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Wednesday 24 th September A Passage to India Chapter 14, 15 (and 16)

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Presentation on theme: "Wednesday 24 th September A Passage to India Chapter 14, 15 (and 16)"— Presentation transcript:

1 Wednesday 24 th September A Passage to India Chapter 14, 15 (and 16)

2 We have established the growing gulf between Adela and Mrs Moore

3 What do we learn about Mrs Moore and Adela from their discussion on the train? Mrs Moore “Had felt nothing acutely for a fortnight” Hoped for a nap Wants to return to England Realises that “man is no nearer to understanding man” (p.126) Falls asleep “exhausted” – her age is being emphasised “in rather low health” “ought not to have attempted the expedition” Does so in order to not impact the “pleasure of others” Dreams express being pulled by different children Adela “Had felt nothing acutely for a fortnight” “Blamed herself severely […] This was the only insincerity in a character otherwise sincere” “I don’t believe in the Hot Weather” – naïve Likes “plans” Described as “dry, honest” Doesn’t sense the message the train emits (as Mrs M might) p.127 Wonders “ how can the mind take hold of such a country?” Described as “reliable”

4 “…the sky to the left had turned angry orange” (p.128)

5 p.128: the disappointment of the sunrise As she spoke, the sky to the left turned angry orange. Colour throbbed and mounted behind a pattern of trees, grew in intensity, was yet brighter, incredibly brighter, strained from without against the globe of the air. They awaited the miracle. But at the supreme moment, when night should have died and day lived, nothing occurred. It was as if virtue had failed in the celestial fount. The hues in the east decayed, the hills seemed dimmer though in fact better lit, and a profound disappointment entered with the morning breeze. Why, when the chamber was prepared, did the bridegroom not enter with trumpets and shawms, as humanity expects? The sun rose without splendour. He was presently observed trailing yellowish behind the trees, or against insipid sky, and touching the bodies already at work in the fields. "Ah, that must be the false dawn— isn't it caused by dust in the upper layers of the atmosphere that couldn't fall down during the night? I think Mr. McBryde said so. Well, I must admit that England has it as regards sunrises. Do you remember Grasmere?" "Ah, dearest Grasmere!" Its little lakes and mountains were beloved by them all. Romantic yet manageable, it sprang from a kindlier planet. Here an untidy plain stretched to the knees of the Marabar.

6 Which of the novel’s concerns are sustained by this paragraph? As she spoke, the sky to the left turned angry orange. Colour throbbed and mounted behind a pattern of trees, grew in intensity, was yet brighter, incredibly brighter, strained from without against the globe of the air. They awaited the miracle. But at the supreme moment, when night should have died and day lived, nothing occurred. It was as if virtue had failed in the celestial fount. The hues in the east decayed, the hills seemed dimmer though in fact better lit, and a profound disappointment entered with the morning breeze. Why, when the chamber was prepared, did the bridegroom not enter with trumpets and shawms, as humanity expects? The sun rose without splendour. He was presently observed trailing yellowish behind the trees, or against insipid sky, and touching the bodies already at work in the fields. "Ah, that must be the false dawn— isn't it caused by dust in the upper layers of the atmosphere that couldn't fall down during the night? I think Mr. McBryde said so. Well, I must admit that England has it as regards sunrises. Do you remember Grasmere?" "Ah, dearest Grasmere!" Its little lakes and mountains were beloved by them all. Romantic yet manageable, it sprang from a kindlier planet. Here an untidy plain stretched to the knees of the Marabar.

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8 What does the elephant represent? Why is Aziz so proud of it? We’re going to watch the section of the film, which is David Lean’s reading of the section of the text we’re about to explore.

9 While you’re watching: (write this down) MAKE NOTES: Observe any discrepancies Consider how Lean conveys subtleties that are held in the narrative (but are harder to convey on screen) Look for cinematic devices and consider how they are working to convey themes and symbolism

10 The film...

11 Two groups Beth(?), Luke, Joe, Alessandro Dissect pages : Extract and discuss ‘key’ quotations Look for references that illuminate the novel’s themes Consider motifs and symbols Look out for discrepancies with the film and consider why choices were made Consider HOW Forster has told this part of the story. Discuss and engage Serena, Rob, Zak, Jas

12 Feedback (Friday?)

13 “The sky dominated as usual” p.131


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