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Welcome! Thank you for joining us today. Our presentation will begin shortly. While you wait, this sibling group waits in Ethiopia for a loving family.

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Presentation on theme: "Welcome! Thank you for joining us today. Our presentation will begin shortly. While you wait, this sibling group waits in Ethiopia for a loving family."— Presentation transcript:

1 Welcome! Thank you for joining us today. Our presentation will begin shortly. While you wait, this sibling group waits in Ethiopia for a loving family. Please contact the Waiting International Child Program for more information on their file or other waiting children. LTrinh@chsfs.org or 651-255-2252LTrinh@chsfs.org 909-08 These delightful children were born on 3/2004, 1/2003 and 6/1999. The oldest sister’s name means “Loveable Seed.” She has large soulful eyes and a tender heart. The six year old brother adjusts well to new environments. He is polite and observant. He often watches over his younger sister and will comfort her when she is upset. He is curious and often asks questions. The youngest sister is very close to her brother. She likes to talk and play with him. She knows the alphabet and can count. These precious kids have no known medical needs and are waiting for their own family to bring them home!

2 Spring 2008MN Organization on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome 2 A few reminders before we begin… On-line series facilitator: Melissa Mendez, MSW, LISW mmendez@chsfs.org A few reminders…  Today’s seminar is from 11-12:30pm central time. An e-mail address to confirm your attendance will be given out at the end of our discussion, but we will stay on the call for a few minutes afterwards if people have further questions, comments, etc.  Participation in today’s seminar is HIGHLY encouraged! This will help make it more fun, interactive, and informative. With our new webinar system, the best way to interact is through the “question” box. Please type in your comment/question and send it to us and we’ll be taking questions as we go along.  Other upcoming topics: -Current Treads in International Adoption. Country program updates and the Impact on Families. Thursday, May 21, 2009, 11-12:30p.m. (Central)  Beliefs: A Look at Our Clients and Ourselves. What Do We All Bring To Our Work With Families? And How Does this Impact the Experience? Thursday, June 18, 2009, 12:00-1:00 p.m. (Central)

3 © 2009 by Children’s Home Society & Family Services Educating Families On Adopting An HIV Positive Child  Rena Ledin pas001@chsfs.org  MSW Intern-CHSFS  HIV Case Manager Worked in HIV community for over 4 years Carry a caseload of 40 clients between the ages of 6-72

4 © 2009 by Children’s Home Society & Family Services What is HIV?  Human Immunodeficiency Virus Human – this virus can only live in humans Immunodefiency – causes a weakness in the body’s immune system Virus – the causative agent of an infectious disease The virus that causes AIDS

5 © 2009 by Children’s Home Society & Family Services What is AIDS?  Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome Progressive stage of HIV disease An AIDS diagnosis used to mean that an individual was at the end stage of the disease and would not recover. AIDS is no longer a death sentence.

6 © 2009 by Children’s Home Society & Family Services How is HIV transmitted?  The four fluids Blood Semen Vaginal secretions Breast milk There needs to be enough virus HIV must get directly into the blood stream While other body fluids may contain the HIV virus, the concentration is not high enough for transmission.

7 © 2009 by Children’s Home Society & Family Services Paths of Infection  Unprotected vaginal, anal and oral sex with an HIV positive person  Direct blood contact – needle sharing, transfusions, accidents in health care settings.  Mother to child – before or during birth or through breast milk

8 © 2009 by Children’s Home Society & Family Services Facts about HIV transmission  HIV is not transmitted through casual contact  HIV cannot be transmitted though a mosquito or other insect.  Animals and pets cannot transmit or catch HIV  Using the same restroom or toilet as a positive person cannot cause transmission  Donating blood is safe. Sterilized needles are always used and blood is always screened.  You cannot tell by looking at someone if they are HIV+  HIV cannot live outside a human body longer than 30sec.

