Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

CHILD MALTREATMENT FOR MARYLAND ASSOCIATION OF RESOURCES FOR FAMILIES AND YOUTH Shirley Stitt, L.C.P.C. Stacey Brown, M.Ed, LCPC The Family Tree.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "CHILD MALTREATMENT FOR MARYLAND ASSOCIATION OF RESOURCES FOR FAMILIES AND YOUTH Shirley Stitt, L.C.P.C. Stacey Brown, M.Ed, LCPC The Family Tree."— Presentation transcript:

1 CHILD MALTREATMENT FOR MARYLAND ASSOCIATION OF RESOURCES FOR FAMILIES AND YOUTH Shirley Stitt, L.C.P.C. Stacey Brown, M.Ed, LCPC The Family Tree

2 Welcome MARFY

3 Define and Identify Characteristics of Child Abuse and Neglect Define and Identify Symptoms of Child Sexual Abuse Learn Why Professional Boundaries are Important How to Report Suspected Abuse and Maltreatment Overview of Presentation

4 Child Physical Abuse and Neglect

5 Maryland’s Child Abuse Statistics In 2012 Maryland had 55,775 Referrals of Child Abuse & Neglect 13,079 were victims of child abuse or neglect 26 Children in Maryland died as a result of abuse or neglect About 6,098 Children Spend Time Out of Their Homes Each Year Due to Maltreatment (2010)

6 Types and Occurrence of Reports on Child Maltreatment in Maryland  Neglect 73 %  Physical 23 %  Sexual 13 %

7 Maryland State Definitions of Child Abuse and Neglect –Family Law Abuse means:  The physical or mental injury of a child by any parent or other person who has permanent or temporary care, custody, or responsibility for supervision of a child, or by any household or family member, under circumstances that indicate that the child's health or welfare is harmed or at substantial risk of being harmed  Sexual abuse of a child, whether physical injuries are sustained or not

8 Neglect Neglect Means:  The leaving of a child unattended or other failure to give proper care and attention to a child by any parent or other person who has permanent or temporary care or custody or responsibility for supervision of the child under circumstances that indicate: That the child's health or welfare is harmed or placed at substantial risk of harm Mental injury to the child or a substantial risk of mental injury

9 Victims of Physical Abuse and Neglect Males and Females equally victimized Rate of victimization is inversely related to child’s age Recurrence of abuse 9% within 6 months of first incidence Children who were neglected are at highest risk Increased risk when maltreated by mother Children whose families received services including placement are at great risk of recurrence NCANDS (2007)

10 Perpetrators of Physical Abuse and Neglect  Female 55%, Male 40%  Parents account for 88% of perpetrators  Neglect is the most common type of maltreatment for all perpetrators  Breakdown of most likely perpetrator Neglect: both parents Physical abuse: unmarried partner (not child’s parent) Sexual abuse: other relative NCANDS (2012)

11 Characteristics of Physically Abusive Caregivers  Unfulfilled need for nurturance  Isolation or fear of relationships  Lack of support systems  Marital/Intimate Partner problems  Life crises  Inability to care for or protect a child  Lack of nurturing child-rearing practices

12 Characteristics of Maltreated Children  Weak Parent-Child bonding and attachment  Slow expressive language development, delays in receptive language, deficits in articulation  Problematic transactions with extra-familial systems  Inadequate coping skills  Parentified behaviors

13 Characteristics of Maltreated Children  Considers disorganization and chaos the norm  Emotional desensitization to violence  Defensive world view  Tendencies towards low self-esteem, depression, anti-social behavior and/or self injury  Little ability to draw from past experiences or anticipate future consequences

14 Indicators of Abuse Unusual or unexplained injuries, in various stages of healing May suffer from chronic illnesses, headaches, or stomachaches Signs of neglect such as dirty clothes, poor hygiene, or excessive hunger May be withdrawn from everyone around them May show signs of depression or have low self-esteem May use violence in order to solve conflicts that arise Have a hard time falling or staying asleep and may also fall asleep during school May experience flashbacks

15 Indicators of Abuse Problems in school including frequent absences, fights, and fatigue May act overly responsible She/he may become very worried over poor results in grades or sports May act out sexually or have a mature sexual vocabulary May come up with extravagant stories about bruises or scratches May become very upset when a worker needs to leave or when they have to leave school or child care May act out the violence in play or in story A difficulty in expressing emotions other than anger

