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The National Dropout Prevention Center/Network Leading Graduation Rate Improvement In Your School & Community Dr. Sandy Addis Interim Director 864-656-0957.

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Presentation on theme: "The National Dropout Prevention Center/Network Leading Graduation Rate Improvement In Your School & Community Dr. Sandy Addis Interim Director 864-656-0957."— Presentation transcript:

1 The National Dropout Prevention Center/Network Leading Graduation Rate Improvement In Your School & Community Dr. Sandy Addis Interim Director

2 The National Dropout Prevention Center National Organization at Clemson University – Services to states and schools – Research – Resources - Training – Conferences – Technical Assistance 28 Years of Dropout Prevention Service

3 Resources and Services of The National Dropout Prevention Center ■ ■ Network membership, materials and discounts ■ Conferences and events (San Antonio, October, 2015) ■ National Dropout Prevention Specialist Certification ■ Publications, guides, and web broadcasts ■ Consultation and technical assistance ■ Reviews and evaluations ■ Training, speakers, workshops ■ Graduation Rate Planning Support 3

4 4 As a Dropout Prevention Spokesperson, You Help Determine:  Local understanding of the issue.  Level of educator and community focus on the issue.  Selection and funding of local strategies.  Local policies relative to at-risk issues.

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8 8 Steps for Leading Graduation Rate Improvement Address the data Highlight the cost Develop understanding of the problem Highlight the causes Focus on solutions

9 U.S. Graduation Rates ( ) NOTE: Average Freshman Graduation Rates. Graph retrieved 1/23/15 from

10 Types of Dropout and Graduation Rates According to NCES, its indicators of school dropout and school completion include the following:  Event dropout rate  Status dropout rate  Status completion rate  Averaged freshman graduation rate (Non-regulatory cohort rate) 10 (National Center for Education Statistics, Trends in High School Dropout and Completion Rates in the United States: )

11 Regulatory Four-Year Adjusted Cohort Graduation Rate 11

12 Source: National Center for Education Statistics – Common Core of Data (CCD) and NCES Provisional Data Reports.

13 82%

14 National Averaged Freshman Graduation Rate (AFGR) for Public High School Students, by Race/Ethnicity: School Year Source: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, Common Core of Data (CCD), "NCES Common Core of Data State Dropout and Graduation Rate Data File," School Year 2011–12, Preliminary Version 1a. See CCD table at

15 The Diploma Award Gap in Texas Native American AsianHispanicBlackWhiteOther % Total Enrollment 0.43%3.62%51.34%12.74%29.98%1.90% 2010 % Diplomas Awarded 0.52%3.73%43.07%13.35%39.32%

16 16 Economics of High School Dropouts  Earn less  Pay less in taxes  Rely more on public health  More involved in criminal justice system  More likely to use welfare services (Rotermund, California Dropout Research Project, Statistical Brief 5, September 2007)

17 17 Unemployment Rate by Educational Attainment 2012  Doctoral degree %  Professional degree %  Master’s degree %  Bachelor’s degree %  Associate’s degree %  Some college %  High school degree %  Less than high school % (Bureau of Labor Statistics, May 2013, )

18 Workers per Social Security Beneficiary Currently :1 ratio Mercatus Center George Mason University

19 19 If Georgia Had a 90% Graduation Rate in 2012, There Would Be: $457 Million annual earnings increase in Georgia $342 Million annual spending increase in Georgia $824 Million increased home sales in Georgia $45 Million increased auto sales in Georgia 3,850 new jobs added in Georgia $71 Million annual increase in federal tax revenue in Georgia $42 Million annual increase in state and local tax revenue Alliance for Excellence in Education, 2013

20 20 If Myrtle Beach Had a 90% Graduation Rate in 2012, There Would Be: $8.4 Million annual earnings increase in Myrtle Beach $6.4 Million annual spending increase in Myrtle Beach $15 Million increased home sales in Myrtle Beach $1 Million increased auto sales in Myrtle Beach 60 new jobs added in Myrtle Beach $1.3 Million annual increase in federal tax revenue in Myrtle Beach $700,000 annual increase in local tax revenue in Myrtle Beach Alliance for Excellence in Education, 2013

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22 22 Drop Out of School Stay in School 22

23 National Dropout Prevention Center/Network PATHWAY TO DROPPING OUT Dropping out of school is the result of a long process of disengagement that may begin even before a child enters school.

