternity Establish Orders Collect Support ChildSupportPrevention Engagement of Fathers from Birth EconomicStability Family Violence Collaboration Healthy Family Relationships Health Care Coverage 13

14 Work Programs for Non-Custodial Parents with Active Child Support Agency Involvement As of February 2014, at least 30 states and the District of Columbia have work- oriented programs withactive child support agency involvement that serve noncustodial parents. Most of these programs are not statewide, but three are (Georgia, Maryland, and North Dakota). Three states served more than 3,000 noncustodial parents in 2013 (Georgia, New York, and Texas); another six served more than 1,000 noncustodial parents in 2013 (Maryland, Michigan, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, and Wisconsin). 14

15 Two new studies: Child support employment programs boost collections  Texas and New York child support programs have conducted rigorous evaluations of their noncustodial parent employment programs:  Targeted unemployed noncustodial parents who were behind in their child support  Relied on court referrals for recruitment  Used a case management model  Employment services included job placement and retention services  Incorporated fatherhood/peer support curriculum  Both studies found significant positive effects on child support payments and employment that last over time 15

16 New York “Strengthening Families Through Stronger Fathers Initiative”  Participants experienced a 19% increase in the likelihood of employment  They earned an average of $986 more than nonparticipants, a 22% increase in earnings  Participants paid an average of $504 more than nonparticipants, a 38% increase in support payments  The difference between participants and the comparison group grew over time 16

17 Impact of New York’s Fatherhood Pilot Programs During first year after enrollment, participants earned an average of $986 more than nonparticipants, a 22% increase in earnings. During first year after enrollment, participants paid an average of $504 more than nonparticipants, a 38% increase in child support payments. 17

18 Texas “NCP Choices”  Participants were employed at 21% higher rates  Participants paid their child support 47% more often, for a 51 percent increase in total collections  Participants paid support 50% more consistently  Custodial parents associated with the participants were 21% less likely to receive TANF benefits, and 29% less likely 2 to 4 years later  The effects lasted at least 2 to 4 years after the program. Participants continued to pay their child support more often, in greater amounts, and more consistently over time 18

19 Impact of Texas’s NCP Choices Program Difference Average Cost Per Participant 19

20 A few OCSE initiatives Child Support Noncustodial Parent Employment Demonstration (CSPED) –An 1115 grant designed to examine the efficacy of child support-led employment programs for unemployed noncustodial parents. Parenting Time Opportunities for Children (PTOC) Pilot Program –A special improvement project grant to develop, implement, and evaluate service delivery models to establish parenting time orders along with child support orders. NEW – 1115 funding opportunity Behavioral Interventions in Child Support Services (BICS) grants –The goal of the BICS grants is to explore the potential relevance and application of behavioral economics principles to child support services. State IV-D agencies may apply through August 5,

21 More OCSE initiatives Review and Modification Toolkit –Changing a Child Support Order Guide with information to help parents understand the child support review and modification process (DCL-14-13) Family-Centered Fact Sheets and Interactive maps –Present examples of new ways states are helping parents support their children. They highlight family-centered strategies, data-based policies and practices, and customer-focused services that child support programs are embracing across the country. Locate Services, Referrals, and Electronic Interface –Expanded federal data access, including pilot access by state child welfare workers (OCSE-IM-12-02) Notice of Proposed Rulemaking – In Clearance 21

22 Visit Us At… 22

23 Questions 23

24 THE CONNECTICUT IV-D PROGRAM Where has it been – Where is it going? Connecticut Department of Social Services Child Support Policy Conference, June 27, 2014

25 CT IV-D Program Structure and Partnerships Connecticut Department of Social Services Child Support Policy Conference, June 27,

26 Program Strengths Deeply committed and seasoned staff Strong collaborative partnerships with cooperating agencies Thriving community-based fatherhood initiative network with experienced state-based leadership Reliable and responsive contractors Solid legislative and regulatory program framework Proud history of collections improvements  Wide array of arrearage management techniques  Access and connection to numerous federal databases for parental identification and location Commitment to a family centered approach to child support establishment and enforcement Connecticut Department of Social Services Child Support Policy Conference, June 27,

27 27 Connecticut Department of Social Services Child Support Policy Conference, June 27, 2014 Program Challenges Stagnating or declining collections due to economic downturn and limited capacity of existing collection mechanisms Automated system that has expended its useful life and is rapidly falling into obsolescence Limited fiscal resources for development of modern, robust services to assist parents Urgent need for succession planning to deal with accelerated loss of experienced staff to outside opportunities and retirement

28 Recent Accomplishments  Management restructure within DSS/BCSE with renewed focus on federal program performance measures  Strategic planning initiative  System enhancements to simplify case processing and reduce programming costs  Implementation of on-line real-time access to various federal and state sources of case information, and e-IWO  Partnership with State of RI to share SDU costs  Placement of Fatherhood Initiative within the child support management structure  Feasibility study of web-based customer service portal requirements, and other system modernization initiatives  Advocacy for increased funding to support major system modernization initiatives Connecticut Department of Social Services Child Support Policy Conference, June 27,

29 Vision For The Future  Develop and implement state-of-the-art automated system  Develop and enable a robust child support program management structure  Increase child support collections  Fully integrate Fatherhood Initiative into child support program with adequate resources  Establish right-sized orders for low-income obligors as a strategy to increase payment frequency and foster the importance of having both parents involved in raising children  Improve child support program efficiency & customer service Connecticut Department of Social Services Child Support Policy Conference, June 27,

30 Prepared by DSS Office of Organizational & Skill Development in partnership with UConn SSW Child Support Policy Conference, June 27, THANK YOU!

