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The HighScope COR 2 Objectives Participants will be able to: Use the COR to identify what children are learning through their play. Use the COR to identify.

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Presentation on theme: "The HighScope COR 2 Objectives Participants will be able to: Use the COR to identify what children are learning through their play. Use the COR to identify."— Presentation transcript:

1

2 The HighScope COR

3 2 Objectives Participants will be able to: Use the COR to identify what children are learning through their play. Use the COR to identify the developmental levels in children’s anecdotes. Score the COR on a child.

4 3 Assessing Jesse Watch the video clip of Jesse. Assess his development. Share your assessment results.

5 Overview of the COR

6 5 Getting to know you…. In your group, you will be assigned 2 categories of the COR: Initiative, Language and Literacy Creative Representation, Math and Science Social Relations, Movement and Music Learn as much as you can about your assigned section – page 13 of your participant guide. Concentrate on content, don’t worry too much about the format of the COR.

7 6 Getting to know all about you… In your new groups, take turns teaching/summarizing what you learned about your section. Listen while others share their sections with you. Use page 14 to jot down your notes.

8 7 Child Observation Record (COR): Authentic Assessment Measures the full developmental range of school readiness skills children need Initiative Social Relations Creative Representation Movement and Music Language and Literacy Mathematics and Science

9 8 COR: Authentic Assessment Observation-based Preschool edition looks at children 2 ½ - 6 years of age Infant/Toddler looks at children 6 weeks to 2 ½ years of age Profiles 32 aspects of learning organized in 6 broad content categories

10 9 COR: Developmentally Appropriate Process involves observations that occur in the normal course of a child’s day. Content looks beyond a narrow traditional skill set to assess all aspects of young children’s development: social, emotional, cognitive, physical

11 10 COR: User-Friendly Presented in clear, easy-to-understand language, no technical jargon Does not require a specialized degree to use Works within a program’s daily routine, without disrupting it

12 11 COR: Universally Applicable Designed for use in any early childhood setting including: State-funded classrooms Child care centers Public and private preschools Head Start and Early Head Start programs Family child care homes Works with any early childhood curriculum including HighScope Used throughout the United States and Internationally Taking an anecdote in South Africa

13 12 COR: Research Validated Reliability Inter-Observer Agreement: The extent to which COR users agree on scoring.73 for COR total score for subscales Internal consistency: The extent to which COR items within a subscale go together (similar, but distinct).91 and.94 for COR total score for subscales

14 13 COR: Research Validated Validity Construct Validity: The extent to which the relationship between COR items indicate that groups of COR items work together to form distinct subscales Assessed using confirmatory factor analysis Concurrent Validity: Extent to which results from different measures say similar things to COR results COR total score correlations with the Cognitive Skills Assessment Battery (CSAB).46 with Basic Information.57 with Cognitive Skills.62 with Response During Assessment

15 14 Goals of the COR To assess the whole child. To provide teachers with strategies and activities to support the continued growth and development of children in their classroom. To provide parents with information about their child’s growth and development. To share information with administrators about the growth of children in their programs.

16 15 Steps for Using the COR Observe children Record anecdotes and collect other information Use the anecdotes as evidence to score the COR (identify a level) Periodically, review your anecdotes Compile outcome data Use the data for program planning

17 The best evidence we have of whether we are succeeding as educators comes from observing children’s behavior. Alfie Kohn, “Grading: The Issue is Not How but Why,” Educational Leadership, 52, 2 October 1994, p. 40.

18 Relating Anecdotes to COR Categories & Items Now, you’ll learn more about the COR categories and items.

19 18 COR Elements The COR has 6 broad categories. Each category has 3-9 specific items. Each item has 5 developmental levels. This week we are working with the categories and items.

20 19 COR Categories Initiative Social Relations Creative Representation Movement and Music Language and Literacy Mathematics and Science

21 20 COR Observation Items Book In your COR Observation Items book, turn to page 25 and then page 33 to see how the book is organized to help you.

22 Each section starts with a rich overview of the category. Stop and read the overviews for each of the six categories: Initiative – p. 3 Social Relations – p. 9 Creative Rep. – p. 15 Movement & Music – p. 19 Language & Lit. – p. 25 Math & Science – p. 35 Observation Items, page 25

23 More about this Item COR Item Other items in this category COR Category Other categories Item levels Observation Items, page 33 Each COR Item has it’s own page, as seen here.

24 23 Relating an Anecdote to a COR Category and Item Carefully read your anecdote. Use your COR Observation Items to choose the category that you feel is related to the anecdote. Read through the items in that category and select the one that your anecdote illustrates. NOTE: If it’s not a good “fit”, keep looking. Don’t force an anecdote into an item!