16 Developmentally Expected Behaviors in Children Let’s Educate Ourselves

17 Developmental Milestones

18 Encouraging competence and confidence School Age 6 to 12

19 Physical/ Motor development Copies a triangle (6year), diamonds (7year), prints letters, draws recognizable man with head, body & limbs Ties shoes Skips with alternating feet Rides bicycle Gains sports skills and coordination increases Social/ Emotional Development Peers gain importance, and the child has increased interest in the world outside home Identifies with the peer group rather than with the family Learns to differentiate between personal goals and those of the group Intelligent Development Ability to reason and solve problems improves, and concerned about right and wrong Can entertain another point of view Attention span increases Vocabulary expands geometrically (50,000 words by age 12) School Age (6 to 12)

20 Staying connected when kids what to fly Teenage Years (13-17)

21 Physical/ Motor development Adolescent growth spurt Onset of sexual maturity (after 10 years-old) Development of primary and secondary sexual characteristics Social/ Emotional Development Identity is key issue Conformity most impossible Organized sports diminish for many Cross-gender relationships Cognitive / Language Development Systematic problem-solving strategies Can handle hypotheticals Deals with past, present, future Adopts personal speech patterns Communication becomes focus of relationships Teenage Years 13-17

22 Child Sexual Abuse

23 Definition of Child Sexual Abuse The Federal Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act (CAPTA) (42 U.S.C.A. § 5106g), as amended by the CAPTA Reauthorization Act of 2010, defines child sexual abuse as, at minimum:  Sexual abuse - “the employment, use, persuasion, inducement, enticement, or coercion of any child to engage in, or assist any other person to engage in, any sexually explicit conduct or simulation of such conduct for the purpose of producing a visual depiction of such conduct; or the rape, and in cases of caretaker or inter-familial relationships, statutory rape, molestation, prostitution, or other form of sexual exploitation of children, or incest with children.”

24 Deliberate contact with a child or teen’s genitals, buttocks or  Deliberate contact with a child or teen’s genitals, buttocks or chest/breasts;  Penetration of the child or teen’s mouth, anus, or vagina with an object or body part;  Making a child or teen touch another person’s anus, penis, or vagina; and,  Coercing a child or teen to touch him/herself, the offender or another child.  Penetration of the child or teen’s mouth, anus, or vagina with an object or body part;  Making a child or teen touch another person’s anus, penis, or vagina; and,  Coercing a child or teen to touch him/herself, the offender or another child. Touching Behaviors Can Include:

25 Non-Touching Behaviors Can Include:  Exposing oneself to a child or a teen;  Viewing and violating the private behaviors of a child or teen;  Taking sexually explicit or provocative photographs of a child or teen;  Showing pornography to a child or teen; and,  Communicating with a child or teen about sexually explicit fantasies or experiences (in person, by phone, via or Internet, etc.)

26 Indicators of Sexual Abuse  Withdrawn Behavior  Angry Outbursts  Anxiety  Depression  Not wanting to be left alone with a particular individual  Sexual knowledge, language and/or behaviors that are inappropriate for child’s age  Bedwetting and/or inability to control bladder functions

27 Child sexual abuse statistics 1 in 4 women and 1 in 6 men report having experienced child sexual abuse. The vast majority (87%) of sexual abuse is never reported Research shows that children rarely make up accusations of sexual abuse.

28 Why Children Won’t Tell if They are Being Sexually Abused  The abuser convinces the child that they won’t believed, and they are somehow responsible for the abuse and will be punished  The child may care about or feel protective of the abuser  Children remain silent in order to protect the non- abusive parent  A child may be confused by the abuse if they experience physical pleasure, arousal or emotional intimacy from the abuse  A child may feel they allowed the abuse to happen and should be able to stop it

29 Why Children Won’t Tell (con’t)  People who abuse children may give them gifts and treats and may threats about what will happen if the child says “no” or tells someone  In order to keep the abuse secret, the abuser will play on the child’s fear, embarrassment or guilt about what is happening

30 Secrets May Not Be Good For Children But Surprises Are  You are a special person and deserve to be treated with love and respect.