31 Prepared by DSS Office of Organizational & Skill Development in partnership with UConn SSW Child Support Policy Conference, June 27, A Model for Collaboration, Partnership and Systems Change

32 Prepared by DSS Office of Organizational & Skill Development in partnership with UConn SSW Child Support Policy Conference, June 27, “An Act Establishing a Fatherhood Initiative, a Fatherhood Council and a Research & Demonstration Program and Concerning other Methods to Strengthen Child Support Enforcement” GOAL: To promote the positive involvement and interactions of Fathers with their children PUBLIC ACT

33 33  Promote public education concerning emotional & financial responsibilities of fatherhood  Assist men in preparation for legal, financial & emotional responsibilities of fatherhood  Promote the establishment of paternity at childbirth Public Act :Objectives Prepared by DSS Office of Organizational & Skill Development in partnership with UConn SSW Child Support Policy Conference, June 27, 2014

34 34  Encourage fathers regardless of marital status, to foster emotional connection to & financial support of their children  Integrate state and local services available for families  Establish support mechanisms for fathers in their relationship with their children, regardless of their marital or financial status Public Act :Objectives Prepared by DSS Office of Organizational & Skill Development in partnership with UConn SSW Child Support Policy Conference, June 27, 2014

35 Prepared by DSS Office of Organizational & Skill Development in partnership with UConn SSW Child Support Policy Conference, June 27, CT Fatherhood Advisory Council Dept. of Social Services (DSS) DSS Children’s Trust Fund Dept. of Children & Families State Dept. of Education Dept. of Correction Dept. of Labor Dept. of Public Health Dept. of Mental Health & Addition Svcs Judicial Support Enforcement Services Judicial Court Support Services Division Judicial Branch Community Court Chief Family Support Magistrate Commission On Children Career Resources, Inc. Community Renewal Team, Inc. Families in Crisis, Inc. Family Strides, Inc. GBAPP, Inc. Madonna Place, Inc. New Haven Family Alliance, Inc. New Opportunities, Inc. Real Dads Forever Village for Families & Children, Inc. CT Coalition Against Domestic Violence Greater Hartford Legal Aid

36 36 Local & Regional Partners DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL SERVICES CT’s TANF agency and lead agency for Child Support and the John S. Martinez Fatherhood Initiative of Connecticut FAC MEMBERSHIP State Agencies (DOC, DOL, DPH, DMHAS, SDE, DCF) Judicial Department Community-Based Organizations Faith-Based Organizations Experts in Child Development Domestic Violence Experts Men’s Health Experts 10 COMMUNITY-BASED AGENCIES OFFERING: State-Certified Fatherhood Program Comprehensive Intake & Assessment Case Management Services Curriculum-based Group Instruction Access to Domestic Violence Prevention Services Voluntary Paternity Establishment Services State-Owed Arrearage Adjustment Program Internal & External Referrals MADONNA PLACE, INC. Norwich NEW OPPORTUNITIES, INC. Waterbury NEW HAVEN FAMILY ALLIANCE New Haven FAMILIES IN CRISIS, INC. Hartford New Haven Waterbury FAMILY STRIDES, INC. Torrington 12 CAAs Comprehensive Intake & Assessment DSS Pre-Application Assistance Case Management Services Referral to Services Outside the CAA DSS &DOL OFFICES Assistance with Application/Eligibility Determination for DSS/DOL Services Referrals to Fatherhood Programming Local & Regional Partners CAREER RESOURCES, INC. Bridgeport Local & Regional Partners VILLAGE FOR FAMILIES & CHILDREN Hartford GBAPP, INC. Bridgeport COMMUNITY RENEWAL TEAM, INC. Hartford Local & Regional Partners CT DEPT. OF CORRECTION Offered in Select Facilities Prepared by DSS Office of Organizational & Skill Development in partnership with UConn SSW Child Support Policy Conference, June 27, 2014

37 Prepared by DSS Office of Organizational & Skill Development in partnership with UConn SSW Child Support Policy Conference, June 27, Program Profile  the (6) state funded fatherhood sites served approximately 5,082 dads  Average age is 33  Barriers: low education levels, criminal history, unemployed, housing, child support, transportation, mental health, substance abuse, food insecurities etc.  Average number of children is 2.5

38 38  agencies serving same families  unmarried parents  school attendance/educational gaps  juvenile justice involvement  families inadequately supported on welfare  men w/out adequate education/job skills  incarcerated fathers needing re-entry support  domestic violence/safe engagement Cross-systems disconnects provided opportunities for collaboration… Strengths-based Approach Prepared by DSS Office of Organizational & Skill Development in partnership with UConn SSW Child Support Policy Conference, June 27, 2014

39 39  CT Arrearage Adjustment Program ‘01  CT Fatherhood Program Certification ‘04  Interagency MOU ‘07 DSS DCF DOC SDE DOL DPH DMHAS Judicial SES Judicial CSSD  Promoting Responsible Fatherhood Grant ‘06 JSM Fatherhood Initiative of CT National Milestones Prepared by DSS Office of Organizational & Skill Development in partnership with UConn SSW Child Support Policy Conference, June 27, 2014

40 Prepared by DSS Office of Organizational & Skill Development in partnership with UConn SSW Child Support Policy Conference, June 27, Looking Ahead… Internal efforts for integration of fatherhood principles Fatherhood Initiative Strategic Plan

41 Prepared by DSS Office of Organizational & Skill Development in partnership with UConn SSW Child Support Policy Conference, June 27, THANK YOU!


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