25 24 Entering An Anecdote: Manual COR Version Turn to the child’s individual Child Anecdotes booklet. Write the anecdote under the appropriate category. Circle the letter of the appropriate item Circle the number of the appropriate score. (Don’t do this now. We will cover scoring later.)

26 Sample Child Anecdotes Booklet Page

27 This is what an anecdote looks like in the Child Anecdotes booklet…

28 27 Entering An Anecdote: COR CD-Rom or OnlineCOR.net Versions Click on the child’s name. Type in the anecdote. Select the appropriate category. Select the appropriate item. Select the appropriate score. (Don’t do this now. We will cover scoring later.)

29 28 Cross-referencing If you have an anecdote that fits under more than one category, you can cross- reference it! Cross-referencing saves time because you don’t have to re-write anecdotes. Cross-referencing helps you see the breadth of the anecdote.

30 29 Cross-referencing: Manual COR Version Place the anecdote under one of the categories you are considering. For example, if it fits under both Creative Representation and Initiative, write the anecdote under only once category. Choose the item and score. At the end of the anecdote make a note to indicate that it also illustrates another item, for example, “X-Ref: Item W.” Circle the cross-reference note to make it readily identifiable. Then turn to the other COR category and circle the appropriate item. Instead of rewriting the anecdote, jot down the page and item where the anecdote can be found For example, “see page 19, item M.”

31 30 Cross-referencing: COR CD-ROM or OnlineCOR.net Enter the anecdote and select your first category, item, and score as you normally would. For example, if you are considering items A and Q, it doesn’t matter which item you choose to do first. Then, select another category, item, and score for the same anecdote. The computer records the both scores for you!

32 31 Let’s try it! Here’s your anecdote: 4-10 At work time, in the art area, Moya drew a recognizable picture with crayons. She climbed up in my lap and showed me her “sun, tree and the bush where the bunny hides.”

33 32 Where does this anecdote go on the COR? Category: Social Relations Item E: Relating to adults and Category: Creative Representation Item J: Drawing and painting

34 What does it look like?

35 34 What if an anecdote doesn’t seem to match any COR Item? You will occasionally have anecdotes that fall under one of the 6 COR categories, but don’t illustrate any of the items. If that’s the case, Simply record the anecdote under the category and stop there. Don’t record an item or score. Remember, the COR is a sampling of important child skills and abilities. “Unscored” anecdotes may still be useful in planning and in preparing family reports.

36 35 Working with Latrice’s Anecdotes Use Latrice’s anecdotes and find the corresponding COR category and item for each (pages 22-23)

37 Scoring Anecdotes You’ll learn more about scoring your anecdotes.

38 37 COR Developmental Levels Now that you’ve chosen a category and selected an appropriate item, it’s time to score the anecdote. Each COR item has 5 developmental levels: 1 is the simpler level 5 is the most complex

39 Sample Anecdo tes COR Level Explanation Sample Anecdotes Observation Items, page 33 Each Item has 5 Levels. Each Level has an explanation and sample anecdotes.

40 39 Scoring Guidelines To score an anecdote, turn to the item you’ve selected. Read through all five levels, explanations, and sample anecdotes. Choose the level that your anecdote illustrates most clearly. If you’ve cross-referenced the anecdote, select the appropriate level for the cross- referenced item in the same manner.

41 40 Scoring Conflicts Can’t decide between two levels? Don’t score the anecdote yet. Continue to collect anecdotes for this item. Additional anecdotes may show the child’s developmental level more clearly. Return to the un-scored anecdote. Score it based on what you now know about the child. Otherwise, score it at the lower level you’ve been considering.

42 41 Scoring Example Use your Observation Items to score the examples. Here is an anecdote for item L: 3/11 Outside, Vinnie ran around the tree house climber three times and then went up the steps, one foot after the other holding on to the railing. The score would be a 3: Child walks up or down stairs, alternating feet.

43 42 Scoring: You Try It! Try scoring this anecdote for Item B: 03/19 During work time, at the water table, Liam wanted to make water come out of the tubing “like a fountain.” First he tried pouring water in one end of the tube and the water just poured out the other end. He then blew in the tube and the water did come shooting out in a blast. What score did you get? HINT: Use your Observation Items to score!

44 43 Liam at the Water Table

45 44 Scoring Answer You should have gotten a level 4. Liam tried two ways to solve a problem with materials: he tried pouring and then blowing to make a fountain.

46 45 The newest HighScope game show… Name that Score!!!