31 Common Deficits of People who Sexually Abuse Children Communication Difficulty discussing emotions and needs Empathy Insensitivity to needs of others Accountability Sense of entitlement

32 Characteristics of Male Offenders : Fewer than 5% have a psychotic mental illness Many who sexually abuse children do not meet the criteria for pedophilia The vast majority are heterosexual More than half report committing their first offense before the age of 18; avg. age % high school grads 50% under supervision for property or drug offense

33 Characteristics of Female Offenders  50% report prior abuse by spouse, boy friend.  1/3 report abuse by parent  89% report drug usage; PTSD prominent  Like men, tend to abuse children they know  Victims may have an even harder to find support

34 Who Sexually Abuses Children 93% of victims were abused by someone they knew. 34% of victims were abused by family members. 40% of victims were abused by peers or older children. * Bureau of Justice Statistics report: Sexual Assault of Young Children as Reported to Law Enforcement: Victim, Incident, and Offender Characteristics, July 2000.

35 Why do some children sexually offend? Exposure: Witnessing violence, cultural messages, unsafe community Experience: Things which happen to the child Deficits: Failure to develop skills, lack of supportive environment Deviance: Genetic or neurobiological differences URSBC

36 Developmentally Expected Sexual Behaviors in Children Let’s Educate Ourselves

37 The Enough Abuse Campaign Early childhood (ages 3 – 5): Touch genitals for pleasure (masturbate) Play games like doctor to explore physical differences between boys and girls Ask questions about where babies come from and how they are born Developmentally expected behaviors Preventing child sexual abuse

38 The Enough Abuse Campaign Developmentally expected behaviors Middle childhood (ages 6-8): Engage in sexual exploration with peers Begin looking to peers and media for information about sex and gender expectations Develop more complex understanding of sex and sexuality Masturbate Socialize mainly with own gender and maintain rigid expectations for behavior based on gender Developmentally expected behaviors Preventing child sexual abuse

39 The Enough Abuse Campaign Developmentally expected behaviors Late childhood (ages 9-12): Preoccupation with sexuality Develop crushes and may begin dating Have concerns about being ‘normal’ Masturbate Reluctant and/or embarrassed to ask questions of caregivers Value privacy Developmentally expected behaviors Preventing child sexual abuse

40 The Enough Abuse Campaign Developmentally expected behaviors Adolescence (ages 13-17): Express their sexuality Masturbate Have the capacity to distinguish between healthy and unhealthy relationships Understand that media messages influence views about sex Understand consequences of sexual activity (pregnancy, STDs, etc.) Adapted from “Growth and Development, Ages 13 to 17 – What Parents Need to Know” Developmentally expected behaviors Preventing child sexual abuse

41 The Enough Abuse Campaign Developmentally expected behaviors Adolescence (ages 13-17): Express their sexuality Masturbate Have the capacity to distinguish between healthy and unhealthy relationships Understand that media messages influence views about sex Understand consequences of sexual activity (pregnancy, STDs, etc.) Adapted from “Growth and Development, Ages 13 to 17 – What Parents Need to Know” Developmentally expected behaviors Preventing child sexual abuse

42 The Enough Abuse Campaign Scenario You walk into the other room to find your son and one of his friends with their pants down, touching each other’s genitals. Scenario Preventing child sexual abuse

43 The Enough Abuse Campaign Is there an obvious difference in power? Age Size Intelligence URSBC Assessing the situation Preventing child sexual abuse Assessing the situation

44 The Enough Abuse Campaign Is there a subtle difference in power? Strength Popularity Self-image URSBC Assessing the situation Preventing child sexual abuse

45 The Enough Abuse Campaign Is there a temporary difference in power? Baby-sitting ‘In charge’ Fantasy roles Assessing the situation Preventing child sexual abuse

46 Professional Boundaries

47 What Are Professional Boundaries?  Clearly established limits that allow for safe connections between yourself and children  A clear understanding of the limits and responsibilities of your role

48 The Importance of Boundaries  Role modeling to the children/youth healthy communication and professional relationship  Staying focused on one’s responsibilities to the youth in your care, the provision of helpful and appropriate services based on your position description

49 Consequences of Having Loose/Poor Boundaries  Compassion fatigue  Youth may not be given appropriate or helpful services, which could affect the youth’s willingness to accept other services available  Youth may feel betrayed, abandoned, and/or poorly served  Staff and/or youth may be emotionally traumatized and/or put in physical danger

50 Why Is It Difficult To Establish And Maintain Professional Boundaries?  Dual relationships  Values conflicts  Vicarious Trauma  Playing the “hero” role  Poor teamwork

51 Techniques for Creating and Maintaining Healthy Professional Boundaries  Begin by establishing an appropriate professional relationship  When boundary issues or warning signs appear address issue immediately  Use your supervisor and/or human resources as a sounding board when you have questions.