24 Dropout Risk Factors Dropout Risk Factors and Exemplary Programs: A Technical Report by C. Hammond, J. Smink, and S. Drew, NDPC and D. Linton, Communities In Schools, Inc. May 2007

25 Research Domain Factors ■ Individual ■ Family ■ School ■ Community 25

26 I - Individual Domain Risk Factors 1.High-risk demographic characteristics 2.Early adult responsibilities 3.High-risk attitudes, values, and behaviors 4.Poor school performance 5.Disengaged from school 6.Education stability

27 II – Family Domain Risk Factors 7. Background characteristics 8. Level of household stress 9. Family dynamics 10. Attitudes, values, and beliefs about education 11. Behavior related to education

28 III – School Domain Risk Factors 12. School structure 13. School resources 14. Student body characteristics 15. Student body performance 16. School environment 17. Academic policies and procedures 18. Supervision and discipline policies/practices

29 IV – Community Domain Risk Factors 19. Location and type of community 20. Demographic characteristics of community 21. Environment of community

30 30 Reasons for Dropping Out of School Students who considered dropping out of high school gave these reasons for considering this option:  I didn’t like the school…………………………………………..73%  I didn’t like the teachers ……………………………………….61%  I didn’t see value in the work I was being asked to do……..60%  I had family issues ……………………………………………..42%  I needed to work for money…………………………………… 35%  I was picked on or bullied……………………………………… 28%  No adults in the school cared about me……………………...24%  The work was too easy…………………………………………19% (Yazzie-Mintz, “Voices of Students on Engagement: A Report on the 2006 High School Survey of Student Engagement”)

31 What Students Say Top Five Reasons Reported by Students for Leaving School 1980 Didn’t like school (33%) Poor grades (33%) Chose to work (19%) Getting married (18%) Couldn’t get along with teachers (15%)

32 What Students Say Top Five Reasons Reported by Students for Leaving School Didn’t like school (33%)Didn’t like school (51%) Poor grades (33%)Were failing school (44%) Chose to work (19%)Couldn’t get along with teachers (34%) Getting married (18%)Couldn’t keep up with school work (31%) Couldn’t get along with teachers (15%) Feel like they don’t belong at school (25%)

33 What Students Say Top Five Reasons Reported by Students for Leaving School Didn’t like school (33%)Didn’t like school (51%)Classes were not interesting (47%) Poor grades (33%)Were failing school (44%)Missed too many days and could not catch up (43%) Chose to work (19%)Couldn’t get along with teachers (34%) Spent time with people not interested in school (42%) Getting married (18%)Couldn’t keep up with school work (31%) Too much freedom and not enough rules in my life (38%) Couldn’t get along with teachers (15%) Feel like they don’t belong at school (25%) Was failing in school (35%)

34 % Graduated in Four Years Days Absent Per Semester Course cutting counted as partial days (The Consortium on Chicago School Research at the University of Chicago, 2007) 34

35 % Graduated in Four Years Average Freshman Grades Rounded to the nearest 0.5 (The Consortium on Chicago School Research at the University of Chicago) 35

36 IV What Can Leaders Do?

37 Effective Dropout Prevention Involves Coordinated Effort Student Family Community School

38 “Efforts to improve educational outcomes in these schools, attempting to drive change through test-based accountability, are thus unlikely to succeed unless accompanied by policies to address the out of school factors that negatively affect large numbers of our nation’s students.” (Berliner, 2009, Poverty and Potential: Out of School Factors and School Success)

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42 What Role Does the Board Play? Is the Board well informed about dropout prevention efforts of the schools? Are there policies that contribute to dropping out? Do discipline policies and practices allow continued enrollment and academic success whenever possible? Are at-risk-related metrics such as attendance, discipline, and graduation rates considered in employee evaluation and rewards? Does the Board encourage staff to learn more about dropout prevention?

43 Consider Graduation Rate Impact When Dealing With Big Issues Retention Attendance Grades

44 Board Graduation Rate Considerations Boards establish the point at which we cut students off from school. Boards set the guidelines for “rule implementation”. Boards define how professional educators make decisions for wounded and traumatized students. Boards must balance popular perception against best interests of individual students. Boards determine the utilization of alternative discipline options.

45 What Is the Impact of Leadership? Are leaders aware of graduation rates? Do leaders know their most at-risk students? How do leaders interact with at-risk youth? Do leaders model positive behaviors toward at- risk youth? Do leaders want troublesome students to remain enrolled? Do leaders establish physical and emotional safety of all students?

46 What is the School Climate? Does the school feel safe and inviting? Do students and parents feel good about their school? How are parent participation rates at school events? Do parents, teachers, and leaders communicate often? Is there an ongoing focus on graduation as an end goal?

47 How Does Instruction Impact Graduation Rates? Are all courses interesting to students? Do students see relevance in instruction? Are students active rather than passive learners? Is technology used to make instruction interesting? Are instructional methods and speeds varied for different students? Are numerous career pathways and career-related courses offered?

48 How Do Teachers Prevent Dropouts? Are teachers trained in at-risk factors and dropout prevention strategies? Do teachers make students feel valued and welcome? Are all students personally known by teachers? Do teachers initiate positive communications with parents and students? Do early-grade teachers own the dropout problem?

49 Administrator Resources and Actions ■ Access resources at ■ Provide staff and stakeholders with resources and materials ■ Train staff in dropout prevention strategies ■ Network with and learn from others ■ Inform the stakeholders and decision makers in your school, district, and community 49

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