Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

PSI Parent-Child Program A unique community program for young parents and their at-risk children.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "PSI Parent-Child Program A unique community program for young parents and their at-risk children."— Presentation transcript:

1

2 PSI Parent-Child Program A unique community program for young parents and their at-risk children

3 THE PROBLEM Children were developmentally delayed -- at least 12 months below chronological ageChildren were developmentally delayed -- at least 12 months below chronological age Young parents were frustrated by childrearing dutiesYoung parents were frustrated by childrearing duties Young parents were emotionally immature and subject to sexual exploitationYoung parents were emotionally immature and subject to sexual exploitation Infants had inconsistent pre-natal care.Infants had inconsistent pre-natal care. Children were developmentally delayed -- at least 12 months below chronological ageChildren were developmentally delayed -- at least 12 months below chronological age Young parents were frustrated by childrearing dutiesYoung parents were frustrated by childrearing duties Young parents were emotionally immature and subject to sexual exploitationYoung parents were emotionally immature and subject to sexual exploitation Infants had inconsistent pre-natal care.Infants had inconsistent pre-natal care. Young single parents 18 to 24 years old and their infants and pre-school children were admitted to PSI out-patient programs. Staff observed that the parents’ home environment, nutritional habits, child rearing approaches, and life styles presented these risks:

4 THE SOLUTION Create a program that integrates a practicum on parenting with adaptive living and pre-vocational skills training for young adults AND intensive early intervention for infants and children. The result is the PSI PARENT-CHILD PROGRAM.

5 PSI PARENT-CHILD PROGRAM Admissions Criteria 18 – 25 years old custodial parents of a child 0 – 5 years old DSM IV Axis I (Psychiatric Diagnosis) and/or DSM IV Axis II (MR/DD Diagnosis) Functional impairment in social and adaptive skills History of high risk or anti-social behaviors Transition from Special Education Program For Young Adults

6 Admissions Criteria DSM IV Axis II Developmental disorder (including pervasive developmental disorder, or specific developmental disability) DSM IV Axis III Medical disorder (including physical disabilities, HIV, Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, Prenatal exposure to drugs) DSM IV Axis IV Environmental Stressors (including inadequate childrearing, neglect, and limited environmental experiences and stimulation For Infant or Young Child PSI PARENT-CHILD PROGRAM

7 PSI PARENT-CHILD PROGRAM Intake Process Referrals from community agencies, special education high schools, and families to PSI Intake Office Intake interviews with the young parent, family, and referring agency Formal Assessments of Young Adult AND Formal Assessments of Infant and Child Comprehensive Plan

8 PSI PARENT-CHILD PROGRAM Goals for the Parent Assist acquisition of adaptive living skills to support enhanced independent living Develop parenting skills and attitudes to support normal development of children Support positive transition to adulthood and personal goals attainment

9 PSI PARENT-CHILD PROGRAM Program Goals for the Child Stimulate child’s development in all spheres Improve health and nutritional status Improve parent-child bonding and basic trust

10 Parent and Child enrolled simultaneously Program Hours for both are 8:00 am – 3:00 pm, Monday – Friday Parent and child are together for minimum of two hours daily with PSI Certified Parent Trainers. PSI parenting curricula are Hawaii Early Learning Program (HELP) and Child Welfare League of America Parent Power Pages Training techniques stress nonjudgmental coaching and feedback, Demonstration and modeling desired parenting behaviors PSI PARENT-CHILD PROGRAM Childrearing Component

11 Young Adult Component Prevocational Training Job Training Interest Areas – Culinary Arts, Clerical/Computer Operations, Laundry, Home Health, Paper Recycling, and Fine Arts/Crafts Job Search Job Performance, Attitude and Job Safety Employee Relations Special Placement Opportunities Internships Supported Employment PSI PARENT-CHILD PROGRAM

12 Young Adult Component (c ontinued) Academic Training GED Preparation Functional Literacy Money Management Personal and Home Living Skills Training Grooming and Self Care Medication Management Sexuality, Sexually Transmitted Diseases Home Care, Meal Planning and Nutrition PSI PARENT-CHILD PROGRAM

13 Current Enrollment 14 parents + 18 children Discharge Statistics 19 young adults discharged in last two years 15 graduated to internships or supported employment 4 dropped out 13 children discharged in the last two years 13 children graduated to public schools or Head Start PSI PARENT-CHILD PROGRAM Outcome Statistics

14 Program Outcomes for Young Adults Gains in Adaptive Living Skills 7 in Supported Employment 3 in Competitive Employment 5 Internship Placements 6 Improved Living situations (move to an apartment with child) Gains in Parenting Skills (measured by CWLA parenting instrument) 75 % talking appropriately to the child 60% practicing positive discipline 100% successful completion of parenting classes PSI PARENT-CHILD PROGRAM

15 “I like coming… I needed to change.”

16 “I’m learning to care for my child.” “I have a job. I never thought I’d get a job.”

17 “I am also learning how to take care of myself.”

18 Program Outcomes for Children Academic/Developmental Gain 100% had some improvement in developmental functioning as measured by HELP Of 14 children enrolled -- 5 function at expected developmental level 6showed significant developmental gains 3 showed modest developmental gains PSI PARENT-CHILD PROGRAM

19 Program Outcomes for Children (continued) General Health Improvement 80% reduction in colds and viral infections 100% immunization 100% with current physicals 100% with current dental evaluations PSI PARENT-CHILD PROGRAM

20 Program Outcomes for Children (continued) Reduction in Parenting Risk Factors 0% Referrals to child protective services 50% reduction in emergency hospital admissions 75% reduction in emergency hospital/doctor visits PSI PARENT-CHILD PROGRAM

21 LESSONS LEARNED 1. Day treatment programs that integrate parents and their children improve outcomes for both. 2. Children at risk show consistent gains from the PSI Parent-Child Program PSI PARENT-CHILD PROGRAM

22 LESSONS LEARNED (continued) 3.Involvement of young adult’s support system improve the likelihood of positive gains. 4. Special community outreach efforts are needed to encourage non-custodial parents to participate in similar programs. PSI PARENT-CHILD PROGRAM

23 THE PSI PARENT-CHILD PROGRAM Thank you for letting us share our program with you. For Intake and Admissions Contact Ms. Darlene Tucker Please visit our website


Download ppt "PSI Parent-Child Program A unique community program for young parents and their at-risk children."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google