47 46 9/27 WT, in the block area, Jason put the blocks into a heap. He said, “Everyone get away from the dynamite, it’s gonna go up higher than a tree! Item R 9/27 WT, in the block area, Jason put the blocks in a heap. He said, “Everyone get away from the dynamite, it’s gonna blow up!” Name this score:

48 47 R. Using vocabulary 1. Child talks about people or objects close at hand. 2. Child talks about absent people or objects. 3. Child uses vocabulary related to a particular subject. 4. Child uses two or more descriptive words to describe something. 5. Child asks about the meaning of a word. R. Using Vocabulary Level 3. Child uses vocabulary related to a particular subject.

49 48 11/02 At WT, in the house area, Deola, Aisha, and Jason, pretend to be “puppies,” crawling and sniffing around the table. “Pretend I’m sad `cuz my mom died,” Jason said. “She was killed by a hunter.” Item K. 11/02 At WT, in the house area, Deola and Jason, pretend to be “puppies,” crawling and sniffing around the table. “Pretend I’m sad `cuz my mom died,” Jason said. “She was killed by a hunter.” And he pretended to cry. Name this score:

50 49 K. Pretending 1. Child acts like an animal, object, or another person. 2. Child uses one or more objects to stand for another object. 3. Child uses both words and actions to portray a role, situation, or setting. 4. Child engages in role-play with two or more children. 5. Child steps out of a role-play situation to clarify it or give directions, then returns to the play. K. Pretending Level 5. Child steps out of a role-play situation to clarify it or give directions.

51 50 3/11 At Snack, Andrew told Vinnie and Jordyn about a boy he knows named Randy. “I know,” he said, “Candy could be his sister and Fandy could be his brother!” Item T. 3/11 At snack, when Vinnie told Jordyn about his cousin Randy, she said,“I know-Candy could be his sister and Fandy could be his brother!” Name this score:

52 51 T. Showing awareness of sounds in words 1. During play, child makes an animal, vehicle, or other environmental sound. 2. Child joins in saying or repeats a rhyme or a series of words that start with the same sound. 3. Child rhymes one word with another or makes up a phrase or sentence that includes a rhyme. 4. Child says that two words begin with the same sound. 5. Child creates a pair or series of words that start with the same sound. T. Showing awareness of sounds in words Level 3. Child rhymes one word with another or makes up a phrase or sentence that includes a rhyme.

53 52 03/19 SGT, Hannah tries gluing popsicle sticks together side-by- side. When they fall apart, she decides to tape them together. They still wobble, so she tapes the taped sticks to a piece of cardboard. Item B 03/19 SGT, Hannah tries gluing popsicle sticks together side-by-side. When they fall apart, she tries to tape them together and that works. Name this score:

54 53 B. Solving problems with materials 1. Child expresses frustration when encountering a problem with materials. 2. Child identifies a problem with materials and asks for help. 3. Child tries one way to solve a problem with materials. 4. Child tries two ways to solve a problem with materials. 5. Child tries three or more ways to solve a problem with materials. B. Solving problems with materials Level 4. Child tries two ways to solve a problem with materials.

55 54 2/22 WT --- Della makes Sarah an invitation to her birthday party. On it she writes: BFD PT “It says, `Birthday, I’m having a party,’ she tells Sarah. Item X. 2/22 WT, block area, Della places the blocks to make a “D” and an “O.” She said, “The D is for me, and the O is for my brother,” (her brother’s name is Oscar). Name this score:

56 55 X. Writing 1. Child writes using pictures, squiggles, or letter-like forms. 2. Child makes a recognizable letter using clay, wire, or sticks. 3. Child writes 2 or more recognizable letters. 4. Child writes a string of letters and reads them or asks to have them read. 5. Child writes a phrase or sentence of 2 or more words. X.Writing Level 2. Child makes a recognizable letter using clay, wire, or sticks.

57 56 Scoring Portfolio Objects Portfolio objects can also be evidence of a child’s level of development. Collect and label portfolio objects with the date and COR item. In place of an anecdote, put “see portfolio sample _____ ” on the COR. Record the score.

58 57 Portfolio Scoring Example Evelyn wrote her name several times on the wipe-off board. This photograph illustrates what she did and saves you from writing an anecdote. HINT: Be sure to record the date and COR item on the back or in the file name! On back: 11/30 Item X

59 58 Scoring Clarification Remember, score each anecdote individually. You do NOT need evidence of a level 1 before scoring an anecdote at a level 2, or evidence of a level 2 before scoring an anecdote at a level 3. Children come to us with varying abilities. When you start using the COR, some may be at a level 2 or 3 in some areas, others may be at a level 1. Score the anecdotes that you have! Do not expect every child to start the COR at a level 1.

60 59 Practicing Scoring With a partner, practice scoring your anecdotes for Latrice.

61 60 Scoring Ella Working alone, use your Observation Items booklet to select the most appropriate level score Ella’s anecdotes (pp in your Participant Guide.) In groups, compare your scores, discussing any discrepancies. See if you can come to a consensus in your group. Share our results. Any questions?