52 Techniques for Creating and Maintaining Healthy Professional Boundaries (con’t)  Use your professional judgment when interacting with the youth, youth’s family and others in social setting  Promote and role model positive, open communication and respectful sharing of information  Take care of yourself!

53 Reporting Suspected Child Maltreatment How to Make the Report

54 Maryland Reporting Requirements Reporting Suspected Child Abuse or Neglect CODE OF MARYLAND REGULATIONS, Section Requires reporting child abuse or neglect in the following manner:  An individual shall immediately report suspected child abuse or neglect to the local department of social services, or report the suspected incident to a local law enforcement agency.  Health practitioners, educators, human service workers, and police officers are required to report, both orally and in writing, any suspected child abuse or neglect, with oral report being made immediately and the written report being made within 48 hours of the contact which disclosed the suspected abuse or neglect.  Reports of abuse shall be made to the local departments of social services or the appropriate law enforcement agency. Reports of neglect shall be made to local departments of social services.  An employee of a local department of social services who receives a report of suspected child abuse or neglect, shall report the information to the protective services unit within the local department at once so as to initiate prompt handling of the report of suspected child abuse or neglect.

55 The Report Why Don’t Some People Report Child Abuse and Neglect? Reasons people don’t report include: Choosing instead to effectively intervene independent of the formal system Fear or unwillingness to get involved Fear that a report will make matters worse Reluctance to risk angering the family Concern that making a report will negatively impact an existing relationship with the child or others Belief that someone else will speak up and do something

56 The Report  A report shall include: The name and home address of the child and the parent or other individual responsible for the care of the child The present location of the child The age of the child The names and ages of other children in the home The nature and extent of injuries or sexual abuse or neglect of the child, including any information known to the individual making the report of previous possible physical or sexual abuse or neglect

57 The Report  If reporting abuse or neglect of a child involving mental injury, a description of the substantial impairment of the child's mental or psychological ability to function that was observed and identified, and why it is believed to be attributable to an act of maltreatment or omission of proper care and attention

58 Your Responsibility as a Reporter A mandated reporter shall make an oral report, by telephone or direct communication, as soon as possible: To the local department or appropriate law enforcement agency if the person has reason to believe that the child has been subjected to abuse or neglect The mandated reporter shall make a written report to the local department not later than 48 hours after the contact, examination, attention, or treatment that caused the individual to believe that the child had been subjected to abuse or neglect

59 Confidentiality of Report The name of the reporter may only be revealed under a court order. However, if the reporter is a professional, he or she may give written permission for his or her identity to be revealed. The identity of any other person whose life or safety is likely to be endangered by disclosing the information must not be disclosed. This is extremely important when sharing information with parents or the person who is suspected of child neglect or abuse. Information should only be disclosed when doing so would be in the best interest of the child who is the subject of the report. Professionals discretion should be exercised to disclose only that information which is relevant for the care or treatment of the child. In 1986, the Maryland confidentiality law was amended to permit the disclosure of information concerning abuse and neglect to licensed practitioners, or an institution which, is providing treatment or care to a child who is the subject of a report of child abuse or neglect. Maryland law also permits information to be shared with members of a multidisciplinary case consultation team who are investigating or providing services in response to a report of suspected abuse or neglect. Maryland Department of Human Resources

60 Alternative Response

61 Alternative Response is an approach that:  Involves families  Encourages workers and families to collaborate  Focuses on identifying concerns and finding solutions  Forms stronger connections with community based agencies

62 All referrals that meet the statutory definitions of maltreatment must be screened in: CPS Response Alternative Response Assessment Investigation Response All screened in referrals must receive a CPS response according to law

63 Investigative ResponseBothAlternative Response Focus on IncidentSafetyFocus on Family Determine FindingsPerformanceFocus on family functioning and healthy child development Identify PerpetratorChild and family well beingEmphasize partnership between parents, DSS, extended family and community supports Useful in moderate to high risk cases Recognized agency authorityNo findings made, families identified as in need of support Gathers forensic evidence for use in court proceedings Responds to family unique circumstances

64 State and Local Resources

65 Resources  Maryland Department of Human Resources  Child Abuse Prevention Network  Childhelp USA  Prevent Child Abuse America  The Family Tree  Child Welfare League of America  The Enough Abuse Campaign


Download ppt "CHILD MALTREATMENT FOR MARYLAND ASSOCIATION OF RESOURCES FOR FAMILIES AND YOUTH Shirley Stitt, L.C.P.C. Stacey Brown, M.Ed, LCPC The Family Tree."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google