9 © 2009 by Children’s Home Society & Family Services Statistics United States  1.1 million people estimated to be living with HIV at the end of 2006  5,369 children under the age of 13 have died of AIDS through 2006.  Estimated # of new diagnosis of children in the US in 2006 is 115. Sub-Saharan Africa  22 million people estimated to be living with HIV at the end of 2007.  290,000 children under the age of 15 have died from AIDS.  12.1 million children have lost one or more parent to AIDS.  11 million children have been orphaned by AIDS Avert.com

10 © 2009 by Children’s Home Society & Family Services Access to Medication United States  58% of HIV+ people are being treated  Medications may be covered by insurance companies.  ADAP programs  Medicare/Medicade Sun-Saharan Africa  ~30% of HIV + individuals have access to anti- retrovirals. Avert.com

11 © 2009 by Children’s Home Society & Family Services Why the difference? Gender inequality, poverty, sexual violence, Prevalence of other STI’s (which facilitate HIV transmission) lack of male circumcision, female circumcision, ineffective leadership during critical periods in the epidemic’s spread, economic disparity, social instability, distrust of western medicines, stigma, lack of education. Avert.com

12 © 2009 by Children’s Home Society & Family Services How is HIV detected?  HIV is diagnosed when anti-bodies are detected.  Confirmatory tests will look for proteins of the HIV virus.

13 © 2009 by Children’s Home Society & Family Services How does HIV cause illness?  HIV reproduces continuously in the body while the immune system works to fight off the virus.  HIV may eventually take over and the immune system is no longer able to fight off illness.  A weak immune system makes an individual more susceptible to opportunistic infections and makes it harder to recover from common illnesses such as cold or flu.

14 © 2009 by Children’s Home Society & Family Services Treatment of HIV There is currently no cure for HIV/AIDS. ART/HAART – Combination drug therapy which essentially stops the virus from replicating. (antiretroviral therapy/highly active antiretroviral therapy) Continuous advancement of medications.

15 © 2009 by Children’s Home Society & Family Services How long is the life expectancy for an HIV positive child?  There is no definitive answer to this questions  Without medication, people are expected to become sick after about 10 years and die within 1-2 yrs.  Medications have allowed people to predict that individuals may live 20-30 years past diagnosis (adult estimate).  HIV medication is constantly being researched and improved.  Professionals believe that it will be possible for HIV+ individuals to have the same life expectancy as HIV- individuals in the future.

16 © 2009 by Children’s Home Society & Family Services Medical treatment for an HIV+ child  Primary Physician and HIV physician.  ID physician every 3 months. The child’s physician will inform you if more or less frequent visits are necessary.  HIV medications.

17 © 2009 by Children’s Home Society & Family Services What if an HIV + child gets sick?  The child will likely catch the same bugs and illnesses as other children who are not positive.  If the child’s immune system is strong they will likely have a very similar recovery time as a child who is not positive.  If the child’s immune system is weakened it may take them longer to recover than normally expected.  Unless advised otherwise by the child’s primary or ID physician, it is safe to treat your child with additional medication.  Consult the child’s ID physician if you have questions.

18 © 2009 by Children’s Home Society & Family Services Additional Information on Caring for a child who is HIV+  Follow up on medical care as recommended by physician.  Use caution when helping a child clean cuts or open sores. (transmission risk is very minimal).  It is safe to share plates, utensils, glasses, etc… It is not advised to share anything that may come into direct contact with blood, such as razors.

19 How will this be different from caring for a child who is not HIV+?  Very little difference  May have higher risk of certain illness  Medication administration © 2009 by Children’s Home Society & Family Services

20 What if the child is involved in a situation with a transmission risk?  Contact your doctor, the CDC or an AIDS hotline to determine if there is a risk factor.  If the activity is determined to be a risk factor you have the option of talking to the individual involved yourself OR  You can contact your state department of health and they will send a disease investigator out. NO IDENTIFYING INFORMATION IS GIVEN.