62 61 Ella’s Scores L-4 M-5 N-5 O-1 Q-4 R-4 S-4/R-3 T-3 W-4 V-2 Y-2 Z-3 AA-2 BB-3 DD-2 EE-3 A-5 B-3 C-4 D-3 E-2 F-2 G-2 I-4 J-3 K-1

63 Compiling Scores With all your anecdotes collected and scored, now you are ready to compile individual and class COR data.

64 63 Overview Most programs compile and report COR scores 2-3 times a year. First, scores are compiled for each individual child. Then they are compiled for the whole class.

65 64 Manual COR Users To compile a child’s scores, look for the highest score for each item. Remember, this version of the COR was validated using one solid anecdote to determine the score. (The earlier version required two anecdotes.)

66 65 Example 1 Item B. Solving Problems Micah has three anecdotes scored for this item: One anecdote scored 2 One anecdote scored 3 One anecdote scored 4 We would record a score of 4 for Item B because 4 is her highest score. HINT: Remember – it’s the highest score, not the average score for the item!

67 66 Example 2 Item K. Pretending Micah has three anecdotes scored for this item: Two anecdotes scored 3 One anecdote scored 4 We would record a score of 4 for Item K because 4 is her highest score. HINT: Although more anecdotes are scored 3, select the highest scored anecdote – in this case 4.

68 67 Record Each Child’s Scores Use the “Child Information and Developmental Summary” sheet to record the scores. If you are a Head Start teacher, there’s a place to record the child’s English language information on the front of the sheet.

69 68 Average the Category Scores First add together the scores for one category. Then, divide the category total by the number of items scored in that category. Category total = 15 Divide by 4 items 15 ÷ 4 = 3.75 Category average = 3.75 HINT: Use your calculator for this section!! ItemScore A5 B3 C4 D3 Total15

70 69 Record Category Averages Continue averaging the category scores. Put the average scores on the child’s Developmental Summary. Sample Child Developmental Summary

71 70 Compiling Class Data Complete a Developmental Summary sheet for each child in your class. Transfer each child’s category averages to the Class Summary form. Class Summary Form

72 71 Computer Versions of the COR If you use onlineCOR.net, the program does all these computations for you! You just have to select which report to print out!

73 Filling in the Gaps Gaps are un-scored COR items. If you find you have gaps, thoughtful planning can help you gather the missing information.

74 73 Gaps: Filling in Missing COR Information There are three types of gaps: 1.Am I looking for this COR item? It could be that you haven’t paid attention to this COR item. Children might be doing it, but you just haven’t been collecting anecdotes on this item. 2.Do I have materials in the classroom to support this COR item? Are there opportunities for children to use classroom materials to support this item in their spontaneous play? 3.What can I do to support this COR item with all my children? You can take a proactive role in planning to support these missing COR items.

75 74 Gap Idea: 1. Plan to Look for this COR Item Try the following to help you plan to look for children engaged in item-related play: Read over the item carefully. When and where might you see children spontaneously engaging in this type of play? Plan to collect anecdotes during these times. For example: Carla discovered she wasn’t looking for Item U. Demonstrating knowledge about books. She planned to collect anecdotes during greeting time, when children had 15 minutes to choose and look at books together with their parents and teachers.

76 75 Gap Idea: 2. Add Item-Related Classroom Materials If you are missing item-related materials, try the following: Read over the item carefully. What materials would lend themselves to children engaging in this type of play? Look at your classroom, what item-related materials might you add to your environment? For example: When Jose walked through his classroom, he found he didn’t have materials to support children’s natural seriation – or graduated series (Item Z. Identifying patterns.) He and his co-teacher added the following to their classroom: a canister set and measuring cups to the house area, 4 sizes of pillows to the book area, and they rearranged the unit blocks so the blocks are seriated on the shelves: small blocks – medium blocks – large blocks.

77 76 Gap Idea: 3. Plan Activities and Using Item-Related Language If you just aren’t seeing a particular item, try the following: Plan small-group and large-group activities that lend themselves to the missing COR item. When interacting with children, use item-related language yourself. For example: Shandra and Clarice saw they needed anecdotes for Item CC. Identifying position and direction. Together they made a plan to use position and direction words with children at work time. They also planned a movement activity that used position and direction words for large-group time.

78 77 High/Scope Resource: What’s Next?  Refer to What’s Next? Planning Children’s Activities Around Preschool COR Observations for additional ideas for lesson plans.  What’s Next? contains a minimum of 2 activity ideas for each level of every COR item.  You can order What’s Next? by calling PRESS or at

79 78 Assessing Jesse Again Watch the second video clip of Jesse. Assess his development. Share your assessment results. What have you learned about appropriate assessment?


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