21 © 2009 by Children’s Home Society & Family Services Legal aspects  Americans with disabilities act of 1990 – Parents have the right NOT to disclose their child's HIV status  It is illegal to discriminate against a child due to their HIV status. Legal action can be taken if this occurs  Each state’s law varies

22 © 2009 by Children’s Home Society & Family Services In a child care setting  Universal precautions must be practiced by in a child care setting. (OSHA 1992)  A child cannot be denied childcare because of their HIV status Certain religious or cultural child care settings may be an exception to this.  A parent does not need to disclose child’s HIV status unless their health is a direct threat to others Doctor will determine if health is a direct threat. HIV is very rarely a direct threat.

23 © 2009 by Children’s Home Society & Family Services In the schools  A school cannot discriminate against any student or staff member with HIV.  Students or staff do not have to disclose their HIV status  Education staff must notify parents regarding the districts policies in HIV  Staff must make reasonable accommodations to allow HIV positive children to participate in school sponsored sports.  In most cases, the department of health will notify the school that an HIV positive child is in attendance or a teacher on staff is positive. No identifying information will be given.

24 © 2009 by Children’s Home Society & Family Services What if a problem occurs for the child in day care or school? Know your rights Contact an AIDS hotline if you have questions about the incident. They can advise you on legal implications and referrals Have an action plan in place. Talk to your child! It is important to know how your child is feeling.

25 © 2009 by Children’s Home Society & Family Services Tips on advocating for your child  Educate yourself  Be prepared  Note community resources  Find someone you trust to help you  Reach out  Educate your child. Your child’s HIV does not need to be a secret from them.

26 © 2009 by Children’s Home Society & Family Services Disclosure  American Academy of Pediatrics recommends parents begin discussing HIV status with children when they are school aged.

27 © 2009 by Children’s Home Society & Family Services Advantages of disclosure to children  Improved academic performance  Enhanced self concept and social functioning  Adherence to treatment regimens  Better psychosocial adjustment.

28 © 2009 by Children’s Home Society & Family Services Results of delayed disclosure  Non-adherence of medication  Postponement of discussion of transmission and secondary risk factors  Increase in mental health issues

29 Things to keep in mind around disclosure  Each child reacts differently  “Normal” Development  HIV does not define your child! © 2009 by Children’s Home Society & Family Services

30 Things to consider before Adoption  Learn about cultural beliefs and norms of the birth country.  Talk to friends and family members.  Learn about your community  Educate yourself. © 2009 by Children’s Home Society & Family Services

31 Internet resources  http://www.thebody.com/index/hotlines/other. html (help for finding ASO’s in your state) http://www.thebody.com/index/hotlines/other. html  www.thebody.com (accurate medical HIV/AIDS information www.thebody.com  http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/resources/factsheets/ (statistical and demographic information) http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/resources/factsheets/  http://hivinsite.ucsf.edu/InSite?page=kbr-03- 01-15 (journal articles related to adolescents with HIV) http://hivinsite.ucsf.edu/InSite?page=kbr-03- 01-15

32 © 2009 by Children’s Home Society & Family Services More resources.  http://www.gmhc.org/health/women/ positive_children.html http://www.gmhc.org/health/women/ positive_children.html  http://heldts.blogspot.com/2007/01/r aising-hiv-positive-child-hiv-and.html http://heldts.blogspot.com/2007/01/r aising-hiv-positive-child-hiv-and.html  http://aids.about.com/od/childrentee ns/a/HIV_Kids.htm http://aids.about.com/od/childrentee ns/a/HIV_Kids.htm

33 Upcoming online seminars for families…  Programming For Ethiopian Families  Live Family Webinars  Waiting Family Webinars

34 Spring 2008MN Organization on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome 34 Thank you for joining us! Please confirm your attendance with us today at: mmendez@chsfs.org within 24 hours to receive the follow up packet via e-mail mmendez@chsfs.org  Other upcoming topics: -Current Trends in International Adoption: Country Program Updates and the Impact on Families. Thursday, May 21, 2009, 11-12:30 p.m. (Central)  -Beliefs: A Look at Our Clients and Ourselves. What Do We All Bring To Our Work With Families? And How Does this Impact the Experience? Thursday, June 18, 2009, 12:00-1:00 p.m. (Central)

35 Thank you! Thank you for joining us today and for all your work on behalf of children and families!


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